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spaceoddity
03-16-2011, 05:49 PM
If you found out you were Nigerian would that mean you were suddenly going to adhere to Nigerian culture and everything? I mean you could, but you also don't have to. Just live your life and create your own culture. I'm 100% Cameroonian, but I don't feel like that's my only culture, and I'm restricted to it or anything. You can experience the great parts of many cultures. Don't feel like just because it's not in your "ancestry", you can't take part in other things. You have the whole world to enjoy. Don't get hung up in the past, and about being "certain" about everything

G.Eve
03-16-2011, 05:53 PM
Well Said. I am me............moving on....

Princess Pamplemousse
03-17-2011, 03:43 AM
I love my past. Without it, I wouldn't have a present. And yes, I love my past, my culture in particular. Above all others. That doesn't mean that I can't appreciate and enjoy other cultures and histories, but if I had a culture swapper machine, I'd stick with mine every time ;)

That said, I assume you're piggy-backing off of recent posts dealing with black Americans and some "lack" of culture...an alienation from where they come from. If so, I have to say that as a black American, I know exactly where my people come from. America by way of the Middle Passage. I think the trials they went through were sufficient to qualify as culture making.

So basically, I have to know (and do know) where I come from so I can know how I got to where I am today. And what went into making it possible for me to continue moving forward.

Stargazer2893
03-17-2011, 10:26 AM
Just part of our (humans) natural curiosity...that's why we've traced our MtDNA all the way back to Mitochondrial Eve...it's just fascinating, I guess. That being said, I'll have my DNA traced/mapped as soon as I win the lotto! lol

spaceoddity
03-17-2011, 02:07 PM
I'm saying this cause some people seem so hung up about getting their ancestry totally right, but I don't think that's what's really important. if my ancestry comes from other places, how does it really change me? i guess i'm very anti-traditional. my culture is cool and all but i like other cultures as well.. so i'll incorporate what i like into the way i live. there is no "ultimate culture". of course a lot of people think the way they live is the shit

Princess Pamplemousse
03-17-2011, 02:50 PM
Well do you boo lol. No one's going to strap you down amd force you to be traditional or find your ancestors. We can all be cool appreciating what we want to appreciate.

Ms-gg
03-17-2011, 10:00 PM
Oh okay....I want to know where I came from so I can feel complete as a person. Of course I was born in America, but my ancestors were from some place else. You only live once and I would like to know where my peoples came from *yeezy shrug*

Veviticus
03-17-2011, 11:57 PM
I did a very extensive research on who my ancestors were, not to find out who I am....I already know who I am, but it was information that was very interesting to know.

The experience of finding pictures, and all types of county, service, records, birth certificates, etc., was very revealing and confirmed alot of things that I had questions about.

HappyNappy0210
03-18-2011, 04:37 AM
I subscribed to Ancestry.com just a few days ago. I thought it would be interesting to find out more about my family. Also, I miss my great-grandmother and want to know more about her and her life. My GG did not raise my grandmother, who seems irritated when I ask her questions. Apparently, there are some secrets that my grandmother will not reveal and you know some folks can't leave well enough alone.

KellyVonn
03-18-2011, 04:59 AM
I think people want to know for various reasons. Nothing wrong with that in my opinion. *Shrugging shoulders*

Julia_75
03-18-2011, 05:51 AM
I want to know what percent Native I am so I can claim casino funds and get student loans forgiven.

spaceoddity
04-04-2011, 11:03 AM
I want to know what percent Native I am so I can claim casino funds and get student loans forgiven.

I'm hoping you're being sarcastic

CinnamonBiscuit
04-04-2011, 02:13 PM
People keep dating, marrying, sleeping with, and making babies with their relatives because they don't know where they come from.

