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ByHis Grace
01-15-2005, 02:57 PM
Recently... It has come to me to start telling my 5 y/o Daughter and others when there is opportunity that I am
"Taking my Black Back " :afro:

...one way is by wearing my hair the way God gave it to me...
embracing the nap...realizing that my hair is not broken,,does not need to be fixed, just cared for.

One way I am "Taking My Black Back"" by nuturing and embracing mine
and my daughter's natural naps...

I am , "Taking my Black Back" by embracing my African as well as my African American Culture. I am teaching my children....and when given opportunity I share with others.


Any Thoughts...Has this thought ever occurred to you ,to
" Take It Back??"

~*welekevu*~
01-15-2005, 03:34 PM
Beautifully said. Reclaiming my heritage is the reason I came home... back to my natural state.

I think it's beautiful that you're teaching your daughter to embrace her natural self. Oftentimes, parents don't know what kind of damage they may be doing by not reinforcing that idea. By simply starting to relax a child's hair you are sending a message, whether willingly or not. I applaud you for passing the blessings of acceptance, understanding and self love on to your daughter.

Peace and Power.

:afro: welekevu

nappylove
01-15-2005, 04:49 PM
I think I do mines sometimes without knowing it, by listening to African singers like Miriam Makeba, and Fela Kuti, or wearing some type of African garment or shirt that speaks of Africa in some way. I don't think that I do it for show or to prove anything, I really actually love it! I had to explain to a friend of mines because she asked why do blacks do that. I told her it is a way of us trying to connect to Africa, since we have been disconnected for sooooooo long. I think it's wonderful!

mstnt
01-15-2005, 05:22 PM
I feel ya girl!! One way I love to support black owned businesses and also I love to read anything dealing with our history.

I also take back my blackness by schoolin' our people on alot of dealing with our culture and also try to encourage them to read and not just rely on t.v to teach them things.

Good post!!! :D

meagan22
01-16-2005, 06:32 AM
Originally posted by nappylove@Jan 15 2005, 11:49 AM
I had to explain to a friend of mines because she asked why do blacks do that. I told her it is a way of us trying to connect to Africa, since we have been disconnected for sooooooo long. I think it's wonderful!
675909

I think it's great that you schooled your friend. At the same time I think that it's a dang shame that people (Black and non-Black) don't understand why Diasporans work aspects of continental African culture into their lives. Though it may pain some folks to admit this, our heritage doesn't start with enslavement.

I'm taking my Black back:

by pursuing Af.Am. Studies

by sharing what I learn with all of my friends and family

by taking every opportunity I can to fight stereotypes, half-truths, and flat out lies that are told about people of African descent

by supporting Black owned and opperated businesses

meagan22
03-15-2005, 05:47 AM
BUMPing for fun :D

Urbanite
03-15-2005, 12:52 PM
Originally posted by meagan22@Jan 16 2005, 01:32 AM
I think it's great that you schooled your friend. At the same time I think that it's a dang shame that people (Black and non-Black) don't understand why Diasporans work aspects of continental African culture into their lives. Though it may pain some folks to admit this, our heritage doesn't start with enslavement.

I'm taking my Black back:

by pursuing Af.Am. Studies

by sharing what I learn with all of my friends and family

by taking every opportunity I can to fight stereotypes, half-truths, and flat out lies that are told about people of African descent

by supporting Black owned and opperated businesses

676578




:smil3f72836ee752e: You took the words out of mouth. I, too, do all of these things to take my Black back.

Nappilocs
03-15-2005, 01:18 PM
Originally posted by nappylove@Jan 15 2005, 04:49 PM
I think I do mines sometimes without knowing it, by listening to African singers like Miriam Makeba, and Fela Kuti, or wearing some type of African garment or shirt that speaks of Africa in some way. I don't think that I do it for show or to prove anything, I really actually love it! I had to explain to a friend of mines because she asked why do blacks do that. I told her it is a way of us trying to connect to Africa, since we have been disconnected for sooooooo long. I think it's wonderful!

675909



DITTO!

morena23
03-15-2005, 01:30 PM
My Black was never taken......

Ameka
03-15-2005, 01:41 PM
No, I can truely say that I never lost it.

ScoobyGurl
03-15-2005, 04:45 PM
Originally posted by morena23+Mar 15 2005, 08:30 AM-->
My Black was never taken......

758821
[/b]


<!--QuoteBegin-Ameka@Mar 15 2005, 08:41 AM
No, I can truely say that I never lost it.

758831


:pointlaugh: I don&#39;t think these were meant to be funny but they just made me laugh.

Chlyric Images
03-15-2005, 06:47 PM
very cute....I like it!

leshapesha03
03-15-2005, 07:03 PM
Originally posted by ByHis Grace@Jan 15 2005, 09:57 AM
Recently... It has come to me to start telling my 5 y/o Daughter and others when there is opportunity that I am
"Taking my Black Back " :afro:

...one way is by wearing my hair the way God gave it to me...
embracing the nap...realizing that my hair is not broken,,does not need to be fixed, just cared for.

One way I am "Taking My Black Back"" by nuturing and embracing mine
and my daughter&#39;s natural naps...

I am , "Taking my Black Back" by embracing my African as well as my African American Culture. I am teaching my children....and when given opportunity I share with others.
Any Thoughts...Has this thought ever occurred to you ,to
" Take It Back??"

675767


That&#39;s awesome! Very commendable of you! Congrats!

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 07:11 PM
Originally posted by morena23+Mar 15 2005, 09:30 AM-->
My Black was never taken......

758821
[/b]


<!--QuoteBegin-Ameka@Mar 15 2005, 09:41 AM
No, I can truely say that I never lost it.

758831


How so? I would like to know how you 2 managed this?

Ameka
03-15-2005, 07:19 PM
Culture, attitudes etc... are only stolen if you give them away and allow them to be stolen.



But thats just me.

morena23
03-15-2005, 07:24 PM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 15 2005, 11:11 AM
How so? I would like to know how you 2 managed this?

759379


The same as anyone. Who and what I am has not and will never be taken away. My awareness didn&#39;t start when I cut my perm off and I don&#39;t see a natural head of hair as being the starting point of anybody&#39;s "Snatch Back the Black" crusade.

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 07:25 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 03:24 PM
The same as anyone. Who and what I am has not and will never be taken away. My awareness didn&#39;t start when I cut my perm off and I don&#39;t see a natural head of hair as being the starting point of anybody&#39;s "Snatch Back the Black" crusade.

759402

I am talking way broader then hair.....how did you manage not to lose your "black"?

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 07:26 PM
Originally posted by Ameka@Mar 15 2005, 03:19 PM
Culture, attitudes etc... are only stolen if you give them away and allow them to be stolen.
But thats just me.

759396

What is your culture and where did you get it from?

morena23
03-15-2005, 07:31 PM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 15 2005, 11:25 AM
I am talking way broader then hair.....how did you manage not to lose your "black"?

759403


Am I any different than I was the day I was born?

And saying I did lose it - how am I supposed to have found it - by studying Africa? Why does black always equal Africa. It does not.

Ameka
03-15-2005, 07:31 PM
Culture = American

Who gave it to me = God

feepee
03-15-2005, 07:36 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 01:31 PM
Am I any different than I was the day I was born?

And saying I did lose it - how am I supposed to have found it - by studying Africa? Why does black always equal Africa. It does not.

759419

i missed the part where someone said black equals Africa. :dunno:

but i can relate to people finding their personal culture rooted in their African heritage. and i find it admirable when folks (namely black americans) aren&#39;t ashamed to claim that part of their heritage.

morena23
03-15-2005, 07:41 PM
Originally posted by feepee@Mar 15 2005, 11:36 AM
i missed the part where someone said black equals Africa. :dunno:

but i can relate to people finding their personal culture rooted in their African heritage. and i find it admirable when folks (namely black americans) aren&#39;t ashamed to claim that part of their heritage.

759432


Okay, so when was the Blackness supposed to be snatched? I guess I missed it. American culture is a mixture of almost every country in the world because that&#39;s what America consists of.......

Chlyric Images
03-15-2005, 07:59 PM
This could&#39;ve been something so beautiful lol.

morena23
03-15-2005, 08:00 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 15 2005, 11:59 AM
This could&#39;ve been something so beautiful lol.

759458


You&#39;re right, and for that, I&#39;m going to bow out. There are a lot of people who have some really beautiful things to say, and my smart-allecky comments were unwarrented.......

Sorry. :pop:

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 08:06 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 03:31 PM
Am I any different than I was the day I was born?

And saying I did lose it - how am I supposed to have found it - by studying Africa? Why does black always equal Africa. It does not.

759419

Nope. Black doesnt equal Africa....but if your people are from there its a part of you regardless of your acknowledgement of it or not.Why dont ppl want Africa latched on to their culture? My thing I am wondering how you two became the exceptions to the rule. It simply cant be denied that being black since day 1 of Africans landing on these shores has been a struggle. Some how thru survival tactics and other influences we have morphed our own Black American culture which is just as valid as any culture from The Continent. However, that culture is defined by constant loss and gain and continuous defining and redefining, and there is nothing wrong with acknowledging that, and its nothing to be ashamed of. I just see that as a built-in feature of being Black. Nog even mentioning the constant assault on Black that still takes place.

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 08:07 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 15 2005, 03:59 PM
This could&#39;ve been something so beautiful lol.

759458

Why isnt it still? :huh:

feepee
03-15-2005, 08:11 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 01:41 PM
Okay, so when was the Blackness supposed to be snatched? I guess I missed it. American culture is a mixture of almost every country in the world because that&#39;s what America consists of.......

759442

that part in bold is very true. i agree with that. but some folks feel like their african heritage isn&#39;t getting it&#39;s just due. it&#39;s a personal thing, ya know? some of us may feel like we grew up feeling sure of ourselves and our cultures. and are fine with what they have been told down the years. that&#39;s cool.

some of us feel like part of us is missing. i think it&#39;s more metaphorically speaking when they say "taking my black back". kinda like when chrylic was talking about not being ashamed to be black. in your own personal way, you can reclaim parts of your culture in it&#39;s truth and entirety.

with regards to african heritage in particular, many of us were and still aren&#39;t told the truth about that part of our culture. i know i was made to believe that black history was just some slavery and civil rights. i&#39;ve come to learn that my black history goes far beyond what i was taught. and i think it&#39;s ok for folks to explore their africaness or whatever u want to call it. to them, african heritage is a large part of their blackness.

hope that make some sense.

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 08:12 PM
Dang what I miss while I was stirring macaronis?

and I gotta add the S cuz you know black folks add S to everythang.... :lol:

morena23
03-15-2005, 08:20 PM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 15 2005, 12:06 PM
Nope. Black doesnt equal Africa....but if your people are from there its a part of you regardless of your acknowledgement of it or not.Why dont ppl want Africa latched on to their culture? My thing I am wondering how you two became the exceptions to the rule. It simply cant be denied that being black since day 1 of Africans landing on these shores has been a struggle. Some how thru survival tactics and other influences we have morphed our own Black American culture which is just as valid as any culture from The Continent. However, that culture is defined by constant loss and gain and continuous defining and redefining, and there is nothing wrong with acknowledging that, and its nothing to be ashamed of. I just see that as a built-in feature of being Black. Nog even mentioning the constant assault on Black that still takes place.

759470


Okay, I broke my promise.

My mother is not from Africa. Neither is her mother, or her mother, or her mother. Same on my dad&#39;s side.

Africa is just not part of my culture. It&#39;s not that I&#39;m ashamed of it, but it&#39;s just not part of my culture. The watered down version that is present in America is not what I want to embrace. I am fully American. My feet have never touched African soil. This is not to say that I hate Africa or are ashamed of its people, but that way of life is not mine.

Why are people so ashamed to admit that they are American and personally know nothing about Africa?

My Blackness does not equate to the people who were brought over on ships, so it does not equate their culture. It&#39;s my own, that&#39;s who I am and that&#39;s who I&#39;m proud of. I&#39;m not going to try to claim the culture of a people who I have never laid eyes on before in my life. I am proud of the way I was raised - fully aware of who I am and where I came from.

meagan22
03-15-2005, 08:25 PM
Originally posted by feepee@Mar 15 2005, 03:11 PM
i think it&#39;s more metaphorically speaking when they say "taking my black back". kinda like when chrylic was talking about not being ashamed to be black. in your own personal way, you can reclaim parts of your culture in it&#39;s truth and entirety.
with regards to african heritage in particular, many of us were and still aren&#39;t told the truth about that part of our culture. i know i was made to believe that black history was just some slavery and civil rights. i&#39;ve come to learn that my black history goes far beyond what i was taught. and i think it&#39;s ok for folks to explore their africaness or whatever u want to call it. to them, african heritage is a large part of their blackness.
759482

this is basically what it means for me because for me to be Black is to be a person of African decent. :afro: What happened to folks in this country ain&#39;t the whole story, and I want the whole story.

leshapesha03
03-15-2005, 08:27 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 03:20 PM
Okay, I broke my promise.

My mother is not from Africa. Neither is her mother, or her mother, or her mother. Same on my dad&#39;s side.

Africa is just not part of my culture. It&#39;s not that I&#39;m ashamed of it, but it&#39;s just not part of my culture. The watered down version that is present in America is not what I want to embrace. I am fully American. My feet have never touched African soil. This is not to say that I hate Africa or are ashamed of its people, but that way of life is not mine.

Why are people so ashamed to admit that they are American and personally know nothing about Africa?

My Blackness does not equate to the people who were brought over on ships, so it does not equate their culture. It&#39;s my own, that&#39;s who I am and that&#39;s who I&#39;m proud of. I&#39;m not going to try to claim the culture of a people who I have never laid eyes on before in my life. I am proud of the way I was raised - fully aware of who I am and where I came from.

759489


Couldn&#39;t have said it better!!!!
:smil3f72836ee752e: :smil3f72836ee752e:

feepee
03-15-2005, 08:30 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 02:20 PM
Okay, I broke my promise.

My mother is not from Africa. Neither is her mother, or her mother, or her mother. Same on my dad&#39;s side.

Africa is just not part of my culture. It&#39;s not that I&#39;m ashamed of it, but it&#39;s just not part of my culture. The watered down version that is present in America is not what I want to embrace. I am fully American. My feet have never touched African soil. This is not to say that I hate Africa or are ashamed of its people, but that way of life is not mine.

Why are people so ashamed to admit that they are American and personally know nothing about Africa?

My Blackness does not equate to the people who were brought over on ships, so it does not equate their culture. It&#39;s my own, that&#39;s who I am and that&#39;s who I&#39;m proud of. I&#39;m not going to try to claim the culture of a people who I have never laid eyes on before in my life. I am proud of the way I was raised - fully aware of who I am and where I came from.

759489


*sigh* stop projecting.

i PERSONALLY know enough about certain African cultures to know that my black american culture isn&#39;t much different. and i want to learn more.

the part in bold IS your blackness. that is how black in America present day came to be that. that IS your black american culture.

but some of us still choose to identify outside of american (geographical) culture because i don&#39;t believe that it&#39;s all that i&#39;m (me, personally) about.

no one is asking you to claim the culture of another. you&#39;ve already done that by asserting how "american" you are.

Chlyric Images
03-15-2005, 08:30 PM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 15 2005, 12:07 PM
Why isnt it still? :huh:

759474


I&#39;m not saying it isn&#39;t, it&#39;s just that I&#39;ve noticed that there&#39;s alot of declarations of blackness used as rebutals in very innocent posts.

I just think that it&#39;s funny that very obviously black people tend to trip out and exclaim *So what you trying to say! I&#39;m not black?*.

Okay I&#39;mma shut up now lol before I get it.

Remember YOU ARE ALL BLACK PEOPLE.

morena23
03-15-2005, 08:32 PM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 15 2005, 12:12 PM
Dang what I miss while I was stirring macaronis?

and I gotta add the S cuz you know black folks add S to everythang.... :lol:

759483


That ain&#39;t nothing - I have cousins who call all cereal cerios because they ate cheerios for so long.

But I feel you, feeps, but if I am going to embrace 1 part of of my culture, I would have to embrace them all - all of them make up me, and I&#39;m not going to single out the African part because that&#39;s not all I&#39;m made up of.

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 08:32 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 04:20 PM
Okay, I broke my promise.

My mother is not from Africa. Neither is her mother, or her mother, or her mother. Same on my dad&#39;s side.

Africa is just not part of my culture. It&#39;s not that I&#39;m ashamed of it, but it&#39;s just not part of my culture. The watered down version that is present in America is not what I want to embrace. I am fully American. My feet have never touched African soil. This is not to say that I hate Africa or are ashamed of its people, but that way of life is not mine.

