PDA

View Full Version : Black American English Dialects...



tjolims
01-29-2005, 07:55 PM
There are a lot of different Black American English dialects...I think that all of us here speak and or understand at least one.

What are the common underlying threads in so-called Black American English? Are there even any?

Are you proud of BAE, or is this something you want to erase from your vocabulary and accent? Or, is there a consistent middle ground that you have--kind of a "When in Rome..." philosophy to your speech patterns?

~*welekevu*~
01-30-2005, 02:00 AM
I hate the term black english. English is english. Dialects are present within every language, usually contingent upon location. I speak with an urban accent 'cause I grew up near a big city. Country folx talk different than city folx whether they're black, white, or anything else. Now, broken english is a different matter. I can't listen to anybody who can't string a decent sentence together. Also, whether brothers and sisters know it or not, many slang terms are derived from African languages. This is why I have no problem with our different dialects. The only thing that bothers me is if a person calls themselves speaking english and it sounds like another whole language. Just my :2cents: .

:afro: welekevu

ScoobyGurl
01-30-2005, 02:14 AM
I think the different dialects of English that black people speak (I don't want to call it a name because I honestly don't know what term to actually use for it :dunno: ) are such a testament to how smart and creative we are :) . I mean when you think about the fact that these dialects combine grammar rules and vocabulary from both English and various African languages, it amazes me. I'm proud of the dialect of English that is spoken in my home and urban neigborhood :wub: . I mean I don't use it when I'm talking to a white professor but I am proud of it and I don't hide it. I mean if I'm talking to a black friend and white people are present I still continue to speak the same way. Although for most of life I never have been able to have the "accent" that most people around me have. I have no idea why. I can speak the same grammar that my family uses at home and sometimes I can use the accent but it doesn't come naturally for me. I'm just weird :icon_eek13:

animeg
01-30-2005, 04:02 AM
Originally posted by tjolims@Jan 29 2005, 07:55 PM
There are a lot of different Black American English dialects...I think that all of us here speak and or understand at least one.

What are the common underlying threads in so-called Black American English? Are there even any?

Are you proud of BAE, or is this something you want to erase from your vocabulary and accent? Or, is there a consistent middle ground that you have--kind of a "When in Rome..." philosophy to your speech patterns?

694631

I like the dialect (southern BAE here) but don't speak it myself. I'm sometimes self conscious about it in front of whites, but that's me being weird. Just because some people have problems with other people's dialects doesn't mean they are wrong.

MizBrowniMD
01-30-2005, 04:29 PM
Originally posted by ScoobyGurl@Jan 29 2005, 09:14 PM
I think the different dialects of English that black people speak (I don't want to call it a name because I honestly don't know what term to actually use for it :dunno: ) are such a testament to how smart and creative we are :) . I mean when you think about the fact that these dialects combine grammar rules and vocabulary from both English and various African languages, it amazes me. I'm proud of the dialect of English that is spoken in my home and urban neigborhood :wub: . I mean I don't use it when I'm talking to a white professor but I am proud of it and I don't hide it. I mean if I'm talking to a black friend and white people are present I still continue to speak the same way. Although for most of life I never have been able to have the "accent" that most people around me have. I have no idea why. I can speak the same grammar that my family uses at home and sometimes I can use the accent but it doesn't come naturally for me. I'm just weird :icon_eek13:

695052

Can we say "code-switching"? And I am "mistress" of it. :wub:

Sunchild
01-30-2005, 04:57 PM
Originally posted by ScoobyGurl@Jan 29 2005, 10:14 PM
I think the different dialects of English that black people speak (I don't want to call it a name because I honestly don't know what term to actually use for it :dunno: ) are such a testament to how smart and creative we are :) . I mean when you think about the fact that these dialects combine grammar rules and vocabulary from both English and various African languages, it amazes me. I'm proud of the dialect and I don't hide it.

695052

:smil3f72836ee752e:

bajanempress
01-30-2005, 07:05 PM
What I think is really interesting is the similarities between the different English dialects spoken by AA's and West Indians. The first time I heard an AA say "mines" I did a triple take, I thought it was only persons in Barbados who spoke this way.