Maybe YOU don't care, and it's probably because you KNOW your ancestry, but everytime I meet someone, it turns out they're a relative. There have been guys I've seen who were totally cute, and then I found out we're related and it's just.......ewwww. Add to that how I have a huge chunk of my family that I don't even know, and yeah. I want to know where I come from and who my people are.

canmechelle
04-04-2011, 02:31 PM
In school we had to do a geneology project. I was only able to trace back to my maternal great grandmother in Mississippi. There isn't much oral or written history in my family. My grandmother and her siblings know very little about their mother's history because it was never spoken about. There is even less information about my great grandfather. Depending on who you talk to he was either lynched or killed by a rival gang. Other kids were able to go back centuries and had the countries that their family members migrated to the US from..incredible.

I would L-O-V-E to know more about my history and possibly a people in Africa to trace my roots back to. I wouldn't adopt or change MY culture but it would mean a lot to me. To go from nothing before the 1900's to having a history would be amazing.

afrochica
04-04-2011, 03:10 PM
My sister took a geneology/DNA test last year to see what percentages of black, white, native american that we were. We grew up thinking that we had some Native American ancestry, but it turns out that we're African (70%) and European (30%). We then researched further and found out that our European descent is from Scotland/Ireland but originally from England. Our African ancestors also came from Eastern Africa (Mozambique). I do think it's important to know more about our ancestors, because you can find out disease risks that you might not have known about. We had no idea that we were at a high risk of breast cancer, celiac disease, and restless leg syndrome. My sister and I also researched more about my mom's side of the family. We found out that my great, great, grandfather was a white man who owned a lot of land. He gave his land to his kids and that explains why my grandfather owned so much land, because it was rare for a black man to own a lot of land. It really does feel great knowing your family's history.

Princess Pamplemousse
04-04-2011, 03:14 PM
I'm hoping you're being sarcastic

I was hoping this thread was sarcastic....:p um j.k.

Denny
04-06-2011, 01:51 PM
Well do you boo lol. No one's going to strap you down amd force you to be traditional or find your ancestors. We can all be cool appreciating what we want to appreciate.

:D Exactly! Ignorance is not always bliss.....

spaceoddity
04-07-2011, 09:22 PM
People keep dating, marrying, sleeping with, and making babies with their relatives because they don't know where they come from.

Maybe YOU don't care, and it's probably because you KNOW your ancestry, but everytime I meet someone, it turns out they're a relative. There have been guys I've seen who were totally cute, and then I found out we're related and it's just.......ewwww. Add to that how I have a huge chunk of my family that I don't even know, and yeah. I want to know where I come from and who my people are.

How closely related are you talking about? Cousin? 2nd cousin?

All humans are related at some point, anyways

CinnamonBiscuit
04-07-2011, 11:02 PM
Close relatives. I'm not talking about two people whose ancient great ancestors might have had the same relatives thousands of years ago.

purebodydetox
04-23-2011, 11:10 AM
I think it can help each person understand the social/psychological history of their family and clues as to why they are the way they are. It's not just about genetic ancestry, not all the time, but many times we 'inherit' other aspects of who are ancestors were.

It might help one become a better person. Knowing the past might strengthen a family's bond.

Why not?

Julia_75
04-23-2011, 07:27 PM
I was hoping this thread was sarcastic....:p um j.k.

Me too lol:-))

blackpanthershay13
04-24-2011, 04:39 PM
I want to know what percent Native I am so I can claim casino funds and get student loans forgiven.

Julia lol
But really student loans are forgiven?

Karibana
04-24-2011, 04:47 PM
I want to know what percent Native I am so I can claim casino funds and get student loans forgiven.

:huh::-))........

Julia_75
04-24-2011, 04:57 PM
Julia lol
But really student loans are forgiven?