Why are people so ashamed to admit that they are American and personally know nothing about Africa?

My Blackness does not equate to the people who were brought over on ships, so it does not equate their culture. It&#39;s my own, that&#39;s who I am and that&#39;s who I&#39;m proud of. I&#39;m not going to try to claim the culture of a people who I have never laid eyes on before in my life. I am proud of the way I was raised - fully aware of who I am and where I came from.

759489



But I never said you should claim any culture in Africa, and setting foot there and your mother and grandmom not being African and you never touching African soil have absolutely nothing to do with my post.

I said in my post that we have morphed our own Black American culture, but that does not mean their arent elements of our past within that, and the two dont have to be separated. Black American culture is not exclusive or devoid of African elements regardless of whose foot sat where on what soil and what anyone chooses to call themselves. Black American culture exists because of Africa......and that really cant be denied. And what watered down version are you talking about?

Chlyric Images
03-15-2005, 08:32 PM
Originally posted by feepee@Mar 15 2005, 12:30 PM
*sigh* stop projecting.


759504



LMAO :pointlaugh: :pointlaugh: :pointlaugh: :pointlaugh: :pointlaugh:

Feepee you are hilarious.

morena23
03-15-2005, 08:35 PM
Originally posted by feepee@Mar 15 2005, 12:30 PM
*sigh* stop projecting.


the part in bold IS your blackness. that is how black in America present day came to be that. that IS your black american culture.


759504


I disagree. I am made up of Indian, African, Carribean, Irish, From my mom and dad&#39;s side. All of that mixed together has made me. I am Black, but not just because of the African Slaves. There is no such thing as Black Americans who are 100% African, so why dwell on THAT part of our being and not the other.

Does it somehow validate a life decision, like shall we say..... hair?

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 08:35 PM
Originally posted by meagan22@Mar 15 2005, 04:25 PM
this is basically what it means for me because for me to be Black is to be a person of African decent. :afro: What happened to folks in this country ain&#39;t the whole story, and I want the whole story.

759496

That is basically what it boils down........Black is a continuum and American is not its point of origin. That is bascially all I am saying, and loss is a part of that.....................whether its good or bad.


*Runs to check on boiling over pot.

librarising
03-15-2005, 08:39 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 03:35 PM
There is no such thing as Black Americans who are 100% African

759519


Incorrect.

feepee
03-15-2005, 08:43 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 02:32 PM
That ain&#39;t nothing - I have cousins who call all cereal cerios because they ate cheerios for so long.

But I feel you, feeps, but if I am going to embrace 1 part of of my culture, I would have to embrace them all - all of them make up me, and I&#39;m not going to single out the African part because that&#39;s not all I&#39;m made up of.

759509

true that. embrace &#39;em all. i&#39;m all for that. my issue (and not with YOU specifically) is how folks only seem to get they panties in a bunch when another wants to assert or relate their blackness to African (and folks let&#39;s remember it&#39;s a continent not a country) culture.

then we get folks coming out the woodworks about how "i ain&#39;t no african" and whatnot. ok, chill a minute. nobody called you african. but can I (me, myself) be associated with my african heritage without someone raining on my parade. geeezzzz... but that&#39;s just me.

i&#39;m not one for getting caught up in labels and such. while they are necessary for some folk i&#39;m learning they aren&#39;t definitive. im black amongst other things. but maybe i want to bring my blackness to the forfront (sp?) cuz many believe it should be left in the background.

morena23
03-15-2005, 08:46 PM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 15 2005, 12:32 PM
And what watered down version are you talking about?

759511


Blacks in America do not have the same culture as the slaves who were brought over from Africa. The things we have salvaged are not what they were before it came here from Africa.

pwr_puff
03-15-2005, 08:46 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 15 2005, 01:59 PM
This could&#39;ve been something so beautiful lol.

759458

i agree. it only takes one.


-well, im "Taking back my Blackness" by wearing my afro, trying to drop some knowledge on my sisters and my peers. i dont know what got some posters bent out of shape about this thread :dunno: but i enjoy learning about where i came from. i enjoy learning about the contributions that Black people made in this country. there is sooo much that is not taught.

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 08:48 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 04:46 PM
Blacks in America do not have the same culture as the slaves who were brought over from Africa. The things we have salvaged are not what they were before it came here from Africa.

759536

Thanks for saying that...........there is the LOSS I was talking about.

Chlyric Images
03-15-2005, 08:50 PM
I&#39;ll remember never to call alot of ya&#39;ll African shoot lol.

morena23
03-15-2005, 08:52 PM
Originally posted by librarising@Mar 15 2005, 12:39 PM
Incorrect.

759525


How so?

pwr_puff
03-15-2005, 08:52 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 15 2005, 02:50 PM
I&#39;ll remember never to call alot of ya&#39;ll African shoot lol.

759547

:lol:

bajanempress
03-15-2005, 08:54 PM
QUOTE(meagan22 @ Mar 15 2005, 04:25 PM)
this is basically what it means for me because for me to be Black is to be a person of African decent. What happened to folks in this country ain&#39;t the whole story, and I want the whole story.





That is basically what it boils down........Black is a continuum and American is not its point of origin. That is bascially all I am saying, and loss is a part of that.....................whether its good or bad.



Well said.

Black American culture is not something which has sprung up on its own, and has many similarities to others in the diaspora because of their common origin.

Black American dialects and food have many similarities to many of those found in the Caribbean, why? Because of our common African ancestry. I was watching a documentary on Sierra Leone, there were subtitles but I understood the speech perfectly, why because it was uncannily similar to Jamaican dialect.

I know that my experience is predeominantly West Indian but I too have to take back my black because I know that my culture although in an essence is uniquely Barbadian, it is also predominantly altered African culture.

Taking back the black should involve discovery of this ancestry because although it may not be the only heritage one may claim, it is most often the only heritage about which so little is known.

And yes I believe that a simple hair choice such as being natural is taking back the black becaues as self aware and knowledgeable as someone with chemically straightened hair may be, the choice to wear it straight most often stems from a belief that natural black hair is unmanageable, unprofessional or just plain unsightly

feepee
03-15-2005, 08:54 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 15 2005, 02:50 PM
I&#39;ll remember never to call alot of ya&#39;ll African shoot lol.

759547

you can call me African. actually i get that alot. but i find no offense in it. i don&#39;t need to go to africa to know that my roots are there. i&#39;m not ashamed of my african heritage either. the pride that folks have in their indian, irish, swedish, south american heritage is the pride i have in my african heritage.



i mean, does one need to step on a reservation to claim they got indian in their family???

librarising
03-15-2005, 08:56 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 03:52 PM
How so?

759553


If you are a second generation African in America, also an African American or a "Black American", then you in fact could be 100% African as you put it. There are also African Americans who carry the full bloodline of their ancestors minus non-African race mixing (i.e. the people of the Gullah Islands) although that is rare.

morena23
03-15-2005, 08:58 PM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 15 2005, 12:48 PM
Thanks for saying that...........there is the LOSS I was talking about.

759540


Now I see. Well, I don&#39;t feel a need to get to know the culture of the various African countries whose people "contributed" (for lack of a more dignified word) to slavery, but that is only because I don&#39;t feel that the culture that existed in Africa should be mine as by the time I was made, the African blood had been stirred around with 3 or 4 different others.

Thanks to the slave master, Indian Chief, and whoever else.

morena23
03-15-2005, 09:00 PM
Originally posted by librarising@Mar 15 2005, 12:56 PM
If you are a second generation African in America, also an African American or a "Black American", then you in fact could be 100% African as you put it. There are also African Americans who carry the full bloodline of their ancestors minus non-African race mixing (i.e. the people of the Gullah Islands) although that is rare.

759567


I should have said almost never... There I go with my extremes. :doh
I get what you mean, librarising. I wonder if half the people with the 100% African bloodline know that they are? How many people really take time to see what they are made of anymore?

Chlyric Images
03-15-2005, 09:01 PM
"Hello my African sister, how are you today?" :hug:

:Angry_boese008: "What you call me!!!" :icon_twak: "I&#39;m black !" :icon_twak:

feepee
03-15-2005, 09:02 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 15 2005, 03:01 PM
"Hello my African sister, how are you today?" :hug:

:Angry_boese008: "What you call me!!!" :icon_twak: "I&#39;m black !" :icon_twak:

759579

:pointlaugh: please stop. i&#39;m gone pee in my pants.



*ole african self, always got jokes*

pwr_puff
03-15-2005, 09:12 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 15 2005, 03:01 PM
"Hello my African sister, how are you today?" :hug:

:Angry_boese008: "What you call me!!!" :icon_twak: "I&#39;m black !" :icon_twak:

759579

-HEY! i&#39;m not black either! im West Indian,with a little bit of Cuban from my Daddy&#39;s Side! (forgive my sarcasm)
:lol: sister, U are cracking me up!

Ameka
03-15-2005, 09:29 PM
@Morena23 Girl, just take back your black. Snatch that thing up girl. I mean, you don&#39;t want to get accused of troll-ism do you? SUBMIT!!!!!!

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 09:32 PM
Originally posted by Ameka@Mar 15 2005, 05:29 PM
@Morena23 Girl, just take back your black. Snatch that thing up girl. I mean, you don&#39;t want to get accused of troll-ism do you? SUBMIT!!!!!!

759632

I love when folks cant engage in intelligent debate and showcase it for all to see. Unlike you, Morena was actually able to articulate some thoughts on the subject other then meaningless commentary. Which consequently makes me glad I decided not to engage you. :lol:

Chlyric Images
03-15-2005, 09:38 PM
Off Topic I know I know.

What is Troll-ism?

Ameka
03-15-2005, 09:38 PM
No my sistah, sister, African Queen etc.... I thank you.

Funny how you didn&#39;t say that about the other meaningless commentaries.

feepee
03-15-2005, 09:39 PM
glad i didn&#39;t have to say that AK...

pwr_puff
03-15-2005, 09:40 PM
Originally posted by Ameka@Mar 15 2005, 03:29 PM
@Morena23 Girl, just take back your black. Snatch that thing up girl. I mean, you don&#39;t want to get accused of troll-ism do you? SUBMIT!!!!!!

759632

ugh :rolleyes: nobody&#39;s trying to make anybody submit.
-this was a positve thread that yet again people take out of context. i say, if you&#39;re not interested or if it doesnt apply, dont post.

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 09:41 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 15 2005, 05:38 PM
Off Topic I know I know.

What is Troll-ism?

759643

http://members.aol.com/intwg/trolls.htm

Sunchild
03-15-2005, 09:43 PM
Originally posted by Ameka+Mar 15 2005, 05:38 PM-->
No my sistah, sister, African Queen etc.... I thank you.

Funny how you didn&#39;t say that about the other meaningless commentaries.

759644
[/b]

Read the quote below.


<!--QuoteBegin-pwr_puff@Mar 15 2005, 05:40 PM
ugh :rolleyes:[b] nobody&#39;s trying to make anybody submit.
-this was a positve thread that yet again people take out of context. i say, if you&#39;re not interested or if it doesnt apply, dont post.

759647

Ameka
03-15-2005, 09:49 PM
If that be the case, the majority of threads get taken out of context. Why? Because people differ in opinions and thought processes.

Again, you didn&#39;t say anything about any other meaningless commentaries, but since I disagreed, then I guess I am deserving of the comment you made.

No thanks.

My case is dismissed.

Urbanite
03-15-2005, 09:50 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 03:20 PM
Okay, I broke my promise.

My mother is not from Africa. Neither is her mother, or her mother, or her mother. Same on my dad&#39;s side.

Africa is just not part of my culture. It&#39;s not that I&#39;m ashamed of it, but it&#39;s just not part of my culture. The watered down version that is present in America is not what I want to embrace. I am fully American. My feet have never touched African soil. This is not to say that I hate Africa or are ashamed of its people, but that way of life is not mine.

Why are people so ashamed to admit that they are American and personally know nothing about Africa?

My Blackness does not equate to the people who were brought over on ships, so it does not equate their culture. It&#39;s my own, that&#39;s who I am and that&#39;s who I&#39;m proud of. I&#39;m not going to try to claim the culture of a people who I have never laid eyes on before in my life. I am proud of the way I was raised - fully aware of who I am and where I came from.

759489


Who mentioned anything about being ashamed of being American?

I don&#39;t think that anyone on here is trying to say that they are not American or that the American part of them should be neglected. For me, taking my Black back means learn as much as I can about the African culture that was stripped from my ancestors and try my best not to give into the Eurocentric ideals that seek to strip me of being authentic. For me, this means not altering my hair texture, learning more about African peoples, and empowering other African-Americans. This does NOT mean that pretend that I am not American or pretend that I am authentically African.

That&#39;s just stupid.

morena23
03-15-2005, 09:58 PM
Originally posted by Urbanite@Mar 15 2005, 01:50 PM
Who mentioned anything about being ashamed of being American?

I don&#39;t think that anyone on here is trying to say that they are not American or that the American part of them should be neglected. For me, taking my Black back means learn as much as I can about the African culture that was stripped from my ancestors and try my best not to give into the Eurocentric ideals that seek to strip me of being authentic. For me, this means not altering my hair texture, learning more about African peoples, and empowering other African-Americans. This does NOT mean that pretend that I am not American or pretend that I am authentically African.

That&#39;s just stupid.



759665


Who said they were ashamed of Africa? And learning more about African people will not bring you any closer to African culture than eating a Taco brings someone closer to Mexican culture.

If you are not African, why try so hard to get back to their "stripped" culture. The Africans who live in Africa&#39;s culture is not stripped - why? Because they are African.

Chlyric Images
03-15-2005, 10:04 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 01:58 PM
Who said they were ashamed of Africa? And learning more about African people will not bring you any closer to African culture than eating a Taco brings someone closer to Mexican culture.

If you are not African, why try so hard to get back to their "stripped" culture. The Africans who live in Africa&#39;s culture is not stripped - why? Because they are African.

759676


This is an interesting attempt at comparing two non-related processes.

Eating a taco is a physical act of ingesting food. You cannot gain knowledge and understanding with your taste buds.

But you can with the knowledge of the cultural practices and spirituality of your ancestors.

That is like saying you can learn by reading a book or eating a book.

bajanempress
03-15-2005, 10:12 PM
If you are not African, why try so hard to get back to their "stripped" culture. The Africans who live in Africa&#39;s culture is not stripped - why? Because they are African.

True you may not be African but you are of African descent as am I, it is important to me to know about my history and where I come from. I am not saying by any means you should deny any other cultures that you may feel a tie to because of your ancestry rather I encourage you to learn about them if you wish.

But for me, I&#39;ll take back the black because that&#39;s the part of my ancestry that is most reviled, hidden and deemed least important by most.

librarising
03-15-2005, 10:13 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 15 2005, 05:04 PM
That is like saying you can learn by reading a book or eating a book.

759681


Break it down girl.

feepee
03-15-2005, 10:23 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 03:58 PM
Who said they were ashamed of Africa? And learning more about African people will not bring you any closer to African culture than eating a Taco brings someone closer to Mexican culture.

If you are not African, why try so hard to get back to their "stripped" culture. The Africans who live in Africa&#39;s culture is not stripped - why? Because they are African.

759676

:icon_eek13: :doh

Chlyric Images
03-15-2005, 10:34 PM
Eeeerrr, well............I guess that&#39;s settled.:mellow:

Anyways Bravo to the OP for taking your black back!!! :smil3f72836ee752e: :smil3f72836ee752e: :smil3f72836ee752e: :smil3f72836ee752e: :smil3f72836ee752e: :smil3f72836ee752e:

Sweet Epiphany
03-15-2005, 10:57 PM
Originally posted by bajanempress@Mar 15 2005, 10:12 PM
True you may not be African but you are of African descent as am I, it is important to me to know about my history and where I come from. I am not saying by any means you should deny any other cultures that you may feel a tie to because of your ancestry rather I encourage you to learn about them if you wish.

But for me, I&#39;ll take back the black because that&#39;s the part of my ancestry that is most reviled, hidden and deemed least important by most.

759685


I agree, especially with the part that I&#39;ve highlighted. I do my best to give propers to my blackness as well as my Afrikaness as I find them both to be discredited and devalued.

Urbanite
03-15-2005, 11:07 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 04:58 PM
Who said they were ashamed of Africa? And learning more about African people will not bring you any closer to African culture than eating a Taco brings someone closer to Mexican culture.

