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View Full Version : Wording on product labels...



elani75
01-25-2003, 07:06 PM
Hi all.

I have noticed that some hair companies create one product they feel addresses both dry and damaged hair. They also say things like "for fine/thin hair" also. Now, my beef with this is yeah, my hair is dry but far from damaged. I have fine hair, but my hair isn't thin neither. Maybe it's just the way I am interpreting "thin?" It just seems a little misleading. Either that or these companies do not take into account that many black women are in my position. So who are the products for? :?

What do you do when you see the wording like this on hair products you see in the stores? I always have to stop and ask myself why why why do I never see products that say "for oily thick hair" or "fine thick hair." Doesn't fine refer to the texture of the hair and thick to the density of the hair?

I'm just throwing these thoughts out there and of course, venting.

Take care.


-e

jazzypom
01-25-2003, 07:40 PM
i'm still trying to come to terms with product recommendations like 'dry/damaged' or 'damaged/ coloured'. I tend to look for 'very dry/ very damaged' products and they still arent moisturizing for my hair. The body shop banna conditoner for dry hair aint bad.

krazeenapps
01-25-2003, 08:29 PM
Good question. Are you talking about makers like Pantene and L'oreal, along those lines? I would think that they do this because they are not actually catering to black women (or even trying). Instead, they expect us to still be using relaxers/texturizers and strictly ethnic products, without realizing that those products are usually catering to women who straighten. Basically, once again, we are in the minority. :roll: Our hair looks so thick that how can we possibly have thin hair? Fine must equal thin, and coarse must mean it's dry, right? It's an illusion.

When you see a white woman, and you see her hair is fine, is it usually thick? From what I've seen, it's usually fine and thin, hence products for fine/thin hair. Same for dry hair. Dry hair must be damaged, hence products for dry/damaged hair. Or maybe that slash means 'or.' ::sigh::

Basically, they try to cover too many bases in one product, and that's not good. A woman might use products for dry/damaged/color treated hair, and may have color treated hair, but it isn't necessarily dry or damaged. So she's most likely getting extra ingredients in her hair, and so after she uses it, she says, "This didn't do much for me. It doesn't work." When it probably OVERworked her hair, to the point where she thought it didn't work.

I give up, basically.

elani75
01-25-2003, 09:05 PM
Good question. Are you talking about makers like Pantene and L'oreal, along those lines? I would think that they do this because they are not actually catering to black women (or even trying). Instead, they expect us to still be using relaxers/texturizers and strictly ethnic products, without realizing that those products are usually catering to women who straighten. Basically, once again, we are in the minority. :roll: Our hair looks so thick that how can we possibly have thin hair? Fine must equal thin, and coarse must mean it's dry, right? It's an illusion.

When you see a white woman, and you see her hair is fine, is it usually thick? From what I've seen, it's usually fine and thin, hence products for fine/thin hair. Same for dry hair. Dry hair must be damaged, hence products for dry/damaged hair. Or maybe that slash means 'or.' ::sigh::

Basically, they try to cover too many bases in one product, and that's not good. A woman might use products for dry/damaged/color treated hair, and may have color treated hair, but it isn't necessarily dry or damaged. So she's most likely getting extra ingredients in her hair, and so after she uses it, she says, "This didn't do much for me. It doesn't work." When it probably OVERworked her hair, to the point where she thought it didn't work.

I give up, basically.

Krazeenaps, that's EXACTLY what I am talking about! You hit the nail on the head.:) I give up, too. I guess I'll just find stuff that works and that's it. But, the wording is misleading and they really aren't thinking about people like us... *smh* Indeed, it is an illusion. *sigh*

elleebeme5
01-25-2003, 10:49 PM
I think the wording can be 'negative'. One of Frederick Fekkai's conditioners says it's for unruly hair. My hair ain't unruly just cause it's curly!