They actually are lol but I was just being facetious...but hey what's wrong with taking advantage of opportunities that befall you? :-))(:-)

blackpanthershay13
04-24-2011, 05:26 PM
They actually are lol but I was just being facetious...but hey what's wrong with taking advantage of opportunities that befall you? :-))(:-)

Not a bloody thing lol ha

Pyvsi
04-26-2011, 01:08 PM
In my humble opinion, I think it has much to do with our being social creatures. No matter how well established a person is as an individual, you cannot undo the way we are designed. We are designed to belong to a group. We can create our own groups and become part of fraternal orders, special interest clubs, religious groups, professional organizations, friendship circles or cliques to soothe that yearning for connection and belong. Yet people can change their minds and not fit in anymore, not accept you, or disband altogether.
But nothing can truly substitute for the belongingness that's built in to us; knowing that before we were even born, we were already connected to a group (family, clan, tribe) and we belonged. I don't care how fashionable it is to be individualistic and independent and to act like "I don't need anybody else to help me be who I am." The old saying is true: No (wo)man is an island. Belonging is important. Always has been. Always will be.

And another thing, while I'm blabbing:
Diversity is not Everything! Diversity is literally the spice of life, but it is not the main meal. What kind of healthy would I be if I had a little bit cinnamon for breakfast, some dried basil and garlic for lunch, and a bit of parsley for dinner? Isn't that crazy? I need some substance, the actual meal that these spices enhance.
Diversity is the seasonings; being among your own people is the substance of the meal.
Modern American culture wants to get all freaked out because everybody's not mixing and mingling 100% of the time.
"Oh no! These neighborhoods are not diverse enough!"
What the hell! These are peoples HOMES you're talking about. Now you mean to tell me that even in our personal lives, it's "wrong" or "non-progressive" to associate with people who remind of us ourselves!

smh

sistuh afro
05-12-2011, 11:22 PM
@Pyvsi Honey you spoke nothing but the truth and ase to you!

Kathleen1
05-13-2011, 11:48 PM
i wanna know my ancient ancestry so i can find out how i got all this good hurr all ova mi head!!!! i must be .00000009999 % Messican or some Native American or sumthing! ROTFLMFAO!

#youfigureitout!

Himmy
05-14-2011, 12:41 AM
I know a good portion of mine...and I love who I am. I wouldn't change a thing. I think to each his own, but it really is OK to want to know who yo' people is...and be proud of said people.

queenofcurls
05-14-2011, 09:50 PM
i wanna know my ancient ancestry so i can find out how i got all this good hurr all ova mi head!!!! i must be .00000009999 % Messican or some Native American or sumthing! ROTFLMFAO!

#youfigureitout!

LOL cause you know people try to do that smh!

I just think everyone should have the opportunity to celebrate their nationality/heirtage. If you know and choose not to, that's fine. It's your decision. But personally I hated having to do projects on your family's country of origin because I was such a fraud picking a random country in Africa since I didn't know. If people want to find out so their children will be raised knowing, or just for their peace of mind they should be able to. It doesn't change who you are now but I'm sure it gives you a feeling of being a part of something bigger than just you and your close family.

caribengirl
05-19-2011, 02:53 AM
yes this is something thats very important to me..i believe that i will feel like i belong and have a clearer identity.

honestly i think this is part of whats wrong with our people....its like we arent accepted over there or here...not always but alot of times thats how it is....its like we came out of nowhere....like we are floating around in space trying to fit somewhere...i cant really think of any other race that has this problem..i could be wrong....this is just really a big issue.

i feel like if we have a culture or group of people and traditions to identify with.....that for a change our people will feel like they belong...like they have something to call their own

i know for a fact its going to make a huge difference in my life and i mean in a good way

netta1
06-05-2011, 04:04 AM
Why not know?

coalblacklocs
07-20-2011, 12:31 AM
Knowing where you come from is a big part of knowing who you are and where you fit in in this world. Why you do what you do, and tend to be who you be. It can also explain some of your family traditions.

It's extremely difficult to understand what it feels like to not know where your people have come from over the centuries if you are not one of those people who don't know.

the vast majority of people know where their ancestors are from. Most African American people had that stolen from them. Africa is a continent full of different people with unique cultures and differing pasts. During slavery, african people were all treated like those pasts don't matter and that they were all the same. Learning where you come from is a way of gaining back some of the knowledge of culture that was ripped away from our enslaved ancestors. It's a source of power and self worth, and white people of the time KNEW that, that's why it was denied to those slaves.