If you are not African, why try so hard to get back to their "stripped" culture. The Africans who live in Africa&#39;s culture is not stripped - why? Because they are African.

759676


<span style='color:blue'>Well I agree with CI&#39;s point on this. Learning about a culture and eating a taco are not the same thing.

I don&#39;t think you really read what I wrote. I didn&#39;t say that I "try so hard to get back to their &#39;stripped&#39; culture." I said that I like to LEARN as much as I can about African cultures. Asking "if you are African, why try so hard to get back to their &#39;stripped&#39; culture," does not really make sense; if I desire to learn about a culture isn&#39;t that an acknowledgement that I am not of that culture? I am not trying to recreate an African experience here in America; that&#39;s impossible. This is not even about trying to "claim the culture of a people who I have never laid eyes on." The OP said she was taking her "Black" back, not her "African" back and she said that she desires to embrace both her African and African-American culture, as do I.</span>


...if I am going to embrace 1 part of of my culture, I would have to embrace them all - all of them make up me, and I&#39;m not going to single out the African part because that&#39;s not all I&#39;m made up of.

And who or what is stopping you? This thread, I&#39;m sure, was not an attempt to make everyone forget about their other cultural heritages and just embrace the Black. You can learn about all of the cultures that make you who you are. However, if you do not feel the need to learn about Africans, Irish, Native Americans, and whatever other cultures make up who you are, fine. But what&#39;s wrong with others doing so? :dunno:

I only know of the Black so that&#39;s what I am seeking to learn more about. If I found I tomorrow that I had Chinese relatives, you best believe I&#39;d want to learn more about that part of me.

uzuri
03-15-2005, 11:28 PM
True you may not be African but you are of African descent as am I, it is important to me to know about my history and where I come from. I am not saying by any means you should deny any other cultures that you may feel a tie to because of your ancestry rather I encourage you to learn about them if you wish.

But for me, I&#39;ll take back the black because that&#39;s the part of my ancestry that is most reviled, hidden and deemed least important by most.


I do my best to give propers to my blackness as well as my Afrikaness as I find them both to be discredited and devalued.

That is so right...I´m Afrikan and I have noticed from this site that a lot of Black people are so quick to point out how 0.1% Cherokee they are or 0.0 Irish blood :smil3f9cfa4a8d9af: But the blood that gives them their color and nappy hair they try to run away from. ;) It´s always the last one on the list...I can tell you that if they go to Ireland, they will not blend in with the people...They would not do so either among Native Americans... :pointlaugh:

Shanna
03-15-2005, 11:40 PM
Originally posted by uzuri@Mar 15 2005, 06:28 PM
That is so right...I´m Afrikan and I have noticed from this site that a lot of Black people are so quick to point out how 0.1%* Cherokee they are or 0.0 Irish blood* :smil3f9cfa4a8d9af: But the blood that gives them their color and nappy hair they try to run away from.* ;) It´s always the last one on the list...I can tell you that if they go to Ireland, they will not blend in with the people...They would not do so either among Native Americans...* :pointlaugh:

759768


Right... People act like they don&#39;t want to be associated with Africa at ALL sometimes. Like all ties are cut and nonexistent just because you were born in America. It is our point of origin. ALL of us originated in Africa. I&#39;m proud to be so visibly a part of the motherland (to be all sentimental about it :P ) and so recently descended from there that my hair looks this way and my voice sounds this way and my skin looks this way and my nose looks this way and my lips look this way.

So to the OP, I do consider wearing my hair natural as taking back my Black, reclaiming it as beautiful, worthy, and regal. Too often we want to hide anything about us that suggests Africa. Heck, too many of even want to hide anything that suggests AMERICAN BLACK. Not me, not anymore. I am a daughter of the Black continent and I am proud!

meagan22
03-16-2005, 12:49 AM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 15 2005, 03:35 PM
*Runs to check on boiling over pot.

759520

:smil3f9cf95099cff: : was your macarroni good ? http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/party/party20.gif

nappi4life
03-16-2005, 01:11 AM
Originally posted by meagan22@Mar 15 2005, 07:49 PM
:smil3f9cf95099cff: : was your macarroni good ? http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/party/party20.gif

759891


it&#39;s macaronis :)

ByHis Grace
03-16-2005, 01:27 AM
" OP" popping in and I am still ....taking it back !!! :afro:


QUOTE(bajanempress @ Mar 15 2005, 10:12 PM)

But for me, I&#39;ll take back the black because that&#39;s the part of my ancestry that is most reviled, hidden and deemed least important by most. "
END QUOTE


I fully intend to educate & expose myself and my children to our African Heritage. I refuse to have them to be ignorant or stripped of their African Ancestry.
We are in America..so we will not need to do much to add to the knowledge of the American Culture. The African Culture to "take it" , "embrace it"," nurture it " :hug: will have to be an intentional effort on our part
My children are 2nd generation Africans with a 1st generation African father.

Melanizm
03-16-2005, 02:37 AM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 15 2005, 09:01 PM
"Hello my African sister, how are you today?" :hug:

:Angry_boese008: "What you call me!!!" :icon_twak: "I&#39;m black !" :icon_twak:

759579


:lol:

QueenLocks
03-16-2005, 02:49 AM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 15 2005, 04:48 PM
Thanks for saying that...........there is the LOSS I was talking about.

759540



What I don&#39;t get is those who "WISH" to reconnect, are often criticize, ridiculed, talked about etc. {by friends, family, etc.}

Oh, and it was not Lost, it was Taken from our ancestors, to make them less than human, and more animal-like, more of a tool and slave.... Even then, some slaves passed down something from which ever Tribe/Nation they came from to their babies.

I am a "New Afrikan" {meaning, one of Afrikan decendence, who has never been to Afrika, and "Thanks to the middle passage, and slavery, our blood is a "Mixture" of various Afrikan Tribes/Nations, plus some Native Blood, and a little Euro-blood from the masters rape of Afrikan women}.

Brazen
03-16-2005, 11:22 AM
I agree with a lot of posters - mention re-identifying with the African continent and it&#39;s like calling someones mother a %£!!?. Why do we have to be SO quick to mention i&#39;m irish, i&#39;m indian, i&#39;m this i&#39;m that?

Africa seems to be a dirty word.

Now I&#39;ve been to India. Walk the streets there and they&#39;ll look at you like you&#39;re from outer space. I had one man pulling my braids as i walked past - the translator i was with explained that he thought the braids just grew out my head already braided and he&#39;d never seen such a thing before! I have friends who live in Ireland (i live in the UK which N.Ireland is part of) - go there and they&#39;ll want to touch your skin, exclaiming how beautiful it is, how UNLIKE theirs it is. Then go to Africa - no matter how detached we feel from it - that is our homeland. And the more we understand that place, the more we understand ourselves. No one is saying that&#39;s ALL we&#39;re about as black people. But it&#39;s importance in our makeup cannot be disputed.

People may not want to accept that - but it&#39;s still the truth.

bigshirle
03-16-2005, 01:18 PM
Nice post! Yeah i&#39;m taking my black back just like i&#39;m taking my credit back...lol Sista trying to get a home. But anyway, going natural and accepting my hair the way is meant to be is one way i&#39;m taking it back. Refuting ignorant azz coments made about blacks is another way. Learning about Black American, Haitian, African Heritage is another way. Honestly, I like to learn anything about black folks, no matter where they come from.

ImSoSublime
03-16-2005, 04:26 PM
I don&#39;t understand some of you people. I am multiracial. My father is "Black" and my mother is "White" and Korean. I embrace all my roots, but I don&#39;t understand why so many people are on this Africa tip! Black and white are such broad words, so they always are going to lead to disputes, My mom is half-white, but I know she is of the Italian heritage so I have no problem there. But the problem therefore is that Africa is a freaking continent, not a country. There are between 250-400 ethnic groups in Nigeria alone, so how are you to embrace your "African-ness?" What are some of you all doing??? Just selecting a random ethnic group in Africa and saying ooooh, That&#39;s what I am. I don&#39;t and most Black people in America do not have the privilege to know where exactly they came from in Africa b/c they are the descendants of the millions of were sold into slavery and/or stolen from their own land! Embrace who you are! Be proud of your family and traditions you all have! Doing a little research on African cultures, eating African foods, and wearing some African garments will make you no more Black then you were yesterday. I know a lot of you all will want to tear me a new one, but whatever! My opinion! Welcome to AMERICA!!!!!! Be proud of who YOU are, not all the other people who look like you!!!! And that&#39;s my :2cents: !!!!!!! Have a great day ladies!!!! Let&#39;s agree to disagree!!!!

Shanna
03-16-2005, 04:43 PM
My mom is half-white, but I know she is of the Italian heritage so I have no problem there. But the problem therefore is that Africa is a freaking continent, not a country. There are between 250-400 ethnic groups in Nigeria alone, so how are you to embrace your "African-ness?" What are some of you all doing??? Just selecting a random ethnic group in Africa and saying ooooh, That&#39;s what I am. I don&#39;t and most Black people in America do not have the privilege to know where exactly they came from in Africa b/c they are the descendants of the millions of were sold into slavery and/or stolen from their own land! Embrace who you are!

That&#39;s why I embrace the whole continent as best I can. ;)





<a href=\'http://www.we-the-voices.com/realtalk/archives/it_dont_matter_if_youre_black_or_white.php\' target=\'_blank\'>http://www.we-the-voices.com/realtalk/arch...ck_or_white.php</a>

morena23
03-16-2005, 04:47 PM
There is no arguing that Blacks are in America because of the slaves. They suffered what no human should have to suffer: being snatched out of their country, brought over on ships where they were packed in like sardines. They were barely fed, and when they had to relieve themselves, they did it right where they were laying. The ones that survived the trip were forced to work in a strange land where if they did make children, some were killed. Their women were raped and tortured, they had no rights, they were unable to live how they were used to living. THEIR culture was totally stripped away from them.

Almost 500 years later, here we are. We are Black Americans. To say that your African culture was stripped away from you is saying that you had it to begin with. I’m not talking about your great, great, great, great, great, great grand-mother, I’m talking about you.

There is Black all over the world “thanks” to the slave trade. Should every Black person whose country contributed to slavery suddenly forget the country they were born and raised in and take up the African culture of the slaves? Apparently so. I tend to disagree.

I am a proud BLACK American and realize that if not for the slaves I would not be here. However, the culture that they were stripped of is not mine, nor my moms or father’s, or my grandparents or my great-grandparents.

Watching a National Geographic special of Africa or writing an essay is not taking “your” culture back. This is learning World History. We Black Americans are in no way African, and I don’t understand why there is such an urgency (after the Big Chop, of course) to suddenly Identify with your African ancestors. If you want to learn, don’t go the punk azz route by “reading and studying” - go to Africa. You (generally speaking) can learn the culture first hand. Do you (generally speaking) even know the tribe who’s culture you’re trying to take back?

Learning about Africa is great. Many people wouldn’t admit that Africa and it’s history is World History – all life started there. But we’ll see how many posers on this board would live their lives in Africa if told they could. Not saying that Africa is a bad place to live, but you, as a Black American would have a hard time adjusting to any culture that is not the spoiled culture that you are used to today.

In a lot of cases, Black Americans want to identify with Africa because they feel that they themselves don’t have an identity. Why do these people give others that much power? Are you without an identity because you feel that your culture (American) lacks the “exotic” traits many others seem to have? When I go to DR, I love and appreciate their ways – it is beautiful and so much more peaceful than my own. But since I was born in America, I understand that this is my culture, no matter who in my family wasn’t born American. America does have a culture that consists of all the people who make up America. It is this culture that we were born with, and that same culture can not be taken away from us.

Pero, asi es la vida. Recuerdas: No te dejas enganar por lo que aparece hermoso. Somos todos hijos de dios y dios no se vea razas.

morena23
03-16-2005, 04:49 PM
Originally posted by ImSoSublime@Mar 16 2005, 08:26 AM
I don&#39;t understand some of you people. I am multiracial. My father is "Black" and my mother is "White" and Korean. I embrace all my roots, but I don&#39;t understand why so many people are on this Africa tip! Black and white are such broad words, so they always are going to lead to disputes, My mom is half-white, but I know she is of the Italian heritage so I have no problem there. But the problem therefore is that Africa is a freaking continent, not a country. There are between 250-400 ethnic groups in Nigeria alone, so how are you to embrace your "African-ness?" What are some of you all doing??? Just selecting a random ethnic group in Africa and saying ooooh, That&#39;s what I am. I don&#39;t and most Black people in America do not have the privilege to know where exactly they came from in Africa b/c they are the descendants of the millions of were sold into slavery and/or stolen from their own land! Embrace who you are! Be proud of your family and traditions you all have! Doing a little research on African cultures, eating African foods, and wearing some African garments will make you no more Black then you were yesterday. I know a lot of you all will want to tear me a new one, but whatever! My opinion! Welcome to AMERICA!!!!!! Be proud of who YOU are, not all the other people who look like you!!!! And that&#39;s my :2cents: !!!!!!! Have a great day ladies!!!! Let&#39;s agree to disagree!!!!

760594


:lol: Yep, like you said.

MsSankofa04
03-16-2005, 04:54 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 15 2005, 02:31 PM
Am I any different than I was the day I was born?

And saying I did lose it - how am I supposed to have found it - by studying Africa? Why does black always equal Africa. It does not.

759419



Yes studying Africa is a way of helping you understand your blackness, something alot of people have a problem with now. Everyone thinks they are from America or whatever country they are from but we are originally from Africa. Black always equals Africa because we are from Africa that is our mother land, thats where our identity was taking.
I suggest you reading Willie Lynch (I forgot the author) and watching the Movie Sankofa (which means learn form the past in order to move on to the future.
Love Peace and Hair Grease.

morena23
03-16-2005, 04:56 PM
Originally posted by MsSankofa04@Mar 16 2005, 08:54 AM
Everyone thinks they are from America or whatever country they are from

760626


Okay, stop right there - Whatever country you are from is where you are from!!

MsSankofa04
03-16-2005, 05:00 PM
Originally posted by bigshirle@Mar 16 2005, 08:18 AM
Nice post! Yeah i&#39;m taking my black back just like i&#39;m taking my credit back...lol Sista trying to get a home. But anyway, going natural and accepting my hair the way is meant to be is one way i&#39;m taking it back. Refuting ignorant azz coments made about blacks is another way. Learning about Black American, Haitian, African Heritage is another way. Honestly, I like to learn anything about black folks, no matter where they come from.

760364


:D Sap pase!
Thats whats up.
We must learn to embrace the African culture because that where we all originated from.

Shanna
03-16-2005, 05:03 PM
Almost 500 years later, here we are. We are Black Americans. To say that your African culture was stripped away from you is saying that you had it to begin with. I’m not talking about your great, great, great, great, great, great grand-mother, I’m talking about you.

Those people are a part of me. They who had their culture stripped away are why I am here. There&#39;s nothing at all wrong with acknowledging that fact. America is essentially... a rootless place for the most of us, except for the natives who were killed and put on erservations. It does have it&#39;s own CULTURE, but you, your family has roots. And if you want to sever your roots to when slavery ended, great. I&#39;m not on some trip where I want to eat African food and wear African clothes and go "back" to Africa, I just acknowledge that Africa is very much a part of me. I look like this BECAUSE I am of there. No more, no less. And I do associate wearing my hair like this with reclaiming the beauty in all of our African-inherited features. Our Black American selves have our roots in Black Africa and for most of us, we have the VISIBLE roots. What&#39;s wrong with claiming them? :dunno: If you can go "Well my mom has Italian heritage" and "My great-great grandma was Indian so my hair is wavy", why can I not go "I have my roots in Africa and I am proud?"

MsSankofa04
03-16-2005, 05:03 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 11:56 AM
Okay, stop right there - Whatever country you are from is where you are from!!

760632


Understandable but you must remember how we go there and where were we before we got there. And when I say we I mean our ancestors.

Shanna
03-16-2005, 05:05 PM
It&#39;s like in Sankofa, when the model goes to Africa and she gets dragged into the cave, she screams "I&#39;m not AFRICAN! I&#39;M AMERICAN!!!!" and what meaning did that have?

morena23
03-16-2005, 05:08 PM
Originally posted by Shanna@Mar 16 2005, 09:03 AM
"Well my mom has Italian heritage" and "My great-great grandma was Indian so my hair is wavy", why can I not go "I have my roots in Africa and I am proud?"

