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Shanna
12-04-2004, 04:03 PM
I was reading an article by someone... I don't remember the details. I just remember this was a successful, fairly well-known Black male scholar. I can't remember whom though, or where this article was unfortunately.

Anyway, he talked about how nobody wants to admit that they got ahead on Affirmative Action because they have to much "pride". And he says that the more people want to downplay the role that affirmative action played in their successes, (especially those who achieve great successes), the easier it will be for the Court to continuously knock down the program and get rid of it altogether. The guy that wrote this... he said that yes, he got where he is today on it and that makes him no less worthy or no less successful. So, for those that are pro-Affirmative Action, would you be willing to say you were helped by it?

Bunny
12-04-2004, 04:15 PM
Sure. I won a minority scholarship that paid for my undergraduate tuition!

Button2004
12-04-2004, 09:06 PM
Absolutely. If it was not for affirmative action, Colgate would never have jumped on the bandwagon to increase diversity and probably would not have accepted me to their institution.

Affirmative action does not mean that people of color and women are selected just because of the color of their skin or their gender. It means that qualified people of color and women are not overlooked. When institutions are looking to hire people of color and women they look very hard at their qualifications. There is more pressure on affirmative action applications, institutions pick the top of the top black people for their diversity initiatives.

Therefore, I am just as qualified as White students to be here.

Another thing, why is that people never draw attention to the fact that white women benefit from affirmative action to. More than any other disadvantaged group. Look at them now and look at where they were just a few decades ago.

LBellatrix
12-05-2004, 06:52 PM
Button's response allowed me to look at my issues with AA in a different light.

I realized that my issues with AA stemmed from an inability to distinguish between the reality of AA (qualified people of color "not being overlooked") versus the perception of AA (people of color admitted regardless of qualifications). I mean, I KNEW the textbook difference between AA and quotas, but I guess I wasn't applying that difference to myself.

If race had never taken into consideration, I firmly believe I would still have been accepted to the colleges I was accepted to, simply because, based on numbers and test scores alone, I was more qualified than most applicants REGARDLESS OF RACE. In a class of 150 girls (2/3rds of them white) I had a higher GPA than approximately 140 of them.

What has always bothered me about some blacks' approach to AA is that IMO actual merit (as in intelligence, talent, and good old-fashioned hard work) is downplayed and an attitude of "they LET you in" is emphasized. As in: "You're only in that college/in that job position because you're black, not because you're smart or talented." They too view it as merely filling a quota. And maybe that's where the rejection of AA amongst some blacks comes from...because we KNOW that we can compete with the best non-blacks out there.

But the key thing (as Button's post illuminated so well for me) is that we still have to get IN the door before we can compete. And that is the point of AA.

I cannot deny (especially since it's in the public record :) ) that I benefitted from college scholarships earmarked specifically for people of color. I simply would not have been able to attend the college I chose if I hadn't had those scholarships (along with a summer internship that too was earmarked for people of color). So yeah, AA got me in. My own hard work and talent KEPT me in.

PrincessDrRe
12-05-2004, 11:28 PM
I receive a minority scholarship right now......once a year. Sho' do....and I am proud to proclaim it!!!

PDR

Lokii
12-06-2004, 02:44 PM
Absolutely. It helped me get my degrees from two good schools. I always said that college was my 40 acres and my mule. This wasn't given to me - my ancestors prepaid my tuition and I earned the grades to get in and to get the degrees.

To tell the truth I wasn't even aware that there was a stigma attached to affirmative action until I was years into my higher ed experience. I have never heard black people talking about being "let in" or "given anything". I did hear a few negative comments from white students but it was water off a duck's back.

Anyway getting in because you are black doesn't mean that you are less qualified. Colleges receive more applications than they have spaces for. Lots of people have straight As and high standardized test scores so they have to look to what else makes you interesting. It makes sense to me that a majority white institution can benefit by diversifying its student body and if being black was the deciding factor for the admissions panel then I have no problem whatsoever with that.