Also, I have ancestors who were native american, and the vast majority of THOSE tribes were basically wiped from the map. I'd like to know who they were so that their existence in me will not be forgotten and just erased from time.

currently, i'm a bit too dead broke to do some dna testing, but that is one of my biggest goals for the near future.

MissQueenie
07-20-2011, 04:16 PM
If I was to find out that my family is of oh I don't know kenyan or egyptian decent then I doubt that everything or even most things in my life would change. I would however be able to look at my decendants culture and adopt whatever interesting things I wanted to into my life. Why not? My decendants are a part of me. My american culture is a part of me. I can be whoever I want to be and if that means bringing some japanese culture into my life would make me happy then I'll do it. If it means bringing some nigerian culture in my life would make me happy then I'll do that too. Who is so powerful here that they can say 'Well if you learned that you're this and that nothing would change so get over it'?

kinksr4me
07-27-2011, 11:38 AM
Most on this site are African Diaspora. We have been (due to the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade), displaced and have had any past culture taken from us. You know that you are 100% Cameroonian-we don't have that luxury: and yes it is a LUXURY. Why do you think slave masters went to such great lengths to "snuff" out the cultures, languages, habits of the people they oppressed.
Hint: Breaking up community ties leaves the individual weaker and therefore easier to control, demean and own both physically and psychologically.

coalblacklocs
07-27-2011, 12:37 PM
Most on this site are African Diaspora. We have been (due to the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade), displaced and have had any past culture taken from us. You know that you are 100% Cameroonian-we don't have that luxury: and yes it is a LUXURY. Why do you think slave masters went to such great lengths to "snuff" out the cultures, languages, habits of the people they oppressed.
Hint: Breaking up community ties leaves the individual weaker and therefore easier to control, demean and own both physically and psychologically.
((((Amen.))))

Zenith1920
08-04-2011, 03:36 PM
I want to know...because it is still a part of me. Not that I will change the way I've been living...it would just feel good to know...who I'm a descendant of. Almost a year ago...my dad told me that I am a descendant of the Igbo tribe in Nigeria. It felt good to know that...and I started to look things up about the Igbo people and history...for me. (I'm a knowledge seeker too..I love learning)
I am interested in knowing where my people have come from...because I am a part of the lost ones brought to America..without a choice. I believe in knowing about the history of my people...whether it is the ones...that were born here in America...or those born elsewhere.

I've known that my Maternal Great Grandmother was a Native American and Creole for a while..and even that I found interesting and wanted to know more.

All in all...it's because their blood runs through me too...and they make up parts of me...

...Peace&Love...

mahsoul1
08-05-2011, 05:48 PM
How could this a real question is my question. *confused*

Nya2011
11-15-2011, 04:44 AM
But nothing can truly substitute for the belongingness that's built in to us; knowing that before we were even born, we were already connected to a group (family, clan, tribe) and we belonged. I don't care how fashionable it is to be individualistic and independent and to act like "I don't need anybody else to help me be who I am." The old saying is true: No (wo)man is an island. Belonging is important. Always has been. Always will be.

So, TRUE. If we didn't want to belong, their wouldn't be so many suicides in teens for feeling as though they've been alienated. With that being said, does anyone know a safe, reliable, inexpensive place where I can look for my ancestry and do DNA testing to see where my genes are rooted.

Pyvsi
12-01-2011, 08:01 PM
Why do you think slave masters went to such great lengths to "snuff" out the cultures, languages, habits of the people they oppressed.
Hint: Breaking up community ties leaves the individual weaker and therefore easier to control, demean and own both physically and psychologically.

^^^This.
(insert sound effect of dropped mic here)

Kaichi
12-04-2011, 11:45 PM
I'm very curious of my roots and really, who doesn't want to know where they come from? Who doesn't want to know who their past incestors were and what they did. It is absolutely fascinating. No, most people won't change their culture just to mirror their past culture, but what is so bad about just learning it?