760644


So one of your great-great grandparents is African?

feepee
03-16-2005, 06:18 PM
Originally posted by ImSoSublime@Mar 16 2005, 10:26 AM
I don&#39;t understand some of you people. I am multiracial. My father is "Black" and my mother is "White" and Korean. I embrace all my roots, but I don&#39;t understand why so many people are on this Africa tip! Black and white are such broad words, so they always are going to lead to disputes, My mom is half-white, but I know she is of the Italian heritage so I have no problem there. But the problem therefore is that Africa is a freaking continent, not a country. There are between 250-400 ethnic groups in Nigeria alone, so how are you to embrace your "African-ness?" What are some of you all doing??? Just selecting a random ethnic group in Africa and saying ooooh, That&#39;s what I am. I don&#39;t and most Black people in America do not have the privilege to know where exactly they came from in Africa b/c they are the descendants of the millions of were sold into slavery and/or stolen from their own land! Embrace who you are! Be proud of your family and traditions you all have! Doing a little research on African cultures, eating African foods, and wearing some African garments will make you no more Black then you were yesterday. I know a lot of you all will want to tear me a new one, but whatever! My opinion! Welcome to AMERICA!!!!!! Be proud of who YOU are, not all the other people who look like you!!!! And that&#39;s my :2cents: !!!!!!! Have a great day ladies!!!! Let&#39;s agree to disagree!!!!

760594


:huh: oookkaaaaayyyy.... why is it that you refuse to WANT to learn about African countries? i guess i can&#39;t understand why you are so against me or anyone else for that matter, wanting to reconnect with the continent.

i can agree that most of us aren&#39;t able to trace back to the particular country of our ancestry. somebody please tell me i&#39;m not the only one who sees that as a problem. the problem is that we don&#39;t know. now what i see is discouragement from folks who agree with what you&#39;re saying. "we don&#39;t know so let&#39;s be happy with what we know, let’s not even try"



Doing a little research on African cultures, eating African foods, and wearing some African garments will make you no more Black then you were yesterday.
really if that&#39;s what you think it&#39;s about then i guess i can sorta see why u feel the way you do. <_<

for real, i forgot folks like this still existed. that&#39;s what i get for giving folks the benefit of the doubt. look, i&#39;m not saying you gotta do what i do (u don&#39;t even KNOW what i do, but u already assume u know) but why u gotta have an issue with how i relate MY blackness. MY heritage?

i can do nothing but laugh and shake my head at some folk. what&#39;s so wrong with asserting your blackness by acknowleging roots in Africa? no one has denied any other part of their ancestry.

but for real tho... cool, i won&#39;t call you African. :shocker: do u get a icky taste in your mouth when u say that word??

bigshirle
03-16-2005, 06:35 PM
Originally posted by MsSankofa04@Mar 16 2005, 05:00 PM
:D Sap pase!
Thats whats up.
We must learn to embrace the African culture because that where we all originated from.

760637


Map Bole piti piti (I&#39;m on fire, but just a little...lol)

Mocha-Vee
03-16-2005, 06:55 PM
This is an interesting topic. I don&#39;t feel like I&#39;m taking back my blackness, I have always been black. Nothing can change that. Even with a relaxer, you aren&#39;t considered white with naturally straight hair because when it&#39;s "touch up time" your roots show, if you know what I mean. Me going natural doesn&#39;t make me any blacker, it does help me to realize that there are other beauties in the world, beside what is displayed on tv and in Essence Magazines. I don&#39;t feel like I&#39;m taking any stance, but I let my beauty speak for itself when I get compliments about my hair or just me in general. It let&#39;s others know that we can be different, and beautiful at the same time. I think I&#39;ve always been aware about the white washing that goes on in our society, but I don&#39;t see going natural as being the end all to be all in knowing about your African roots.

But I get what you are saying. I look at this as being comfortable with myself, and accepting that I don&#39;t need to look like someone else to be recognized as beautiful. The more you show that to others, the more they will realize the same too. That&#39;s what I love about this journey.

bigshirle
03-16-2005, 07:11 PM
How come we learn about European history in school? It obvious that White America knows it has ties to Europe, the continent. It&#39;s not under Europe&#39;s rule anymore but a lot of influences remain. Why can&#39;t Blacks learn and talk about Africa, the continent? What&#39;s the big deal? Look, I&#39;m trying to learn about anything black! Discrimination, prejudice, and exploitation of Blacks is universal but it all started in Africa. Why are some Blacks quick to abandon ties to Africa? Is it because it&#39;s ppl are portrayed to be uncivilized, ungroomed, hungry, poor, savages,... what the heck is it? Funny thing is Blacks in America are portrayed to be same way. If some ppl are so uncomfortable with being tied to Africa, then put "other" on job applications when you see the "African-American" option . Obviously, some of you are just Americans and not African-Americans. Correct white ppl when they call you Afro American just say "i&#39;m American like you"!

Melanizm
03-16-2005, 07:14 PM
Originally posted by ImSoSublime@Mar 16 2005, 04:26 PM
I don&#39;t understand some of you people. I am multiracial. My father is "Black" and my mother is "White" and Korean. I embrace all my roots, but I don&#39;t understand why so many people are on this Africa tip! Black and white are such broad words, so they always are going to lead to disputes, My mom is half-white, but I know she is of the Italian heritage so I have no problem there. But the problem therefore is that Africa is a freaking continent, not a country. There are between 250-400 ethnic groups in Nigeria alone, so how are you to embrace your "African-ness?" What are some of you all doing??? Just selecting a random ethnic group in Africa and saying ooooh, That&#39;s what I am. I don&#39;t and most Black people in America do not have the privilege to know where exactly they came from in Africa b/c they are the descendants of the millions of were sold into slavery and/or stolen from their own land! Embrace who you are! Be proud of your family and traditions you all have! Doing a little research on African cultures, eating African foods, and wearing some African garments will make you no more Black then you were yesterday. I know a lot of you all will want to tear me a new one, but whatever! My opinion! Welcome to AMERICA!!!!!! Be proud of who YOU are, not all the other people who look like you!!!! And that&#39;s my :2cents: !!!!!!! Have a great day ladies!!!! Let&#39;s agree to disagree!!!!

760594


you CAN&#39;T be serious with this...why does everyone feel like Africa should just be ignored because we&#39;re in America?

In order for me to "embrace who I am", that would mean embracing Africa, would it not? Do you not embrace Italy and Korea? What if I told you to get off that Korean Italian tip because you&#39;re in AMERICA. What&#39;s wrong with black americans wanting to embrace Africa, the continent, as a whole? (...since most of us will never know from which part we are from..) Just because we can&#39;t trace it back perfectly doesn&#39;t mean we can&#39;t embrace it. Your logic is so typical...you think because someone embraces Africa that they denounce their own family history and traditions. That&#39;s BS IMO because you CAN do both.

If you&#39;re on some "proud to be an American" tip, then I can see why you think the way you do but it makes me want to throw up on myself.

feepee
03-16-2005, 07:19 PM
Originally posted by Melanizm@Mar 16 2005, 01:14 PM
If you&#39;re on some "proud to be an American" tip, then I can see why you think the way you do but it makes me want to throw up on myself.

760892

i already threw up in my mouth a little when i read


I don&#39;t understand some of you people. :huh: :doh

NLight1
03-16-2005, 07:23 PM
Originally posted by Melanizm@Mar 16 2005, 01:14 PM
you CAN&#39;T be serious with this...why does everyone feel like Africa should just be ignored because we&#39;re in America?

In order for me to "embrace who I am", that would mean embracing Africa, would it not? Do you not embrace Italy and Korea? What if I told you to get off that Korean Italian tip because you&#39;re in AMERICA. What&#39;s wrong with black americans wanting to embrace Africa, the continent, as a whole? (...since most of us will never know from which part we are from..) Just because we can&#39;t trace it back perfectly doesn&#39;t mean we can&#39;t embrace it. Your logic is so typical...you think because someone embraces Africa that they denounce their own family history and traditions. That&#39;s BS IMO because you CAN do both.

If you&#39;re on some "proud to be an American" tip, then I can see why you think the way you do but it makes me want to throw up on myself.

760892

ITA! :smil3f72836ee752e: :smil3f72836ee752e: Who would any of us be without our pasts? There is great knowledge and power in disovering your roots and your heritage. Without knowledge of your past, you have no future, so I&#39;ll proudly continue to honor and acknowledge my roots in Africa. I really can&#39;t believe the nerve of some people talking about get off that Africa tip :doh :icon_headshake: :rolleyes:

morena23
03-16-2005, 07:24 PM
Originally posted by bigshirle@Mar 16 2005, 11:11 AM
How come we learn about European history in school? It obvious that White America knows it has ties to Europe, the continent. It&#39;s not under Europe&#39;s rule anymore but a lot of influences remain. Why can&#39;t Blacks learn and talk about Africa, the continent? What&#39;s the big deal? Look, I&#39;m trying to learn about anything black! Discrimination, prejudice, and exploitation of Blacks is universal but it all started in Africa. Why are some Blacks quick to abandon ties to Africa? Is it because it&#39;s ppl are portrayed to be uncivilized, ungroomed, hungry, poor, savages,... what the heck is it? Funny thing is Blacks in America are portrayed to be some way. If some ppl are so uncomfortable with being tied to Africa, then put "other" on job applications when you see "African-American" option . Obviously, some of you are just Americans and not African-American. Correct white ppl when they call you Afro American just say "i&#39;m American like you"!

760880


1. I learned World History in School. Actually, we learned more about Africa than Europe.

2. I have never thought Africans are ungroomed, uncivilized or poor. Poverty is everywhere, not just Africa.

3. I am American. If it feels better for a White person to call me African-American, fine.... I mean it&#39;s obvious that Blacks are here because of Africans just like they are here because of Europe. But most of the applications that I fill out have Black, White, Hispanic, American Indian, etc. It has been a while since I&#39;ve seen one that says African-American or European American. I don&#39;t know of any White people who call themselves European American.

morena23
03-16-2005, 07:26 PM
Originally posted by Melanizm@Mar 16 2005, 11:14 AM

If you&#39;re on some "proud to be an American" tip, then I can see why you think the way you do but it makes me want to throw up on myself.

760892


Is there something wrong with being proud to be an American? For those who are ashamed of America - planes travel all day long.

feepee
03-16-2005, 07:28 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 01:24 PM
1. I learned World History in School. Actually, we learned more about Africa than Europe.

2. I have never thought Africans are ungroomed, uncivilized or poor. Poverty is everywhere, not just Africa.

3. I am American. If it feels better for a White person to call me African-American, fine.... I mean it&#39;s obvious that Blacks are here because of Africans just like they are here because of Europe. But most of the applications that I fill out have Black, White, Hispanic, American Indian, etc. It has been a while since I&#39;ve seen one that says African-American or European American. I don&#39;t know of any White people who call themselves European American.

760912

im gunna take a wild guess and say that World History with regards to Africa started with colonialization. i say that cuz that&#39;s what i was taught in world history in high school. your experience may have been different. i don&#39;t know. but history for Africa was only relavant in my World History course once Europeans colonialized countries there.

morena23
03-16-2005, 07:34 PM
Originally posted by feepee@Mar 16 2005, 11:28 AM
im gunna take a wild guess and say that World History with regards to Africa started with colonialization. i say that cuz that&#39;s what i was taught in world history in high school. your experience may have been different. i don&#39;t know. but history for Africa was only relavant in my World History course once Europeans colonialized countries there.

760921


My school (small town, mostly baptist) Actually focused on Africa because we were taught that is where life began. They traced many of the cities that are mentioned in the Bible back to Africa. That&#39;s why when I moved here, I was so :icon_headshake: because the schools here DID only focus on the colonization when there is so much more going on...

bigshirle
03-16-2005, 07:40 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 07:24 PM
1. I learned World History in School. Actually, we learned more about Africa than Europe.

2. I have never thought Africans are ungroomed, uncivilized or poor. Poverty is everywhere, not just Africa.

3. I am American. If it feels better for a White person to call me African-American, fine.... I mean it&#39;s obvious that Blacks are here because of Africans just like they are here because of Europe. But most of the applications that I fill out have Black, White, Hispanic, American Indian, etc. It has been a while since I&#39;ve seen one that says African-American or European American. I don&#39;t know of any White people who call themselves European American.

760912


Morena, I wasn&#39;t specifically pointing you out so don&#39;t feel like i&#39;m personally attacking you. I learned world history too but I learned from a more Europen White perspective. U could blame it on the BK school system or whatever. I&#39;m telling u, I didnt learn enough about Africa in school. I didn&#39;t even learn enough about Blacks in America. If Whites wanted to call themselves European Americans, so be it. It&#39;s their rights. I know a lot of White Americans that are quick to break down their heritage to you.

morena23
03-16-2005, 07:45 PM
Originally posted by bigshirle@Mar 16 2005, 11:40 AM
Morena, I wasn&#39;t specifically pointing you out so don&#39;t feel like i&#39;m personally attacking you. I learned world history too but I learned from a more Europen White perspective. U could blame it on the BK school system or whatever. I&#39;m telling u, I didnt learn enough about Africa in school. I didn&#39;t even learn enough about Blacks in America. If Whites wanted to call themselves European Americans, so be it. It&#39;s their rights. I know a lot of White Americans that are quick to break down their heritage to you.

760943


Don&#39;t worry, it seems like I take offense to everything, but really I don&#39;t. I just don&#39;t know when to be quiet. Nope, you are A Okay with me.... ;)

Most schools don&#39;t teach anything about Africa. It&#39;s like saying - yeah you got here because of slavery, but they hardly EVERY tell you why slavery happened, to which tribes, how the tribes got separated, NOTHING!! Have you noticed how many of the details have been left out?

Shanna
03-16-2005, 07:47 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 12:08 PM
So one of your great-great grandparents is African?

760658


Yes, my great-great-greats were Africans somewhere down the "greats" line, relatively recently. :dunno:

morena23
03-16-2005, 07:50 PM
Originally posted by Shanna@Mar 16 2005, 11:47 AM
somewhere down the "greats" line, relatively recently. :dunno:

760962


Yep, that makes you all the way African then not

^_^

NLight1
03-16-2005, 07:54 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 01:26 PM
Is there something wrong with being proud to be an American? For those who are ashamed of America - planes travel all day long.

760916

:pointlaugh: Girl you so crazy! I think what people are getting at, is why is it wrong to be proud of Africa too. That other poster said what is up with this Africa tip, like that was a bad thing, to be proud of Africa as well as America. I think her attitude, is a wrong attitude to have. I can be proud of both, without denying either.

Okay, that&#39;s my :2cents:

Melanizm
03-16-2005, 07:54 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 07:26 PM
Is there something wrong with being proud to be an American? For those who are ashamed of America - planes travel all day long.

760916


there is something wrong with being a black american and feeling like it&#39;s wrong to embrace your african roots.

for those who took offense there are computers that shut off ALL day :rolleyes:

i like how you felt the need to put your spin on what i said to further your point though. it&#39;s cute.

charli
03-16-2005, 07:57 PM
This thread is so funny. I&#39;m sure you didn&#39;t mean for it to be funny. But this one takes the cake:


Is there something wrong with being proud to be an American? For those who are ashamed of America - planes travel all day long.

American, huh?

Yeah okay so when you American can&#39;t get a job because your skin is brown and not white, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when you get paid less because your skin is brown and not because you are not a good worker, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when you buy a house and get steered towards the ghetto becuase your skin is brown and the upscale communities don&#39;t feel comfortable selling to you, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when you go shopping in a store where you don&#39;t look like you belong and the clerk has security following you around, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when your kids can&#39;t get into a specific college because they just done about accepted all the blacks they wanted for that year, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And find out just how American you really are.

And then have the nerve to tell somebody else to get on a plane.

Melanizm
03-16-2005, 07:57 PM
Originally posted by feepee@Mar 16 2005, 07:19 PM
i already threw up in my mouth a little when i read

:huh: :doh

760900


LMAO :lol:

Shanna
03-16-2005, 07:58 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 02:50 PM
Yep, that makes you all the way African then not

^_^

760969


I never said I was "all the way" African. :dunno: I&#39;m just aware that my American black self IS a part of the African diaspora. And I acknowledge myself as so.

Melanizm
03-16-2005, 07:58 PM
Originally posted by charli@Mar 16 2005, 07:57 PM
This thread is so funny. I&#39;m sure you didn&#39;t mean for it to be funny. But this one takes the cake:
American, huh?