I would really enjoy a study on the preservation of African language syntax and words and the integration of them into English dialects in the diaspora, I think we would all be amazed at how much we have managed to pass on through the generations.

~*welekevu*~
01-30-2005, 08:40 PM
Originally posted by bajanempress@Jan 30 2005, 02:05 PM
I think we would all be amazed at how much we have managed to pass on through the generations.

695787


ITA. Some folx seem to think we just can't talk, but this is our way of retaining what we can of our original nation, language, and culture. This country has stripped us of nearly all of our orginal culture. Dialect and my beautiful napptural tresses are two of the few things that physically remind me of my Nation and I, for one, will never let my them go.

:afro: welekevu

eri
01-31-2005, 03:54 PM
Originally posted by bajanempress@Jan 30 2005, 01:05 PM
I would really enjoy a study on the preservation of African language syntax and words and the integration of them into English dialects in the diaspora, I think we would all be amazed at how much we have managed to pass on through the generations.

695787

*nods* me too. ita w/ welekevu about hair and dialect being reminders of who we are and where we came from. :wub:
this link gives a good overview of aave/bae. it has tons of info. john rickford (http:///www.stanford.edu/%7Erickford/ebonics/) suite for ebony and phonics gives a great grammar explanation and also touches on two views of the origins of aave. ebonics notes and discussion talks about grammar as well.

sunschild57
01-31-2005, 04:05 PM
Interesting discussion!

sunschild57
01-20-2007, 02:29 PM
bump

Sweetwhispers
01-21-2007, 04:44 AM
On NP i was told a) it does not exist
B) its just like cockney rhyming slang( which is not a dialect)
c) its bad

Clarissa359
01-21-2007, 06:37 AM
I'm bi-dialetal. I code switch all of the time, sometimes within the same conversation. Talking to another dialect speaker about non-work stuff, I tend to use more dialect. But when the conversation shifts to work, I shift to standard English.

I actually use more Black dialect in adulthood than I did growing up. The more I learned about it, the more I respected and loved it.

lsubabiedee
01-21-2007, 07:49 AM
I am a proud speaker of BAE or AAVE, whatever you want to call it. I dont really speak much SAE nor do most people under the age of about 60 or so here. Plus, there are so many creole and cajun french influences on English...that are slowly but surely rubbing off on me. :Angry:

I mean, I'd say I code switch, and I'm sure I do, but most of the time I have forgotten what is "standard" and what isn't. lol

bajanempress
01-21-2007, 08:08 AM
On NP i was told a) it does not exist
B) its just like cockney rhyming slang( which is not a dialect)
c) its bad
[/b]


There's a distinct difference between standard english, english dialect and slang. I get highly offended when someone refers to my dialect as slang. It has its own syntax and its own rules, slang tends to be generational.
AAVE has a similar syntax and rules to my dialect which is recognised as a dialect so I'm not sure why anyone would say this. I can't give examples with AAVE because I don't speak it although to make things easier for Americans I speak American english as opposed to my regular standard english or even my dialect.

Examples from my dialect would be.

"I ain like she"
"Dah is mines"
"Yesterday we fry fish"

The rules here are the pronouns her and him are not used and there is no past tense, the tense is given by stating when the event happened.

However if I said "She is bare bashment"- which basically means she is loose is slang because the term bashment is a slang term that is generational.

Facetious5488
01-21-2007, 08:31 AM
To be honest, there has to be a limit. Sometimes too much is too much, and it just starts sounding ignorant. There comes a point when a person has to go on a job interview, etc., and I&#39;m afraid this can hinder it. </span>

JustAnotherNappyGirl
01-21-2007, 12:04 PM
ITA. Some folx seem to think we just can&#39;t talk, but this is our way of retaining what we can of our original nation, language, and culture. This country has stripped us of nearly all of our orginal culture. Dialect and my beautiful napptural tresses are two of the few things that physically remind me of my Nation and I, for one, will never let my them go.

:afro: welekevu[/b]

I agree whole-heartedly...it&#39;s not either or - either you speak a black dialect or you speak standard English. The best of both worlds is retaining our own individuality and culture while still knowing how to handle ourselves in the larger society. It almost seems that as we abandon cultural expressions like our dialects, we&#39;re also losing so much about our culture that was good...the values and wisom that kept us going. I wonder if there is a connection?