Anyways, I'd rather people try to find their true roots than make believe their roots. There is a myth that African Americans are all a mix race people, but in truth that is farthest from it. Only 20-25% of us have european in us. Satistics say that only 1% of us have Native American. I never believe it when people tell me they are part native american. I've heard it so much that I can't help but think "prove it" every time. I find it interesting that many black americans who do take the test, expecting to find some native in them, find none at all. People think "oh, I'm pretty light skin, must have some Indian or white in me" or "my hair is so long, I must have some mixture some where." They don't realize that Africans are the most diverse-looking people in the world due to the fact that Africa is the birthplace of human beings. Igbos are a west african tribe known to have many light skin individuals( not all light skin). Many west africans have hair that reach way below their shoulders. Again, I wish that more African Americans were curious about their roots and study all things Africa.

Me, when I get the money, I will take a DNA test. All I know is my father is black american and my mother is haitian/bahamian.

miamimichelle
05-25-2012, 06:31 PM
Interesting discussion!

@ Kaichi...around 60% of African Americans have some European ancestry, the average percentage is 20-25% European within that 60%.

@ cinnamonbiscuit…DANG, that’s messed up! My (half) sister and brother have about 25 siblings running around the city and don’t know even all of them. Their dad should have been castrated L

Personally, I don't feel a strong desire to have one of these tests done, but if a free one falls in my lap I'd probably do it. What people often miss is that when these tests come back saying your genes indicate Dinka or Igbo or whatever they don't capture your full ancestry. It's just a fraction of your ancestry...your matrilineal or patrilineal line. So it’s your mother’s mother’s mother’s or father’s father’s father’s lineage. If you also have cousins/close relatives to test the picture gets a little fuller, but you'll never have a complete picture of "where you come from". It’s a partial picture.

I know I have a butterscotch complexion, high cheekbones and straight nose, kinky coils, full lips and a big ole azz, it doesn’t matter a bit to me how I got them.

The OP can take knowing her “roots” for granted where many of us living in the Diaspora cannot. This doesn’t affect my feeling of belonging, I don’t think finding out than one ancestor in hundreds was Fulani will help me come to terms with the experience of Blacks (and myself) in America…but I can respect those who do. Maybe my sense of belonging isn’t tied so much to race—or I take it for granted that I’m a Black American as a legitimate culture on its own. I agree with the OP in that we can/should participate in cultures that are not our own. I’ve never fully understood why people take African dance class or learn to speak Swahili as a way to “connect” to their roots. If you don’t know which culture/tribe/group you’re derived from isn’t it an artificial connection? Plus Swahili is an East African language…most North American Blacks have roots in E. Africa. Maybe something is better than nothing for some…I dunno. I dance salsa and I’m not a Latina purely because I enjoy it (though it is in part African-derived)

I wonder if other black folks in the Diaspora struggle with this as much as African Americans (which is not a term I use for myself) most folks I know will say “I’m British, but my family is Jamaican” or “I’m Brazilian”. Again interesting topic!

jalarise84
09-04-2012, 01:21 AM
It's only natural that "African Americans" would want to find their ancestry. Do any of you ever notice that we're named after two continents (Africa and America)? This tells us absolutely nothing about our true lineage. Of course, slavery caused all of this, but I feel that we shouldn't just accept the label of "black" or "African American" because we don't know where we really come from and sadly, some of us don't care. It just would be nice to know the truth, and we've all heard before that the truth will set/make you free!

miamimichelle
09-06-2012, 02:15 PM
Oops...I meant most Black Americans have roots in W. Africa, not E. Africa

MzKinkz85
10-20-2012, 08:49 PM
My father is a native born Kenyan... I'm so proud. I love it when people asked me where my family is from when I say my name to them. I'm blessed. My mother was born in the states but I'm taking a test to see which part of Africa she is from. I'm a proud African and I love learning and celebrating my culture more and more everyday.

icetia
05-30-2013, 03:41 PM
Most on this site are African Diaspora. We have been (due to the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade), displaced and have had any past culture taken from us. You know that you are 100% Cameroonian-we don't have that luxury: and yes it is a LUXURY. Why do you think slave masters went to such great lengths to "snuff" out the cultures, languages, habits of the people they oppressed.
Hint: Breaking up community ties leaves the individual weaker and therefore easier to control, demean and own both physically and psychologically.