Yeah okay so when you American can&#39;t get a job because your skin is brown and not white, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when you get paid less because your skin is brown and not because you are not a good worker, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when you buy a house and get steered towards the ghetto becuase your skin is brown and the upscale communities don&#39;t feel comfortable selling to you, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when you go shopping in a store where you don&#39;t look like you belong and the clerk has security following you around, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when your kids can&#39;t get into a specific college because they just done about accepted all the blacks they wanted for that year, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And find out just how American you really are.

And then have the nerve to tell somebody else to get on a plane.

760980



:smil3f72836ee752e:

neely
03-16-2005, 07:58 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 02:50 PM
Yep, that makes you all the way African then not

^_^

760969

nevamind girl... cause u just trynna get me warned

bigshirle
03-16-2005, 07:59 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 07:45 PM
Don&#39;t worry, it seems like I take offense to everything, but really I don&#39;t. I just don&#39;t know when to be quiet. Nope, you are A Okay with me.... ;)

Most schools don&#39;t teach anything about Africa. It&#39;s like saying - yeah you got here because of slavery, but they hardly EVERY tell you why slavery happened, to which tribes, how the tribes got separated, NOTHING!! Have you noticed how many of the details have been left out?

760956


There&#39;s an array of reasons why some Blacks want to learn more about Africa. You highlighted one. Some are curious to know what tribe they come from. What if learning what part of Africa or what tribe we belong to helps in tackling some genetic black disorders? It might be a little farfetched but hey you never :dunno: Shoot by doing some research, I may find out if I have common Sudanian or Nigerian nose. You never know. I&#39;m not saying to pack up and go live in Africa (only if you want to) but going the extra mile to learn it about can&#39;t hurt... Curiousity won&#39;t kill this cat.

morena23
03-16-2005, 07:59 PM
Originally posted by Melanizm@Mar 16 2005, 11:54 AM
there is something wrong with being a black american and feeling like it&#39;s wrong to embrace your african roots.

for those who took offense there are computers that shut off ALL day :rolleyes:

i like how you felt the need to put your spin on what i said to further your point though. it&#39;s cute.

760975


Now Mel.... You know I never get offended

Unless somebody talks about my JEEESUS - or my chicken.

I was just kidding (kind of, okay, I wasn&#39;t)

Don&#39;t get me wrong, I love Africa - but no more than I love all the people on the other continents. I am coming to understand (slowly) that some people feel more of a connection with Africa, but I feel that connection with everyone in general

Especially you.....

morena23
03-16-2005, 08:02 PM
Originally posted by bigshirle@Mar 16 2005, 11:59 AM
There&#39;s an array of reasons why some Blacks want to learn more about Africa. You highlighted one. Some are curious to know what tribe they come from. What if learning what part of Africa or what tribe we belong to helps in tackling some genetic black disorders? It might be a little farfetched but hey you never :dunno: Shoot by doing some research, I may find out if I have common Sudanian or Nigerian nose. You never know. I&#39;m not saying to pack up and go live in Africa (only if you want to) but going the extra mile to learn it about can&#39;t hurt... Curiousity won&#39;t kill this cat.

760987


Right - I have a friend who was adopted who found out that her parents were both Olympic track runners from Nigeria. Do you know she was a track star in her school?

morena23
03-16-2005, 08:07 PM
Originally posted by charli@Mar 16 2005, 11:57 AM
This thread is so funny. I&#39;m sure you didn&#39;t mean for it to be funny. But this one takes the cake:
American, huh?

Yeah okay so when you American can&#39;t get a job because your skin is brown and not white, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when you get paid less because your skin is brown and not because you are not a good worker, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when you buy a house and get steered towards the ghetto becuase your skin is brown and the upscale communities don&#39;t feel comfortable selling to you, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when you go shopping in a store where you don&#39;t look like you belong and the clerk has security following you around, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And when your kids can&#39;t get into a specific college because they just done about accepted all the blacks they wanted for that year, say "but I&#39;m an American."

And find out just how American you really are.

And then have the nerve to tell somebody else to get on a plane.

760980


GTFOOHWTBS......

I get paid almost $5,000 more a year than the White Girl who has a degree with the exact same job. Why? Because I&#39;m the bomb at what I do.

I&#39;ve never been followed in a store (maybe I don&#39;t look as "suspicious" as you)

When my sister bought her house, the only ones she were shown were the ones in the "White Neighborhoods"

And we are Black American. Sorry, but every Black person ain&#39;t discriminated against. Well, I haven&#39;t been yet. Maybe I&#39;m still young....

lovinblackness
03-16-2005, 08:10 PM
Originally posted by Shanna@Mar 16 2005, 04:43 PM
That&#39;s why I embrace the whole continent as best I can. ;)
<a href=\'http://www.we-the-voices.com/realtalk/archives/it_dont_matter_if_youre_black_or_white.php\' target=\'_blank\'>http://www.we-the-voices.com/realtalk/arch...ck_or_white.php</a>

760610



Ok

A) Linguists have found that there are many links between Ebonics and West African languages demonstrating the link between African Americans and Africa is more than black skin and nappy hair.

B) There ARE features that are common to European cultures. Just because a place is a continent doesn&#39;t mean that there aren&#39;t attitudes and ideas, means of expression etc that aren&#39;t common to people of that continent. Ever heard of "western" culture vs. "eastern" there are real similarities in how people view the world and react to things that are based on the kind of interaction they have had with their environment and one another. To pretend otherwise is to ignore or be IGNORant of a great deal of fascinating and worthwhile social scientific study.

I&#39;m a proud AFRICAN woman. I think we need to visit Dr. Maya for a cure. Take one of these and call me in the am.


You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I&#39;ll rise.
Does my sassiness upset you?
why are you beset with gloom?
&#39;Cause I walk like I&#39;ve got oil wells
pumping in my living room.
Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I&#39;ll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops.
Weakened by my soulful cries.
Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don&#39;t you take it awful hard
&#39;Cause I laugh like I&#39;ve got gold mines
Diggin&#39; in my own backyard.
You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
you may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I&#39;ll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?
does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I&#39;ve got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?
Out of the huts of history&#39;s shame
I rise
Up from a past that&#39;s rooted in pain
I rise
I&#39;m a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.
Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that&#39;s wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise

I rise
I rise

CrazeeDCoil
03-16-2005, 08:10 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 07:45 PM
Most schools don&#39;t teach anything about Africa. It&#39;s like saying - yeah you got here because of slavery, but they hardly EVERY tell you why slavery happened, to which tribes, how the tribes got separated, NOTHING!! Have you noticed how many of the details have been left out?
760956


I think that&#39;s all people are looking to know. I want to know how I and my family got to this country, to know what part of africa if not which village I came from. Perhaps I am made of many parts of africa. This gives me all the justification I need to find out more about Africa. This does not mean by my education or desire for knoweledge that I am appropriating and "becoming one" with the many varied cultures of Africa. But it does give me a better understanding of my (and my ancestors) impact on the world and the culture that I currently inhabit.

Sunchild
03-16-2005, 08:10 PM
Originally posted by NLight1@Mar 16 2005, 03:23 PM
ITA! :smil3f72836ee752e: :smil3f72836ee752e: Who would any of us be without our pasts? There is great knowledge and power in disovering your roots and your heritage. Without knowledge of your past, you have no future, so I&#39;ll proudly continue to honor and acknowledge my roots in Africa. I really can&#39;t believe the nerve of some people talking about get off that Africa tip :doh :icon_headshake: :rolleyes:

760909

Exactly.


And the name of this post is TAKING MY BLACK BACK.

So listing your pedigree here is null and void because no one gives a hoot if you are 1/34454345345 indian from the Buntootight tribe. :rolleyes: This post is about BLACK, so if you are 5% black we are talking about THAT 5%. And I cant believe people who have been gentically modified and have a slim chance of tracing their family roots back past the 1700s act like they havent lost anything. :rolleyes:

lovinblackness
03-16-2005, 08:18 PM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 16 2005, 08:10 PM
Exactly.
And the name of this post is TAKING MY BLACK BACK.

So listing your pedigree here is null and void because no one gives a hoot if you are 1/34454345345 indian from the Buntootight tribe. :rolleyes: This post is about BLACK, so if you are 5% black we are talking about THAT 5%. And I cant believe people who have been gentically modified and have a slim chance of tracing their family roots back past the 1700s act like they havent lost anything. :rolleyes:

761017



Girl yes. Here we are on a board for women with NAPPY hair, not curly hair, NAPPY hair mostly nappy/b hair. There are people across the world with black skin, but that kind of nap is AFRICAN baby. We ain&#39;t talkin about the 1/16th white that gave you green eyes or yellah skin, we talking &#39;bout the african that gave you enough melanin and that gorgeous double-helix like coil in your hair that makes you recognizable all over the world as a daughter of AFRICA.

Melanizm
03-16-2005, 08:20 PM
Originally posted by afrikankween@Mar 16 2005, 08:10 PM
Exactly.
And the name of this post is TAKING MY BLACK BACK.

So listing your pedigree here is null and void because no one gives a hoot if you are 1/34454345345 indian from the Buntootight tribe. :rolleyes: This post is about BLACK, so if you are 5% black we are talking about THAT 5%. And I cant believe people who have been gentically modified and have a slim chance of tracing their family roots back past the 1700s act like they havent lost anything. :rolleyes:

761017


basically!

bigshirle
03-16-2005, 08:32 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 08:07 PM
GTFOOHWTBS......

I get paid almost $5,000 more a year than the White Girl who has a degree with the exact same job. Why? Because I&#39;m the bomb at what I do.

I&#39;ve never been followed in a store (maybe I don&#39;t look as "suspicious" as you)

When my sister bought her house, the only ones she were shown were the ones in the "White Neighborhoods"

And we are Black American. Sorry, but every Black person ain&#39;t discriminated against. Well, I haven&#39;t been yet. Maybe I&#39;m still young....

761009


Just because you didn&#39;t get followed around a store on Tuesday doesn&#39;t mean you won&#39;t get followed on Wednesday. Until I reached a certain age, I thought I was never discriminated against too. I wised up! Okay, you never been personal discriminated against? Don&#39;t worry, there are laws out specifically discriminating against you. How can you make such comments?

morena23
03-16-2005, 08:48 PM
Originally posted by bigshirle@Mar 16 2005, 12:32 PM
Just because you didn&#39;t get followed around a store on Tuesday doesn&#39;t mean you won&#39;t get followed on Wednesday. Until I reached a certain age, I thought I was never discriminated against too. I wised up! Okay, you never been personal discriminated against? Don&#39;t worry, there are laws out specifically discriminating against you. How can you make such comments?

761072


Because I&#39;ve never been discriminated against. I know it exists, but I haven&#39;t heard about it recently from anyone I know, and my entire social circle consists of minorities. Maybe we don&#39;t see it. I don&#39;t know. I&#39;ve been discriminated against moreso for being a woman (among men) than I have for my color.

charli
03-16-2005, 09:02 PM
GTFOOHWTBS......

I get paid almost $5,000 more a year than the White Girl who has a degree with the exact same job. Why? Because I&#39;m the bomb at what I do.

I&#39;ve never been followed in a store (maybe I don&#39;t look as "suspicious" as you)

When my sister bought her house, the only ones she were shown were the ones in the "White Neighborhoods"

And we are Black American. Sorry, but every Black person ain&#39;t discriminated against. Well, I haven&#39;t been yet. Maybe I&#39;m still young....

And that, people, is the epitome of the point clearly being missed.


And don&#39;t try and insult my looks, hon, because I look dayum good.

charli
03-16-2005, 09:04 PM
Okay, you never been personal discriminated against? Don&#39;t worry, there are laws out specifically discriminating against you. How can you make such comments?


Because if one black person makes more than a white person, it negates the reality that as a collective blacks make less than their white counterparts. See, the one exception entirely negates the rule, didn&#39;t you know.

morena23
03-16-2005, 09:26 PM
Originally posted by charli@Mar 16 2005, 01:02 PM
And don&#39;t try and insult my looks, hon, because I look dayum good.

761104


Did I say you didn&#39;t?

We all know you da shiznit.

Sorry, I just don&#39;t feel very discriminated against as a Black female.

Melanizm
03-16-2005, 09:42 PM
wow. just wow...

lovinblackness
03-16-2005, 10:42 PM
Originally posted by Melanizm+Mar 16 2005, 09:42 PM-->
wow. just wow...

761147
[/b]

<!--QuoteBegin-Melanizm@Mar 16 2005, 09:42 PM
wow. just wow...

761147




I was listening to a black man on the radio. An old brotha who grew up in the south. He could only write his name and had almost no education. He told the story of a white doctor in his small town who, in his words, "took a likin&#39; to him" and let him sleep on a cot and fed him in exchange for running errands, cooking, cleaning and doing everything the white man asked him. Sounds kinda like slavery huh? Anyway, that white man had a friend who was a retired school teacher who asked if he could teach the black boy how to read. The doctor said sure, but told the teacher she could only teach him three words. He learned his first name and two other words I can&#39;t remember. He then said (w/o a hint of sarcasm in his voice) "so dat jus goes ta show ya that all white folk ain&#39;t bad, dere&#39;s some good white folks out there" or some such thing.

Urbanite
03-16-2005, 10:57 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 11:47 AM
There is no arguing that Blacks are in America because of the slaves. They suffered what no human should have to suffer: being snatched out of their country, brought over on ships where they were packed in like sardines. They were barely fed, and when they had to relieve themselves, they did it right where they were laying. The ones that survived the trip were forced to work in a strange land where if they did make children, some were killed. Their women were raped and tortured, they had no rights, they were unable to live how they were used to living. THEIR culture was totally stripped away from them.

Almost 500 years later, here we are. We are Black Americans. To say that your African culture was stripped away from you is saying that you had it to begin with. I’m not talking about your great, great, great, great, great, great grand-mother, I’m talking about you.

There is Black all over the world “thanks” to the slave trade. Should every Black person whose country contributed to slavery suddenly forget the country they were born and raised in and take up the African culture of the slaves? Apparently so. I tend to disagree.

I am a proud BLACK American and realize that if not for the slaves I would not be here. However, the culture that they were stripped of is not mine, nor my moms or father’s, or my grandparents or my great-grandparents.

Watching a National Geographic special of Africa or writing an essay is not taking “your” culture back. This is learning World History. We Black Americans are in no way African, and I don’t understand why there is such an urgency (after the Big Chop, of course) to suddenly Identify with your African ancestors. If you want to learn, don’t go the punk azz route by “reading and studying” - go to Africa. You (generally speaking) can learn the culture first hand. Do you (generally speaking) even know the tribe who’s culture you’re trying to take back?

Learning about Africa is great. Many people wouldn’t admit that Africa and it’s history is World History – all life started there. But we’ll see how many posers on this board would live their lives in Africa if told they could. Not saying that Africa is a bad place to live, but you, as a Black American would have a hard time adjusting to any culture that is not the spoiled culture that you are used to today.

In a lot of cases, Black Americans want to identify with Africa because they feel that they themselves don’t have an identity. Why do these people give others that much power? Are you without an identity because you feel that your culture (American) lacks the “exotic” traits many others seem to have? When I go to DR, I love and appreciate their ways – it is beautiful and so much more peaceful than my own. But since I was born in America, I understand that this is my culture, no matter who in my family wasn’t born American. America does have a culture that consists of all the people who make up America. It is this culture that we were born with, and that same culture can not be taken away from us.

Pero, asi es la vida. Recuerdas: No te dejas enganar por lo que aparece hermoso. Somos todos hijos de dios y dios no se vea razas.

760616


<span style='color:blue'>Please show me the post where someone said that we should forget about the country we were born and raised in. Please. I&#39;ve been waiting to see this.

I always wanted to know where my ancestors were from. It&#39;s not to gain some sense of identity (so now we&#39;re analyzing each other?) or to be "exotic. " I just think it&#39;s interesting that White Americans usually know where they come from and I thought it would be cool to know too. Then, I met a group of people from the Igbo tribe, a tribe in Nigeria, and they exclaimed that I looked like them...one of the girls in the group could have been my twin! So I saw that as a surprise from God. I am EXTREMELY proud of my people here in America and would never cut that part of me off.
</span>



But the problem therefore is that Africa is a freaking continent, not a country. There are between 250-400 ethnic groups in Nigeria alone, so how are you to embrace your "African-ness?"