I actually use more Black dialect in adulthood than I did growing up. The more I learned about it, the more I respected and loved it.[/b]

Me too. :wub:

Sweetwhispers
01-21-2007, 12:18 PM
To be honest, there has to be a limit. Sometimes too much is too much, and it just starts sounding ignorant. There comes a point when a person has to go on a job interview, etc., and I&#39;m afraid this can hinder it. </span>
[/b]

Would someone really go to a job interview speaking in a regional/black dialect? Come on now. If i were going for a job in the US i would know not to speak Creole.

Bajan Empress- when i have asked the question previously you&#39;d have thought i&#39;d asked Do Black Americans walk on all fours? The way people jumped on me. I&#39;ve seen it numerous times on numerous boards. American/ New World Blacks are very sensitive about speech/spelling etc.

bajanempress
01-21-2007, 12:38 PM
Bajan Empress- when i have asked the question previously you&#39;d have thought i&#39;d asked Do Black Americans walk on all fours? The way people jumped on me. I&#39;ve seen it numerous times on numerous boards. American/ New World Blacks are very sensitive about speech/spelling etc.
[/b]


This is why AAVE needs to be widely acknowledged as its own dialect so that some of the sensitivity can be done away with. Its not being ignorant as one poster insinuated, its simply that the dialect has different language rules to standard english.



Would someone really go to a job interview speaking in a regional/black dialect? Come on now. If i were going for a job in the US i would know not to speak Creole.[/b]

Yes someone would, if they didn&#39;t understand that they didn&#39;t speak English but an English dialect. There are many people in my country who believe they speak English when they only speak dialect. Some people simply can&#39;t switch because they were never taught standard English, I have seen this in people who speak dialects in Jamaica, Barbados and the US even in Costa Rica in Limon there is a predominantly black community that says they speak English, when I heard them speak I understood them but they were speaking a very thick English dialect not English. We have to define our dialects as such and embrace them and additionally ensure that our dialect speakers also learn standard english in order to be fully functional around non dialect speakers.

sunschild57
01-21-2007, 01:54 PM
This is why AAVE needs to be widely acknowledged as its own dialect so that some of the sensitivity can be done away with. Its not being ignorant as one poster insinuated, its simply that the dialect has different language rules to standard english.

We have to define our dialects as such and embrace them and additionally ensure that our dialect speakers also learn standard english in order to be fully functional around non dialect speakers.
[/b]
This is what the City of Oakland school board was trying to do a few years ago. There was such an uproar that they backed down. You would think that so called educated people (the many that were against the acknowledgement) would know the difference between slang an a dialect.
CENTER FOR APPLIED LINGUISTICS (http://www.cal.org/topics/dialects/aae.html)

bajanempress
01-21-2007, 02:51 PM
That was about 10 years or so back right sunschild? The impression I got then is that people thought the project was about teaching people in Ebonics and thus they would never learn to function outside of that setting because there would be a language barrier.

There clearly needs to be education across the board for blacks and other Americans to understand really what the goal is.

It really is a struggle, I know that at home someone who cannot code switch or who speaks as we call it only "brawling" Bajan is looked down upon.

My parents never allowed me to speak dialect in the house which is actual a good tool because I picked it up quickly at school but having to speak standard english at home taught me instinctively to code switch and really helped me in my grammar classes. I would probably have the same approach for my kids because they never taught me that it was something to be ashamed of however I&#39;m glad they did it because as a child it was easier to learn the dialect as a second language of sorts than it would have been to learn standard english. That said I often got teased mercilessly in primary school for "talking great" or equivalent of "talking white"

sunschild57
01-21-2007, 03:11 PM
My parents never allowed me to speak dialect in the house which is actual a good tool because I picked it up quickly at school but having to speak standard english at home taught me instinctively to code switch and really helped me in my grammar classes. I would probably have the same approach for my kids because they never taught me that it was something to be ashamed of however I&#39;m glad they did it because as a child it was easier to learn the dialect as a second language of sorts than it would have been to learn standard english.
[/b]
The problem the teachers in the Oakland school district were having and the problem teachers in the NYC school system are having (according to family members) is proper english is not spoken in some if not many of the homes. BAE is all these kids hear and speak in their homes and neighborhoods. To understand standard english, these kids must first learn the dynamics of the language they already speak. As if teaching isn&#39;t hard enough.