Thank you for stating this! I always give a side-eye to people that criticize from the "outside". And yes, a person that knows their ancestry but questions why anyone else would want to know theirs is definitely commenting from the "outside".

LBellatrix
05-30-2013, 04:07 PM
I always give a side-eye to people that criticize from the "outside". And yes, a person that knows their ancestry but questions why anyone else would want to know theirs is definitely commenting from the "outside".

Co-sign...and it's really a HUMAN thing to want to know where you come from if it's not super clear. The only people I know who aren't at least somewhat curious are those white Americans who call themselves "mutts" ("I'm German, Irish, Scandinavian, I don't even KNOW") and people who can certify that they're 100% ____. Adopted kids and adults often want to know about their bio-families, for example.

Of course we know that for those AAs who were descended from enslaved peoples, it's not accurate to call ourselves 100% anything (other than African-American, I guess). I've done quite a bit of genealogy on my mom's side of the family and then a few years back my parents got the DNA test done (it was from a company that only told you about your African heritage; my parents weren't interested in knowing about the non-African :D ). They couldn't conclusively establish what part of Africa my mom's ancestors were from but they were able to point to a couple of specific west African ethnic groups for my dad's people.

Now if I ever make it to that part of Africa, hell yeah I want to have an Alex Haley-style experience and meet my "people" if possible, but will it change how I live my daily life? Well, if my new cousins tell me that the reason why they don't have fibroids is because they've been using this herb for hundreds of years, best believe I'm going to get my supply :D but other than that, not really. But to know that my true "roots" are in this place...yeah, that would be pretty cool.

icetia
06-01-2013, 12:29 PM
Thank you for making the comparison to adopted children that long to know their birth parents! Perfect analogy.

How dope is it that you got a chance to do the African DNA test?! It's even cooler that your parents didn't care AT ALL about the non-African part :D

Intellexual
06-01-2013, 02:41 PM
Seems akin to superstition and hypochondria whereas something is wrong or missing if someone doesn't have that particular label to put upon themselves. A feeling of loss or lacking to not "know" one's birthday, age, and/or zodiac sign. A distanced feeling perhaps from purpose or betterment to not have social allowance to take pride in a specific culture. These sentiments have been exploited just as people have used fraternities, races, zodiac signs, genders, etc. to encapsulate their prejudices and assert their hierarchy.

The precursors to be minded, given unknown parentage, seem less vast than the social imperative of one's belonging to have predated dehumanization. It is as if being recognized as a human before democide is a greater (even if dormant) passion than being a better human today. I find that so in many people who identify with martyrdom, victimhood, isolation, etc. Our species is a pack animal, but there has been an indoctrination of elitist and even inbred mediocrity whereas even royals (for instance) are hallmarked by genetic inferiority and incestuous retardation.

Science has proven the fallacy of these ideals and social evolution and even progress has given us many histories to demonstrate that legacy hasn't made for better people. In reality, legacy has been one of the greatest precursors for genocide. The people who covet that sense of belonging are prone to try to exterminate and/or practice various degrees of incest to assert themselves. This often includes domination of those deemed inferior despite what these people who are seeking to be longest are doing to degrade the viability of their genetic material.

The form of "belonging" that African Diasporans are being sold on is a sickness which also has caused people to voluntarily give some of the most oppressive governments their DNA. From point blank range it is scientific fact that the m-DNA "root" finding makes for a guessing game that relies more on racist interpretation than science. It's sort of like a child reading the face of adults to decide how they themselves feel. Meanwhile, the US government has once again used the inferiority complex they've fostered to database their subordinates.