<span style='color:blue'>ImSoSublime...ummm...the name of the thread is "taking my black back." Not "African-ness." B-L-A-C-K. If I want to learn all that I can about Africa, what&#39;s it to anyone else? I want to learn all I can about African-American people because I didn&#39;t learn as much as I wanted to in school. So do you have a problem with this too? Or is this okay because it&#39;s learning about Americans? :rolleyes:

</span>

Urbanite
03-16-2005, 11:00 PM
Originally posted by lovinblackness@Mar 16 2005, 05:42 PM
I was listening to a black man on the radio. An old brotha who grew up in the south. He could only write his name and had almost no education. He told the story of a white doctor in his small town who, in his words, "took a likin&#39; to him" and let him sleep on a cot and fed him in exchange for running errands, cooking, cleaning and doing everything the white man asked him. Sounds kinda like slavery huh? Anyway, that white man had a friend who was a retired school teacher who asked if he could teach the black boy how to read. The doctor said sure, but told the teacher she could only teach him three words. He learned his first name and two other words I can&#39;t remember. He then said (w/o a hint of sarcasm in his voice) "so dat jus goes ta show ya that all white folk ain&#39;t bad, dere&#39;s some good white folks out there" or some such thing.

761219


<span style='color:blue'>???? :icon_eek13:

No one said "all white folk" are bad...
</span>

morena23
03-16-2005, 11:00 PM
Originally posted by Urbanite@Mar 16 2005, 02:57 PM
<span style='color:blue'>Please show me the post where someone said that we should forget about the country we were born and raised in. Please. I&#39;ve been waiting to see this.

I didn&#39;t say anyone did. Show me where I said anyone did. I&#39;ve been waiting to see this...

I always wanted to know where my ancestors were from. It&#39;s not to gain some sense of identity (so now we&#39;re analyzing each other?) or to be "exotic. " I just think it&#39;s interesting that White Americans usually know where they come from and I thought it would be cool to know too. Then, I met a group of people from the Igbo tribe, a tribe in Nigeria, and they exclaimed that I looked like them...one of the girls in the group could have been my twin! So I saw that as a surprise from God. I am EXTREMELY proud of people here in America and would never cut that part of me off.

I&#39;ve seen a girl from India who looked like me, I must be Indian.....[/B]

</span>
<span style='color:blue'>ImSoSublime...ummm...the name of the thread is "taking my black back." Not "African-ness." B-L-A-C-K. If I want to learn all that I can about Africa, what&#39;s it to anyone else? I want to learn all I can about African-American people because I didn&#39;t learn as much as I wanted to in school. So do you have a problem with this too? Or is this okay because it&#39;s learning about Americans? :rolleyes:

[B]Thanks. I know how to spell. I don&#39;t care what you learn about. Why are you trying to justify yourself. If you wanna study, study. Knowledge is power.
</span>

761245

lovinblackness
03-16-2005, 11:07 PM
Originally posted by Urbanite@Mar 16 2005, 11:00 PM
<span style='color:blue'>???? :icon_eek13:

No one said "all white folk" are bad...
</span>

761251



That wasn&#39;t my point. My point was the black man could not see the huge injustice this man was doing to him all he could see was the little bit of "kindness" the white man was offering. Some black folks who are satisfied with getting a cherry from the pie while being prevented from having their rightful slice, or the whole damned pie.

Urbanite
03-16-2005, 11:14 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 06:00 PM
Please show me the post where someone said that we should forget about the country we were born and raised in. Please. I&#39;ve been waiting to see this.

I didn&#39;t say anyone did. Show me where I said anyone did. I&#39;ve been waiting to see this...

I always wanted to know where my ancestors were from. It&#39;s not to gain some sense of identity (so now we&#39;re analyzing each other?) or to be "exotic. " I just think it&#39;s interesting that White Americans usually know where they come from and I thought it would be cool to know too. Then, I met a group of people from the Igbo tribe, a tribe in Nigeria, and they exclaimed that I looked like them...one of the girls in the group could have been my twin! So I saw that as a surprise from God. I am EXTREMELY proud of people here in America and would never cut that part of me off.

I&#39;ve seen a girl from India who looked like me, I must be Indian.....


ImSoSublime...ummm...the name of the thread is "taking my black back." Not "African-ness." B-L-A-C-K. If I want to learn all that I can about Africa, what&#39;s it to anyone else? I want to learn all I can about African-American people because I didn&#39;t learn as much as I wanted to in school. So do you have a problem with this too? Or is this okay because it&#39;s learning about Americans?

Thanks. I know how to spell. I don&#39;t care what you learn about. Why are you trying to justify yourself. If you wanna study, study. Knowledge is power.


761254



Morena, you said, on page 5:


Should every Black person whose country contributed to slavery suddenly forget the country they were born and raised in and take up the African culture of the slaves? Apparently so.

<span style='color:blue'>If no one said this, why did you bring it up? How is this "apparently so"? Did you mention that for some other reason?

Also, did I say I was Nigerian? Or I am Igbo? There you go with your extremes again. I don&#39;t know how many times I can say it: I&#39;m African-American. I know that. But I also know that many slaves were taken from West Africa, not from India. If I saw an Indian chick whom looked like me I would never assume I was Indian or that my ancestors came from there. I said a bunch of Igbos, who come from a place my ancestors may have come from, said I looked like them. A little surprise for me, that&#39;s all.

And the part of my post where I spelled "BLACK" and mentioned my studies was not for you. Read it again. Slowly.</span>

Urbanite
03-16-2005, 11:15 PM
Originally posted by lovinblackness@Mar 16 2005, 06:07 PM
That wasn&#39;t my point. My point was the black man could not see the huge injustice this man was doing to him all he could see was the little bit of "kindness" the white man was offering. Some black folks who are satisfied with getting a cherry from the pie while being prevented from having their rightful slice, or the whole damned pie.

761264


I agree. :)

morena23
03-16-2005, 11:35 PM
Originally posted by Urbanite@Mar 16 2005, 03:14 PM
Morena, you said, on page 5:
<span style='color:blue'>If no one said this, why did you bring it up? How is this "apparently so"? Did you mention that for some other reason?

Also, did I say I was Nigerian? Or I am Igbo? There you go with your extremes again. I don&#39;t know how many times I can say it: I&#39;m African-American. I know that. But I also know that many slaves were taken from West Africa, not from India. If I saw an Indian chick whom looked like me I would never assume I was Indian or that my ancestors came from there. I said a bunch of Igbos, who come from a place my ancestors may have come from, said I looked like them. A little surprise for me, that&#39;s all.

And the part of my post where I spelled "BLACK" and mentioned my studies was not for you. Read it again. Slowly.</span>

761280


I was making a point.... I didn&#39;t say anyone had previously brought it up. This is an open discussion, right?

*sigh*

Did I say you were Nigerian? You sure do assume a lot.
Relax, Relate, Release.... still very good advice.

morena23
03-17-2005, 12:00 AM
Originally posted by CrazeeDCoil@Mar 16 2005, 12:10 PM
I think that&#39;s all people are looking to know. I want to know how I and my family got to this country, to know what part of africa if not which village I came from. Perhaps I am made of many parts of africa. This gives me all the justification I need to find out more about Africa. This does not mean by my education or desire for knoweledge that I am appropriating and "becoming one" with the many varied cultures of Africa. But it does give me a better understanding of my (and my ancestors) impact on the world and the culture that I currently inhabit.

761015


I think it would be neat if people could trace the tribes back to them. How many Black people have a mixture of tribes running through their veins?

African genes are very dominant. Look at the other places where the slave trade was rampant. Even now, we have people all over the world with kinky hair, full lips and noses - I mean this blood is strong.

Sacral
03-17-2005, 12:30 AM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 08:00 PM
I think it would be neat if people could trace the tribes back to them. How many Black people have a mixture of tribes running through their veins?

761351


We can :)

www.AfricanAncestory.com (http://)

:D

Sacral

lovinblackness
03-17-2005, 12:33 AM
the link isnt working

lovinblackness
03-17-2005, 12:34 AM
ok here is the link http://www.africanancestry.com/

Sacral
03-17-2005, 12:38 AM
Originally posted by lovinblackness@Mar 16 2005, 08:33 PM
the link isnt working

761404


Try this again. It works for me.

www.africanancestory.com (http://www.africanancestry.com)

- Sacral

SweetAfrica
03-17-2005, 01:07 AM
The "I&#39;m black not African" discussions are always hot on the boards.

My view is that regardless of where you are in the diaspora, if you consider yourself black you are African. A "Chinese" person born and raised in the Caribbean (and has many generations in the Caribbean) is still Asian... to me, and most of the world... or maybe Asian Caribbean. I have never heard an Asian man or woman proclaim that they were not Asian, in my experience they would instead refer to themselves as Chinese-Trini or whatever the case may be.

Anyway, to answer the original question:


Originally posted by ByHis Grace@Jan 15 2005, 09:57 AM
...one way is by wearing my hair the way God gave it to me...
embracing the nap...realizing that my hair is not broken,,does not need to be fixed, just cared for.
I am , "Taking my Black Back" by embracing my African as well as my African American Culture. I am teaching my children....and when given opportunity I share with others.

Any Thoughts...Has this thought ever occurred to you ,to
" Take It Back??"

675767


Going natural after years of relaxing my hair definitely made me feel like I was reclaiming that aspect of my Blackness or "Africaness".

I&#39;m also relearning Ga, the language of my parents and going by my birth name which happens to be a Ga name.

bajanempress
03-17-2005, 01:26 AM
I think some people are missing the OP&#39;s point. If you feel that you have never lost your black I am really happy for you but when I look around and see how black people are discriminated against, how we receive the worst educations (in America), how we are expected to fail, how our features are reviled and how the culture of our ancestors has been lost to us, I think there is a need to take back the black.


Learning about Africa and African cultures is one way but there are other ways I do it, by participating in outreach programs exposing minority kids to sciences, encouraging them to reach higher. Instilling in the children around me that black is beautiful all of that is taking back my black.


All of you who feel you have no black to take back and no connections with Africa are welcome to feel that way but please don&#39;t deny that I may have such a connection.

Urbanite
03-17-2005, 02:37 AM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 06:35 PM
I was making a point.... I didn&#39;t say anyone had previously brought it up. This is an open discussion, right?

*sigh*

Did I say you were Nigerian? You sure do assume a lot.
Relax, Relate, Release.... still very good advice.

761311



<span style='color:blue'>What was your point, sis? If you say, "Should every Black person whose country contributed to slavery suddenly forget the country they were born and raised in and take up the African culture of the slaves? Apparently so," you appear to be addressing someone or some idea that was made before your statement. There is no way around that. If, however, you were making a point, as you say, can you address the point now? What was your point?</span>


I&#39;ve seen a girl from India who looked like me, I must be Indian...

<span style='color:blue'>Okay, so I guess you were making a point here too. This had nothing to do with what I said, you just said it. lol...do you really believe that? Or are you joking? Again, if you were making a point, please make it now. I could do the same tap dance with my words and say, "Did I say you said I was Nigerian?" (because I really didn&#39;t say you said it, if you look closely) but I respect your intelligence too much for that. </span>


Relax, Relate, Release.... still very good advice.

Sure is. You should try it some time.


All of you who feel you have no black to take back and no connections with Africa are welcome to feel that way but please don&#39;t deny that I may have such a connection.

Thank you for taking the words out of my mouth, Bajanempress!

meagan22
03-17-2005, 04:49 AM
Originally posted by lovinblackness@Mar 16 2005, 03:10 PM
B) There ARE features that are common to European cultures. Just because a place is a continent doesn&#39;t mean that there aren&#39;t attitudes and ideas, means of expression etc that aren&#39;t common to people of that continent. Ever heard of "western" culture vs. "eastern" there are real similarities in how people view the world and react to things that are based on the kind of interaction they have had with their environment and one another. To pretend otherwise is to ignore or be IGNORant of a great deal of fascinating and worthwhile social scientific study.
761014

*cough*Diop&#39;s Two Cradle Theory*cough*

Sacral
03-17-2005, 04:58 AM
Originally posted by meagan22@Mar 17 2005, 12:49 AM
*cough*Diop&#39;s Two Cradle Theory*cough*

761795


:pointlaugh: Yes, Cheikh Anta Diop.

You ain&#39;t right :lol:

- Sacral

lovinblackness
03-17-2005, 05:06 AM
Originally posted by meagan22@Mar 17 2005, 04:49 AM
*cough*Diop&#39;s Two Cradle Theory*cough*

761795



Uh hell naw. That is NOT what I meant. :lol: :icon_headshake:

onyxspirals
03-17-2005, 05:32 AM
Gotta go to sleep. I&#39;m coming back tomorrow to finish reading. Very interesting. Curious to see if the thread ever gets back to its original topic!

Brazen
03-17-2005, 11:47 AM
i think that this discussion is so so so sad. no other ethnic minority in the world feels such an indifference to their heritage. by denying the need to at least endeavour to find some links with the continent we sprung from (however futile that search may be) we have the slave masters laughing in their graves. we&#39;re finishing their job for them. :icon_headshake:

morena23
03-17-2005, 01:29 PM
Originally posted by Urbanite@Mar 16 2005, 06:37 PM
<span style='color:blue'>What was your point, sis? If you say, "Should every Black person whose country contributed to slavery suddenly forget the country they were born and raised in and take up the African culture of the slaves? Apparently so," you appear to be addressing someone or some idea that was made before your statement. There is no way around that. If, however, you were making a point, as you say, can you address the point now? What was your point?</span>
<span style='color:blue'>Okay, so I guess you were making a point here too. This had nothing to do with what I said, you just said it. lol...do you really believe that? Or are you joking? Again, if you were making a point, please make it now. I could do the same tap dance with my words and say, "Did I say you said I was Nigerian?" (because I really didn&#39;t say you said it, if you look closely) but I respect your intelligence too much for that. </span>
Sure is. You should try it some time.
Thank you for taking the words out of my mouth, Bajanempress!


761612


Like I said, this is an open discussion. The points I bring up do not have to be relevant to you.......

Nappilocs
03-17-2005, 02:16 PM
Originally posted by Melanizm@Mar 16 2005, 07:14 PM
you CAN&#39;T be serious with this...why does everyone feel like Africa should just be ignored because we&#39;re in America?

In order for me to "embrace who I am", that would mean embracing Africa, would it not? Do you not embrace Italy and Korea? What if I told you to get off that Korean Italian tip because you&#39;re in AMERICA. What&#39;s wrong with black americans wanting to embrace Africa, the continent, as a whole? (...since most of us will never know from which part we are from..) Just because we can&#39;t trace it back perfectly doesn&#39;t mean we can&#39;t embrace it. Your logic is so typical...you think because someone embraces Africa that they denounce their own family history and traditions. That&#39;s BS IMO because you CAN do both.

If you&#39;re on some "proud to be an American" tip, then I can see why you think the way you do but it makes me want to throw up on myself.

760892

:smil3f72836ee752e:
It’ s obvious that many of us are not 100% African.
Also, the more I do to connect with my African heritage, the more I learn about myself. It feels natural. There are so many things that we do in all aspects of our life today that are directly connected with the continent and many of us don’t even know it. It still trips me out when I learn a 1000 year old African dance step that looks exactly like something I saw in a hip hop video. It cracks me up when I hear Christians diss African traditional religions and then they go to church and practice many of the rituals that come directly from ATR.
Anyway, If you don’t want to connect with your African heritage, that’s on you, but don’t knock those who do.
I think that you should try to embrace as many of your ethnicities that can.

morena23
03-17-2005, 02:20 PM
Originally posted by Nappilocs@Mar 17 2005, 06:16 AM
:smil3f72836ee752e:
It cracks me up when I hear Christians diss African traditional religions and then they go to church and practice many of the rituals that come directly from ATR.

762140


Christians don&#39;t diss ATR, half of what we do stems from that. Where do you think the holy dance came from?????

Where is the Holy Dance Smiley???

CrazeeDCoil
03-17-2005, 02:51 PM
Originally posted by Brazen@Mar 17 2005, 11:47 AM
i think that this discussion is so so so sad. no other ethnic minority in the world feels such an indifference to their heritage. by denying the need to at least endeavour to find some links with the continent we sprung from (however futile that search may be) we have the slave masters laughing in their graves. we&#39;re finishing their job for them. :icon_headshake:

762011



Basically. I&#39;m really not sure why this is even a debate. it&#39;s kind of embarassing really. It just comes across as shame of our heritage.
This whole thread has me :icon_headshake: and :dunno:

MsSankofa04
03-17-2005, 02:57 PM
Originally posted by SweetAfrica@Mar 16 2005, 08:07 PM
The "I&#39;m black not African" discussions are always hot on the boards.

My view is that regardless of where you are in the diaspora, if you consider yourself black you are African. A "Chinese" person born and raised in the Caribbean (and has many generations in the Caribbean) is still Asian... to me, and most of the world... or maybe Asian Caribbean. I have never heard an Asian man or woman proclaim that they were not Asian, in my experience they would instead refer to themselves as Chinese-Trini or whatever the case may be.