On a final note I'm willing to bet that any "minority" who is ashamed of affirmative action isn't a business person. I have never heard of any business owner complaining about federal and state set-aside contracts. I doubt that any minority business person wants to have to compete for business with e.g. booz allen hamilton or lockheed martin.

mgtgcc
12-08-2004, 01:12 PM
Multiple Scholarship Recipient Checking In and AA Analyst by profession. It never ceases to amaze/annoy me that this perception is so prevalent in the black community. Unfortunately, whites reactions are totally expected but as Lokii stated,
it was water off a duck's back.
It would take until time immemorial, to list how many times qualified "minorities" are OVERLOOKED in Corporate America. As AA action also includes White Females, I have often witnessed a white female hired and/or given a promotion while management conveniently overlooks a more qualified Black, Latino/Hispanic, Asian or Native American Male/Female. <_<

ITA with the scholar. The Courts are growing increasingly more anti-AA. I work in the field of Labor and Employment and while some Plaintiff&#39;s are successful in job discrimination suits, overwhelmingly the burden is on the Plaintiff to prove a pattern of discrimination and that is easier said than done.

roxygirl
12-08-2004, 10:45 PM
I received a minority scholarship when I was in college, as well as one that was open to all freshman who met a certain GPA. I was never more proud or ashamed of one over the other. :)

NappyMica
12-14-2004, 03:38 PM
I received a minority scholarship to grade school, high school and college because of my color and grades, of course. I&#39;m very proud of it. I was also in a summer program each year where minorities, who maintained a certain GPA, went to a different college each summer and learned Engineering, basic computer programming and Actuarial Science.

I, personally, would be a fool if I said AA did not play a part in my success today.

I remember being in high school and hating it sometimes (you know, one of the Private Schools where they have a few of the less fortunate, inner city kids be blessed with their education) because I felt I didn&#39;t have anyone to relate to. I was the only black girl in my entire class and by the time I was a junior, it was me and the one senior. I thank God for the experience NOW but I didn&#39;t appreciate it then. People still give a funny stare when I tell them the High School I went to.

If it had not been for my AA scholarsips, my grades and of course, my color, I would not have had the experience. I probably wouldn&#39;t be able to function at work either, being as though I&#39;m the only black HERE!

Me220
12-17-2004, 04:22 AM
I am currently attending college on a minority scholarship. I would admit it, and I am always willing to argue the importance of AA programs. I&#39;m afraid of how it&#39;s working in the courts, and in society. People are losing what AA is about and what it is needed for.

feepee
12-17-2004, 03:32 PM
i got a couple minority scholarships when i went to college. but i still had to maintain a good GPA in order to qualify and/or keep getting the money...

i swear if affirmative action really made it THAT easy, i&#39;d be doing ALOT better than i&#39;m doing right now.

ToyaS
12-17-2004, 05:06 PM
I am absolutely a woman who has benefited from affirmative action and I have no qualms about saying it. While in high school, I got an internship with Procter and Gamble through a program that only catered to minority students - I was a young woman of color with excellent grades who deserved to work at Procter and Gamble, but if I had not been in that program, I would never have gotten my foot in the door. I went to college on a scholarship given only to minority students - that does not mean that I was less qualified, but rather that I was extremely qualified and rewarded for being so. My parents could not afford to send me to college, so I got a minority scholarship that recognized my right to be there regardless of my financial situation. When I graduated, I got a job with the federal government, precisely because they were looking for a woman of color to work on issues of cultural competency and ethnic health. I took this job and am not ashamed that being a Black woman was what got my foot in the door because I am more than qualified to hold this position. Now that I am here, I have made sure to ally myself with Blacks in Government and the Federal Women&#39;s Program, to make sure that other minorities and women are given equal advantages. It does not faze me that I was considered before qualified White applicants - being passed over happens to Black folk every day. When a White person brings up "reverse discrimination" my answer is, "Boo hoo. Cry me a river."

tsm

marissasensei
12-18-2004, 02:26 AM
Originally posted by Button2004@Dec 4 2004, 02:06 PM

Affirmative action does not mean that people of color and women are selected just because of the color of their skin or their gender. It means that qualified people of color and women are not overlooked. When institutions are looking to hire people of color and women they look very hard at their qualifications. There is more pressure on affirmative action applications, institutions pick the top of the top black people for their diversity initiatives.

Therefore, I am just as qualified as White students to be here.

Another thing, why is that people never draw attention to the fact that white women benefit from affirmative action to. More than any other disadvantaged group. Look at them now and look at where they were just a few decades ago.
632671


ITA.

This topic reminds me of a quote from one of my law professors. She started working as a lawyer right around the time when the legal profession was just opening up to women. Anyway, she said she was often asked, "How does it feel to have gotten your job because you are a woman." Her response? "Better than NOT getting the job because I&#39;m a woman." ^_^ That pretty much sums up my attitude.