We already know or within reason to figure that Africans who weren't dispersed aren't better than us. We for damned sure should be able to figure out that superstition, theology, and sentimentality doesn't serve us. While humorous and maligned, the whole idea of being pure or of innocent blood (like Native American) rather lends to a sense of hierarchy and "room" to be more exploitative with impunity rather than an excuse to be a better person in deed. It's a sick and depraved game to be socially better rather than so in deed. That's like "pretty" people being figured of less character and people regarded as "ugly" being condemned to rely on personality and deed. This is another way people are trying to make themselves "prettier" and/or more desirable socially rather than actually doing better.

I appreciate that we're a pack species. However, this is a bastardization built upon exclusivity, inbreeding, and isolation. It's that racism and isolation which breaks up our collective powers rather than not knowing where we can belong with greater authenticity or whatever. A proper battery of health screenings, including for mental illnesses, would suffice. Act as if every precursor is within reason as knowing isn't even knowing these days. That's a sort of how I feel about this "knowing" hustle, even as a blacked intellectual and all that jazz.

I'll try to add a video about how bogus those DNA hording government operations are (for instance), as if everything else used to brainwash blacked folk hasn't turned up to be so. teehee

- The DNA database betrays the racism of those behind it (http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/joepublic/2009/jul/13/dna-database-black-community) (July 2009)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmsJJ2lNLOM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZUkC2C_9lE
- DNA ancestry tests branded 'meaningless' (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/9912822/DNA-ancestry-tests-branded-meaningless.html) (March 2013)

"As a result, almost every Briton is a descendant of Viking hordes, Roman legions, African migrants, Indian Brahmins, or anyone else they fancy.”

His colleague Prof Mark Thomas said: "These claims are usually planted by the companies that provide these so-called tests and are not backed up by published scientific research. This is business, and the business is genetic astrology.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHjJJfhfRgs

"It's less than .1 percent."

LBellatrix
06-01-2013, 02:56 PM
Thank you for making the comparison to adopted children that long to know their birth parents! Perfect analogy.

I've got several adopted kids in my (immediate and extended) family...


How dope is it that you got a chance to do the African DNA test?! It's even cooler that your parents didn't care AT ALL about the non-African part :D

Girl listen...my parents were about as pro-black as you could get while raising their kids in an integrated suburb...

Because I've done a lot of my mother's genealogy, I know that there are several different branches and some of them are more "white" than others. I'm descended from one of the less-white branches. I remember when I was a kid I talked to some of the elders who were from the more-white branches -- and by "more white" I mean they could pass for white -- and they hated white folks like you would not BELIEVE. I was there in their living rooms, I heard them say it...which is why I find it ironic and more than a little sad that some of their descendants are trying to play up their more-white ancestry by creating some kind of alternate history. I'm still waiting for them to provide real proof that Massa really loved their great-great-grandmother and didn't just rape her...ain't seen it yet... :-|

Soul Rebel
06-16-2013, 07:11 AM
Odd thread. I missed it originally. At first my initial reaction was that I don't and I didn't care to do any testing to find out specifics until I had to (my fam was involved in the whole OK native peoples land dispute thingme). Other than that I know that I am a bazillion generation American which means I have a little of everything going, with the majority obviously being of African descent of some nature, and I'm fine with that.

THAT SAID - I really do not care for how the OP framed the conversation. I do think it is part of human nature to want to know one's origins and questioning other people as to why they would want to know when YOU know YOURS is just ridiculous, IMO. And really this is one of those "why do you care" situations.

Odd.

NubianPrize
07-09-2013, 05:55 AM
Oh okay....I want to know where I came from so I can feel complete as a person. Of course I was born in America, but my ancestors were from some place else. You only live once and I would like to know where my peoples came from *yeezy shrug*

I just sent in my DNA sample to Ancestry.com. It's only $99 instead of those triple digit ones. Why am I doing this? Because I'm CURIOUS. Still the same me, just gives me more info about my background

NubianPrize
07-09-2013, 06:05 AM
Good answer !! My thoughts exactly

straightnochaser
08-09-2013, 06:33 PM
You already know where you came from, so why begrudge me the same opportunity?