Anyway, to answer the original question:
Going natural after years of relaxing my hair definitely made me feel like I was reclaiming that aspect of my Blackness or "Africaness".

I&#39;m also relearning Ga, the language of my parents and going by my birth name which happens to be a Ga name.

761462


:smil3f72836ee752e: Encore Sister Encore :smil3f72836ee752e:

Lotuswoman
03-17-2005, 03:02 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 16 2005, 04:47 PM
There is no arguing that Blacks are in America because of the slaves. They suffered what no human should have to suffer: being snatched out of their country, brought over on ships where they were packed in like sardines. They were barely fed, and when they had to relieve themselves, they did it right where they were laying. The ones that survived the trip were forced to work in a strange land where if they did make children, some were killed. Their women were raped and tortured, they had no rights, they were unable to live how they were used to living. THEIR culture was totally stripped away from them.

Almost 500 years later, here we are. We are Black Americans. To say that your African culture was stripped away from you is saying that you had it to begin with. I’m not talking about your great, great, great, great, great, great grand-mother, I’m talking about you.

There is Black all over the world “thanks” to the slave trade. Should every Black person whose country contributed to slavery suddenly forget the country they were born and raised in and take up the African culture of the slaves? Apparently so. I tend to disagree.

I am a proud BLACK American and realize that if not for the slaves I would not be here. However, the culture that they were stripped of is not mine, nor my moms or father’s, or my grandparents or my great-grandparents.

Watching a National Geographic special of Africa or writing an essay is not taking “your” culture back. This is learning World History. We Black Americans are in no way African, and I don’t understand why there is such an urgency (after the Big Chop, of course) to suddenly Identify with your African ancestors. If you want to learn, don’t go the punk azz route by “reading and studying” - go to Africa. You (generally speaking) can learn the culture first hand. Do you (generally speaking) even know the tribe who’s culture you’re trying to take back?

Learning about Africa is great. Many people wouldn’t admit that Africa and it’s history is World History – all life started there. But we’ll see how many posers on this board would live their lives in Africa if told they could. Not saying that Africa is a bad place to live, but you, as a Black American would have a hard time adjusting to any culture that is not the spoiled culture that you are used to today.

In a lot of cases, Black Americans want to identify with Africa because they feel that they themselves don’t have an identity. Why do these people give others that much power? Are you without an identity because you feel that your culture (American) lacks the “exotic” traits many others seem to have? When I go to DR, I love and appreciate their ways – it is beautiful and so much more peaceful than my own. But since I was born in America, I understand that this is my culture, no matter who in my family wasn’t born American. America does have a culture that consists of all the people who make up America. It is this culture that we were born with, and that same culture can not be taken away from us.

Pero, asi es la vida. Recuerdas: No te dejas enganar por lo que aparece hermoso. Somos todos hijos de dios y dios no se vea razas.

760616


I really wasn&#39;t going to post anything in the thread, although I&#39;ll give respect to the OP for her intentions. I think finding ways of reaffirming the richness of your ancestral heritage is comendable and I&#39;m glad to see there are some of you that are embracing this. Your post Morena I find is seriously off key though, and I have to remind you that the THEY you keep pointing out were YOUR ancestors. Their blood STILL runs through your veins, and the fact that you are posting on Nappturality shows that this ancestry is an obvious part of you genetic make up and one that is specific to the African race. You may want to negate your heritage but everytime you see your reflection is it not starting you in the face?!?!? Do you not realise that the loss of ones culture equates to the loss of identity. And yes, of course there has been a lot of intermixing since the enslaved people were stolen from the Motherland. There has been intermixing in the continent also. My family although born in Africa, were also enslaved, the woman raped by the Portuguese and were then later freed and taken to a part of Africa that was not their country. They were then called Aku which means displaced or refugee. The european part of my heritage was not something that I ever wanted to embrace because I identified the Europeans as being the ones that enslaved the Africans, killing, torturing and raping them. Something to be proud of... nah, I don&#39;t think so, but now I realise that in order to know oneself, you have to go back to the root and embrace this fully.

chanelle26
03-17-2005, 03:03 PM
I am new to this site and have been napptural for about a year now but i did want to comment on the ensuing discussion of "Taking my Black Back!!", though it appears that we&#39;ve gotten a little off topic.

I find it extremely troubling that we, African American/black women, have become so superficial as to believe that making a decision to wear ones hair napptural means we&#39;ve gotten one step closer to being truly "black". I know plenty of sisters that have chemically straightened hair, yet know more about the African American culture, and yes we do have a culture, and help out the African American community more than some of my fellow napptural sisters. We are no more "black" than the sisters that still get their hair chemically altered every couple of months. Sometimes hair is just hair and how one chooses to wear it does not necessarily mean that they are &#39;afrocentric&#39;, &#39;too black&#39;, &#39;going through a stage&#39;, etc, it is simply a means of expression.

Taking pride in ones inward identity and wanting to help people to understand that the stereotypes perpetuated by the media are incorrect is what it means to "take ones black back".

If we, the African American community, truly want to take our black back we need to start by educating people, particularly the kids, about positive black role models (meaning they need to know more about their heritage than just MLK, Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, etc.). We need to stop encouraging misogyny with videos shown on BET, a channel that&#39;s suppose to be an aid to us has become more of a hindrance. We need to fight against the injustices as a group instead of fighting against one another.

Peace
*Hair is an expression of ones self image, not ones cultural identity.

Urbanite
03-17-2005, 03:04 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 17 2005, 08:29 AM
Like I said, this is an open discussion. The points I bring up do not have to be relevant to you.......

762096


Never said they were relevant to me. They could, at least, be connected to the convo. To say something and then claim it has no connection to ideas presented in the convo makes no sense. But, whatever. :rolleyes: I made my point.



It’ s obvious that many of us are not 100% African.
Also, the more I do to connect with my African heritage, the more I learn about myself. It feels natural. There are so many things that we do in all aspects of our life today that are directly connected with the continent and many of us don’t even know it. It still trips me out when I learn a 1000 year old African dance step that looks exactly like something I saw in a hip hop video. It cracks me up when I hear Christians diss African traditional religions and then they go to church and practice many of the rituals that come directly from ATR.
Anyway, If you don’t want to connect with your African heritage, that’s on you, but don’t knock those who do.
I think that you should try to embrace as many of your ethnicities that can.

<span style='color:blue'>I feel the same way. I took an anthropology class last year and we studied the Bushmen of the Kalahari. The women had a tradition of sitting on a log together and just cracking jokes...if it did not look like Black women in a beauty parlor! In my friend&#39;s Black dance class, she learned that step emerged in African and African-American culture at the same time.

I had a white friend who loves the mess out of Black people. She went to Africa and when she came back, she exclaimed, "Every Black American needs to go! Ya&#39;ll will learn so much about yourselves!" She saw so many similarities in speech, dance, and even the whole "CP Time" phenomenon. Seems like Africans are just much more relaxed about time and have no worries about being late. I always saw clocks as a nuisance. ^_^
</span>

Nappilocs
03-17-2005, 03:06 PM
:icon_eek13: Okay, I had been reading bits and pieces of this thread and I just went back and read the entire thread. I kinda wish I hadn&#39;t.




we have the slave masters laughing in their graves. we&#39;re finishing their job for them

That about sums it up for me. :icon_headshake:

Urbanite
03-17-2005, 03:19 PM
Originally posted by chanelle26@Mar 17 2005, 10:03 AM
I am new to this site and have been napptural for about a year now but i did want to comment on the ensuing discussion of "Taking my Black Back!!", though it appears that we&#39;ve gotten a little off topic.

I find it extremely troubling that we, African American/black women, have become so superficial as to believe that making a decision to wear ones hair napptural means we&#39;ve gotten one step closer to being truly "black". I know plenty of sisters that have chemically straightened hair, yet know more about the African American culture, and yes we do have a culture, and help out the African American community more than some of my fellow napptural sisters. We are no more "black" than the sisters that still get their hair chemically altered every couple of months. Sometimes hair is just hair and how one chooses to wear it does not necessarily mean that they are &#39;afrocentric&#39;, &#39;too black&#39;, &#39;going through a stage&#39;, etc, it is simply a means of expression.

Taking pride in ones inward identity and wanting to help people to understand that the stereotypes perpetuated by the media are incorrect is what it means to "take ones black back".

If we, the African American community, truly want to take our black back we need to start by educating people, particularly the kids, about positive black role models (meaning they need to know more about their heritage than just MLK, Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, etc.). We need to stop encouraging misogyny with videos shown on BET, a channel that&#39;s suppose to be an aid to us has become more of a hindrance. We need to fight against the injustices as a group instead of fighting against one another.

Peace
*Hair is an expression of ones self image, not ones cultural identity.

762207


<span style='color:blue'>First of all, welcome to Nappturality!

I agree with your post. Hair does not make anyone more Black and the Black community has alot to overcome. I guess I just didn&#39;t read the thread the same way you did. To me, I don&#39;t think anyone is saying that this is just about hair, nor is anyone saying that a napptural sister is more Black than a sister with a perm. Many people on this thread, and other threads (I know, you&#39;re new but you&#39;ll start seeing this) have expressed the need for education and unity in the Black community. In fact, the OP mentioned her hair AND her teaching others when she has the chance. If having nappy hair was all there was to it, most Black men would "Black" and our community would not have most of its problems.</span>


Taking pride in ones inward identity and wanting to help people to understand that the stereotypes perpetuated by the media are incorrect is what it means to "take ones black back".

<span style='color:blue'>I completely agree! However, for many people, like myself, embracing my naps is a part of the journey to learn more about my people and to throw off the expectations of others; to know that I do not have to fit into a Eurocentric standard of beauty. My naps are a part of my "taking pride in my inward identity." Does my nappy hair make me more Black? No. Does it better equip me to help the Black community? No. Does nappy hair mean the same thing for everybody? No. Is MY nappy hair a symbol for something to ME? YES. And that&#39;s all that matters.
</span>

morena23
03-17-2005, 04:01 PM
Originally posted by Lotuswoman@Mar 17 2005, 07:02 AM
I really wasn&#39;t going to post anything in the thread, although I&#39;ll give respect to the OP for her intentions. I think finding ways of reaffirming the richness of your ancestral heritage is comendable and I&#39;m glad to see there are some of you that are embracing this. Your post Morena I find is seriously off key though, and I have to remind you that the THEY you keep pointing out were YOUR ancestors. Their blood STILL runs through your veins, and the fact that you are posting on Nappturality shows that this ancestry is an obvious part of you genetic make up and one that is specific to the African race. You may want to negate your heritage but everytime you see your reflection is it not starting you in the face?!?!? Do you not realise that the loss of ones culture equates to the loss of identity. And yes, of course there has been a lot of intermixing since the enslaved people were stolen from the Motherland. There has been intermixing in the continent also. My family although born in Africa, were also enslaved, the woman raped by the Portuguese and were then later freed and taken to a part of Africa that was not their country. They were then called Aku which means displaced or refugee. The european part of my heritage was not something that I ever wanted to embrace because I identified the Europeans as being the ones that enslaved the Africans, killing, torturing and raping them. Something to be proud of... nah, I don&#39;t think so, but now I realise that in order to know oneself, you have to go back to the root and embrace this fully.

762205


I know what you mean about the European part. My mom and dad didn&#39;t talk much about his mother&#39;s side of the family because she was White, and my mom had always been raised not to trust White people. She abandoned that way of thinking when she had to "high yellow" kids, but it wasn&#39;t until we were maybe 4 or 5 that we really got to know more of my Grandmother&#39;s family. We of course knew her, but we were always to "busy" to participate in her family functions because of the reasons you posted. So I understand that part.

morena23
03-17-2005, 04:04 PM
I don&#39;t consider slaves from 500 years ago to be part of my family. I&#39;m grateful for the entire continent of Africa and it&#39;s people - life itself started there, but to try and front like the slaves passed on or even intended to pass on their culture to me is just that - a front.

I’m sorry most of you feel that your identity is lost due to a culture of people who are 500 years in their graves. I’m sorry if you feel that in that 500 years, Black America has not adapted its own culture, one that is full of pride and beauty. Our African Genes shine through more than people realize, and it does not take studying Africa to see it. The culture that we do have is a culture to love and embrace. It is really sad that people do not see the culture that stares them in the face every day, but think we are supposed to be able to see the African parts. If you have to go searching for a culture to have, then that is not your culture, never was intended to be.

It ain’t where you from, it’s where you at.

I&#39;m not a poser. If I had any real roots in Africa, instead of Black America, then most certainly, I think that it would be stupid not to chase that down. Everyone should know exactly where they came from.

How about you go ask a random group of Africans how they feel about your African Ancestry. The majority will look at you like you lost your mind. You don’t know nothing about Africa – like I said other than what you read, are taught, or see on TV. Some people here may have even visited. FEELING a connection to a people is not the same as HAVING a connection. You are Black American.

I, fortunately or unfortunately come from America. Everyone on this board can sit here and talk about how much of a connection they feel to Africa, but are any of you planning to go live in the place you so desperately want a connection to? Like I said before, you don’t even know the race of people you are looking for. You would have to use a service like Africanancestry.com. It’s not like you could go ask any of your relatives. If you have to go this route, then OBVIOUSLY this is not your people or your culture. Your people and your culture are the people and culture that you grew up with. Are you ashamed of your family?

All this “re-claiming my Black” is saying that at one point or another you weren’t Black. I feel sorry for you. I’ve always been Black. I think it is weird to try to be like people who have almost no connection to you. I mean a “real” connection, not a spiritual or a “their hair is kinky, my hair is kinky we must be related” connection.

Slavery existed in the islands also. Do we ever hear people refer to themselves as African-Jamaican or African Dominican? Why is it that Black Americans are the only ones who are ashamed of their identities? Face it, you are AMERICAN. You are no more African than the other countries who had African slaves and as a result have Black people.

If you want to connect with Africa, that’s great, but to say it is because it is your culture is a lie. Like it or not, your culture is American. Implementing the culture of Africans, if it was not already a part of your life, does not make you any less American. If you are so ashamed of that then you are ashamed of yourself.

I do not deny my African ancestors. What I do deny is the fact that my culture is that of the slaves. Taking back my Black (if it was ever taken) would have nothing to do with them, since MY Blackness has been the same since day 1. It is a shame that people feel so out of touch with themselves, don’t feel like they belong here, can’t relate to America, etc. WHERE IN THE HECK HAVE YOU BEEN YOUR WHOLE LIFE?

Saying that you are Black American does NOT negate our African ancestors. Quite contrary, it defines it. They are partly responsible for the success of this country. These Africans suffered and as a result, we are American.

Lotuswoman
03-17-2005, 04:11 PM
Originally posted by Shanna@Mar 16 2005, 05:03 PM
Those people are a part of me. They who had their culture stripped away are why I am here. There&#39;s nothing at all wrong with acknowledging that fact. America is essentially... a rootless place for the most of us, except for the natives who were killed and put on erservations. It does have it&#39;s own CULTURE, but you, your family has roots. And if you want to sever your roots to when slavery ended, great. I&#39;m not on some trip where I want to eat African food and wear African clothes and go "back" to Africa, I just acknowledge that Africa is very much a part of me. I look like this BECAUSE I am of there. No more, no less. And I do associate wearing my hair like this with reclaiming the beauty in all of our African-inherited features. Our Black American selves have our roots in Black Africa and for most of us, we have the VISIBLE roots. What&#39;s wrong with claiming them? :dunno: If you can go "Well my mom has Italian heritage" and "My great-great grandma was Indian so my hair is wavy", why can I not go "I have my roots in Africa and I am proud?"

760644


Nicely said..;).

Lotuswoman
03-17-2005, 04:26 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 17 2005, 04:01 PM
I know what you mean about the European part. My mom and dad didn&#39;t talk much about his mother&#39;s side of the family because she was White, and my mom had always been raised not to trust White people. She abandoned that way of thinking when she had to "high yellow" kids, but it wasn&#39;t until we were maybe 4 or 5 that we really got to know more of my Grandmother&#39;s family. We of course knew her, but we were always to "busy" to participate in her family functions because of the reasons you posted. So I understand that part.

762327


Okay, glad some of it made sense to you... ;)

Lotuswoman
03-17-2005, 04:32 PM
DP :dunno:

bajanempress
03-17-2005, 04:47 PM
Slavery existed in the islands also. Do we ever hear people refer to themselves as African-Jamaican or African Dominican? Why is it that Black Americans are the only ones who are ashamed of their identities? Face it, you are AMERICAN. You are no more African than the other countries who had African slaves and as a result have Black people.


Just because you&#39;ve never heard it doesn&#39;t mean it doesn&#39;t happen.

I am a Bajan of African descent, there are persons who identify themselves as white Bajans.

In Trinidad there are Chinese, Indian and Black/African Trinidadians. In both Guyana and Trinidad there is serious tension between persons of African descent and those of Indian descent, there is racism and elitism in all of the islands with the most African looking being at the bottom of the ladder. Please don&#39;t speak about what goes on in "the islands" a term most of us hate- because you have no clue.

All of us acknowledge that we are not originally from the West Indies and honor our ancestry accordingly.

Urbanite
03-17-2005, 04:49 PM
Our African Genes shine through more than people realize, and it does not take studying Africa to see it.

<span style='color:blue'>How can you say your African genes are shining through if you don&#39;t know what African genes are? Don&#39;t you have to study Africa in order to know what "African" is?

I think the slaves have passed on some of their culture. Like the holy dance you mentioned earlier...where did that come from? The slaves could not completely pass on their culture, but to deny they did is not taking a good look at African-American culture.

Personally, I think the saying "taking my Black back" does not mean the same for all people. It does not mean "I was never Black." For ME, it means casting off Eurocentric ideas that I have never felt comfortable with. It means not taking on the view that Africa and its cultures and traditions are somehow backwards or inferior to Western culture. It means loving and appreciating African-American culture and seeing the similarities in African cultures.

Perhaps it is a search of identity, but for ME, this is something that is natural for all people. A lesbian would have to come to terms with her identity. A Muslim in a Christian family would have to make a choice of whether or not to follow what he believes or pretend to be something he is not to please others. The same goes with "taking my Black back." When I was 15 years old, I was confronted, within myself, on the issue of perming my hair. Permed hair for all women does not mean a denial of self but for ME, it definitely did. For me to stop perming my hair was taking my BLACK back or taking MYSELF back. I have always noticed the destructive ideas and behaviors in the Black community and wanted to confront these problems. This is taking my BLACK back, because, just as the beauty of African-American culture is a result of our experience in America, so are our many problems.

Taking my BLACK back, for ME, is not about pretending to be something I&#39;m not. It&#39;s not about pretending that I am not American. However, I cannot deny that I have ALWAYS felt a connection to Africa. I understand that not all Black Americans have felt that connection; I can only speak for myself. I don&#39;t know why I have felt this way; I just know that I have and a part of taking my BLACK back is not suppressing that feeling. Nor is it lying and saying "I&#39;m not BLACK American." For ME, it&#39;s acknowledging a connection to both places, both Africa (the parts of African-American culture that resemble African culture) and America (the parts of African-American culture that are American).
Taking my BLACK back means accepting and loving BOTH, not one over the other.
</span>

morena23
03-17-2005, 04:57 PM
Originally posted by Urbanite@Mar 17 2005, 08:49 AM
<span style='color:blue'>How can you say your African genes are shining through if you don&#39;t know what African genes are? Don&#39;t you have to study Africa in order to know what "African" is?

</span>

762446


I get such a KICK outta you!!!!

Because, honey, it is OBVIOUS and common knowledge that African slaves are the reason Blacks are here today........ it would be impossible not to share some genes with these people

FYI - Genes do not equal culture. If your culture is not African you can be the spitting image of an African, and still not have, nor be entitled to the culture.

Now was that so hard???!!!!

Lotuswoman
03-17-2005, 04:59 PM
Originally posted by bajanempress@Mar 17 2005, 04:47 PM
Just because you&#39;ve never heard it doesn&#39;t mean it doesn&#39;t happen.

I am a Bajan of African descent, there are persons who identify themselves as white Bajans.

In Trinidad there are Chinese, Indian and Black/African Trinidadians. In both Guyana and Trinidad there is serious tension between persons of African descent and those of Indian descent, there is racism and elitism in all of the islands with the most African looking being at the bottom of the ladder. Please don&#39;t speak about what goes on in "the islands" a term most of us hate- because you have no clue.

All of us acknowledge that we are not originally from the West Indies and honor our ancestry accordingly.

762439


My husband is Guyanese and he told me of the tensions between the Indians and African descent folk. He said that it if an Indian calls you Black man it is with an intent of being disrespectful, but if they call you African there is no disrespect intended. Something to think about perhaps Morena.. :dunno: :unsure:

morena23
03-17-2005, 05:04 PM
Originally posted by Lotuswoman@Mar 17 2005, 08:59 AM
My husband is Guyanese and he told me of the tensions between the Indians and African descent folk. He said that it if an Indian calls you Black man it is with an intent of being disrespectful, but if they call you African there is no disrespect intended. Something to think about perhaps Morena.. :dunno: :unsure:

762464


I don&#39;t get the point, but let me have a stab at it (OJ Joke)
I would not get offended if someone called me African, but would kindly let them know that I am American. I see no offense in being called Black, but if others on this board do :dunno:

Why get all proud and front like I am someone who I am not?

Lotuswoman
03-17-2005, 05:29 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 17 2005, 05:04 PM
I don&#39;t get the point, but let me have a stab at it (OJ Joke)
I would not get offended if someone called me African, but would kindly let them know that I am American. I see no offense in being called Black, but if others on this board do :dunno:

Why get all proud and front like I am someone who I am not?

762473


To each his own. Speaking for myself as being someone born in the UK, I would never refer to myself as being Black British just like I wouldn&#39;t expect someone whose parents were born in China for example to call themselves Yellow British. To be honest with you I actually make no claim of Britain and call myself a straight up African, but that&#39;s just my preference. If people want a further explanation then I tell them, I&#39;m an African born in Britain. For me there is a pride in refering to myself as being African even though I wasn&#39;t born there. The West went to great lengths in demonising the African continent and its peoples, and I feel that when I describe myself as being African, I am making a statment that I reject all the lies about my people by aligning myself with my ancestors with Pride. At the end of the day you have your way and I have mine... this thread has just gone so off the point *lol*. I&#39;m going to get some work done now.. ;)

Chlyric Images
03-17-2005, 05:44 PM
This is so sad and gross.

Urbanite
03-17-2005, 06:43 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 17 2005, 11:57 AM
I get such a KICK outta you!!!!

Because, honey, it is OBVIOUS and common knowledge that African slaves are the reason Blacks are here today........ it would be impossible not to share some genes with these people

FYI - Genes do not equal culture. If your culture is not African you can be the spitting image of an African, and still not have, nor be entitled to the culture.

Now was that so hard???!!!!

762460


<span style='color:blue'>You missed my point. Or maybe I didn&#39;t have a point...this is an open-discussion. Not everything I said is directed to you, or to what anyone here has said, right?

:pointlaugh: :lol:

Just kidding. My point, sis, is that our genes and aspects of African culture are in African-American culture, and that it does take some studying of Africa to see that. Like the holy dance you mentioned...how do you know that comes from ATR unless you have some knowledge of ATR?

But did you read my explanation of "taking my BLACK back"? I think that&#39;s what most people on here meant. In fact, the OP said nothing about denying her African AMERICAN culture.</span>


To each his own. Speaking for myself as being someone born in the UK, I would never refer to myself as being Black British just like I wouldn&#39;t expect someone whose parents were born in China for example to call themselves Yellow British. To be honest with you I actually make no claim of Britain and call myself a straight up African, but that&#39;s just my preference. If people want a further explanation then I tell them, I&#39;m an African born in Britain. For me there is a pride in refering to myself as being African even though I wasn&#39;t born there. The West went to great lengths in demonising the African continent and its peoples, and I feel that when I describe myself as being African, I am making a statment that I reject all the lies about my people by aligning myself with my ancestors with Pride. At the end of the day you have your way and I have mine... this thread has just gone so off the point *lol*. I&#39;m going to get some work done now..

<span style='color:blue'>I agree with you, Lotuswoman, especially on the bolded part. This is what "taking my Black back" means for me.

This thread went on a very strange tangent. I don&#39;t think the OP thought the statement would make this much noise, especially since she never said "taking her black back" meant denying that she was born in America or pretending that she&#39;s African. :rolleyes:

Anyway, I got your point, ByHisGrace. Blessings on your journey.</span>

morena23
03-17-2005, 06:51 PM
Originally posted by Urbanite@Mar 17 2005, 10:43 AM
<span style='color:blue'>You missed my point. Or maybe I didn&#39;t have a point...this is an open-discussion. Not everything I said is directed to you, or to what anyone here has said, right?

:pointlaugh: :lol:

Just kidding. My point, sis, is that our genes and aspects of African culture are in African-American culture, and that it does take some studying of Africa to see that. Like the holy dance you mentioned...how do you know that comes from ATR unless you have some knowledge of ATR?

But did you read my explanation of "taking my BLACK back"? I think that&#39;s what most people on here meant. In fact, the OP said nothing about denying her African AMERICAN culture.</span>
<span style='color:blue'>I agree with you, Lotuswoman, especially on the bolded part. This is what "taking my Black back" means for me.

This thread went on a very strange tangent. I don&#39;t think the OP thought the statement would make this much noise, especially sense she never said "taking her black back" meant denying that she is was born in America. :rolleyes: </span>

762603


Okay, a quick rundown...

The OP asked how we are taking back our Black. I said it was never taken. I was asked why. I explained. People disagreed. That is where the topic went off topic. I don&#39;t see why I was the only one challenged - oh I forgot - on NP you are supposed to think like everyone else.

Topics go off on other tangents all the time, but no one ever says anything until someone disagrees.

I actually understand where people are coming from, I really do. But understanding does not equal agreement. I guess I&#39;m a little more secure in myself and satisfied with how I identify myself. That&#39;s not saying that anyone else on this board is not (before you bring that up to ;) ), but just saying, in reference to the original Topic that Black Jada is the same Black Jada as she was when she emerged from the womb.

swingbolder
03-17-2005, 06:54 PM
i think that this discussion is so so so sad. no other ethnic minority in the world feels such an indifference to their heritage.

I agree. Walking home from church last week I passed the St. Patrick&#39;s Day Parade. Them white folks were out in full force wearing their green hats, wearing kilts and whatnot. I&#39;m sure many of them have never been to Ireland, but they still identify with the Motherland. Which is what we do when we celebrate aspects of African culture. It&#39;s a beautiful thing.

Sure I have no idea if my ancestors were Ashante or Yoruba etc., that doesn&#39;t really matter to me (although I&#39;d love to learn more specifics). There are still a lot of commonalities among all West African cultures (just like there are many commonalities among European countries), enuf so that learning about them, celebrating them enriches our own sense of identity.

I also have ancestors from Ireland, Native American (Seminole) and I like learning about those cultures too. I love me some Celtic, bagpipe music.

When I visited Ghana several years back I saw so many people who reminded me of folks back home. . . it was so interesting! Yes we have many differences and we are very Americanized, but that doesn&#39;t negate the ties which still exist and thank God were not broken throughout our history.

Even little things, like eating peas and rice on New Year&#39;s Day -- that comes straight from Africa. Using African herbal knowledge to heal my illnesses. And yes, wearing my nappy hair proudly, that makes me feel close to the Motherland too. And sweet soul music. . . the blues. . . that&#39;s straight from Africa too. I&#39;m talking specifically about how early African Americans took the major scale in music (which was European) and Africanized it by introducing "blue" notes -- the flatted fifth, flatted third. Without which there would be no jazz, no blues, no rock, no dance music, no pop music as we know it. This is music that touches the world. It&#39;s a beautiful thing.

Urbanite
03-17-2005, 07:15 PM
Originally posted by morena23@Mar 17 2005, 01:51 PM
Okay, a quick rundown...

The OP asked how we are taking back our Black. I said it was never taken. I was asked why. I explained. People disagreed. That is where the topic went off topic. I don&#39;t see why I was the only one challenged - oh I forgot - on NP you are supposed to think like everyone else.

Topics go off on other tangents all the time, but no one ever says anything until someone disagrees.

I actually understand where people are coming from, I really do. But understanding does not equal agreement. I guess I&#39;m a little more secure in myself and satisfied with how I identify myself. That&#39;s not saying that anyone else on this board is not (before you bring that up to ;) ), but just saying, in reference to the original Topic that Black Jada is the same Black Jada as she was when she emerged from the womb.

762618




Sorry, I couldn&#39;t resist. :rolleyes:

Disagreeing is not the problem. I can understand your point but trying to justify yourself by putting things into people mouths by saying that they are trying to be something they are not and are trying to deny being American is the problem. I challenged you because you were seriously projecting.

Here are some examples of things you said:


Why are people so ashamed to admit that they are American and personally know nothing about Africa?

Who mentioned shame? Oh...I forgot. You were making a point of some kind but you weren&#39;t referring to anything anyone said in the thread.


I am made up of Indian, African, Carribean, Irish, From my mom and dad&#39;s side. All of that mixed together has made me. I am Black, but not just because of the African Slaves. There is no such thing as Black Americans who are 100% African, so why dwell on THAT part of our being and not the other.

Did anyone ask you to deny any other part of your being or suggest that every Black American should do this? Or was this another comment with no connection to the thread?



Should every Black person whose country contributed to slavery suddenly forget the country they were born and raised in and take up the African culture of the slaves? Apparently so.

<span style='color:blue'>Apparently? Really? What gave you that idea?

This is what I&#39;m talking about. You&#39;re assuming that people are ashamed of being American, that people are saying that we should deny other parts of our heritage, and that people are saying we ought to forget about the countries we were born and raised in. When I brought this up, you made up some weird excuse and then never addressed the many posts explaining that&#39;s not what anyone meant.

That&#39;s what makes good threads bad. I&#39;ve also come to see that people like me that give posts like yours too much attention also make threads go bad.

So I bow out. I apologize for my part in making this thread "sad and gross." Hopefully we can have a good discussion about this at another time. Grace and peace to everyone.</span>

Sunchild
03-17-2005, 07:16 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 17 2005, 01:44 PM
This is so sad and gross.

762513

Very much so Sis.

:huh:@ these responses

meagan22
03-17-2005, 07:27 PM
Originally posted by lovinblackness@Mar 17 2005, 12:06 AM
Uh hell naw. That is NOT what I meant. :lol: :icon_headshake:

761819

:huh:
well then what did you mean?

Melanizm
03-17-2005, 07:33 PM
Originally posted by Chlyric Images@Mar 17 2005, 05:44 PM
This is so sad and gross.

762513


you aint neva lied.

bajanempress
03-17-2005, 07:47 PM
I&#39;m done I think I&#39;ll just retire from this thread.

Do you sis.

To the OP...Bless.

bajanempress

morena23
03-17-2005, 08:48 PM
Originally posted by Urbanite@Mar 17 2005, 11:15 AM


That&#39;s what makes good threads bad. I&#39;ve also come to see that people like me that give posts like yours too much attention also make threads go bad.



762682


Exactly. Don&#39;t pay attention to me. Because all you are doing me is showing me what I posted. I think I know that.

But yeah, it&#39;s time to agree to disagree. And you&#39;re right. I always make good threads so bad with what, my difference in opinion and all. So it&#39;s sad that adults cannot disagree without these: :icon_headshake:

Like one person&#39;s opinion is better than another&#39;s.

pwr_puff
03-17-2005, 10:21 PM
-it&#39;s not the fact that you have a difference in opinion, what rubbed people wrong is the fact that assumptions were made that weren&#39;t true.
nobody denied being american (for those that were american) and the whole "America, Love it or LEAVE it" attitude p1ssed people off.
honestly, i think it was kinda rude.
- making smart @$$ed comments on a thread is not an adult discussion. if you felt that your "Black" was never taken you shouldve said such and left it at that. JMO.

Chlyric Images
03-17-2005, 11:04 PM
Originally posted by pwr_puff@Mar 17 2005, 02:21 PM
-it&#39;s not the fact that you have a difference in opinion, what rubbed people wrong is the fact that assumptions were made that weren&#39;t true.
nobody denied being american (for those that were american) and the whole "America, Love it or LEAVE it" attitude p1ssed people off.
honestly, i think it was kinda rude.
- making smart @$$ed comments on a thread is not an adult discussion. if you felt that your "Black" was never taken you shouldve said such and left it at that. JMO.

762976


Yuh I think the rudeness, jumping to conclusions and putting words in people&#39;s mouth wasn&#39;t the best way to continue an adult conversation. I know it messes me up everytime. I&#39;m quite the sarcastic heffa.