nappysurgeon
01-21-2007, 09:27 PM
I think it&#39;s fun. I use it from time to time when speaking to my friends. My parents (although from the Amsterdam projects in midtown NYC) didn&#39;t speak like that so it doesn&#39;t come naturally.

But I must say when I meet people and they use improper grammar, sometimes I don&#39;t know what they are talking about and I feel embarrased. I&#39;m a resident physician, I was interviewing a mother who brought her son into the clinic. She said xyz hurt when the nurse squozed it. I never heard of the word squoze before. Initially I was thinking I&#39;m intelligent, how come I&#39;ve never heard of this word. I had to admit to her that I didn&#39;t know what squoze meant, then she did a hand squeezing motion. Squoze is the past tense of squeeze. There have also been a couple of other incidents of improper pronunciation that took me a minute to understand. Many patients come into the hospital because of vomiking (not vomiting).

bajanempress
01-22-2007, 07:12 AM
I think it&#39;s fun. I use it from time to time when speaking to my friends. My parents (although from the Amsterdam projects in midtown NYC) didn&#39;t speak like that so it doesn&#39;t come naturally.

But I must say when I meet people and they use improper grammar, sometimes I don&#39;t know what they are talking about and I feel embarrased. I&#39;m a resident physician, I was interviewing a mother who brought her son into the clinic. She said xyz hurt when the nurse squozed it. I never heard of the word squoze before. Initially I was thinking I&#39;m intelligent, how come I&#39;ve never heard of this word. I had to admit to her that I didn&#39;t know what squoze meant, then she did a hand squeezing motion. Squoze is the past tense of squeeze. There have also been a couple of other incidents of improper pronunciation that took me a minute to understand. Many patients come into the hospital because of vomiking (not vomiting).
[/b]


LOL my cousin is a doctor at home (Barbados) and he was brought up in a similar fashion as me so although we can both speak Bajan dialect fluently there are some sayings and expressions that we have no clue about.

He told me that he used to be so confused when a patient came in and complained of "bad feels" or "dark eyes" I can&#39;t imagine how the foreign nurses in Barbados manage.

pacunurse30
01-22-2007, 01:59 PM
There are a lot of different Black American English dialects...I think that all of us here speak and or understand at least one.

What are the common underlying threads in so-called Black American English? Are there even any?

Are you proud of BAE, or is this something you want to erase from your vocabulary and accent? Or, is there a consistent middle ground that you have--kind of a "When in Rome..." philosophy to your speech patterns?
[/b]
I use the "when in Rome" philosophy. It&#39;s rare that I use ebonics or whatever around White people. I just can&#39;t do it. And I HATE when they do it, making the assumption that I use it all the time. As a matter of fact, I don&#39;t really use a lot of slang. I don&#39;t understand half of it, and I&#39;m too old for that mess anyway. I just use bad grammar. You know, a lot of "I be doin&#39; that too," "he be gettin on my nerves," "I done told his a$$ a thousand times," that kind of stuff. I personally don&#39;t have a problem with it. It&#39;s part of AA culture. I just think that when you&#39;re a professional, you should address people in a professional manner. Using correct grammar, etc. is necessary in that case.

bestnatural1
01-22-2007, 11:45 PM
There are a lot of different Black American English dialects...I think that all of us here speak and or understand at least one.

What are the common underlying threads in so-called Black American English? Are there even any?

Yes there is a common thread to what is really called African American English or AAE. The common thread is its beginnings here in the US with whites and Africans. It first started out as a pidgin and then emerged into a creole and then evolved into the dialect that we have now. It is important to note that AAE is not a disorder but just a dialectal difference when comparing other types of American dialects. By types of dialect I mean: Appliation (sp), Southern, Standard American English found here in the US.
In the past, schools had young Black children sent to receive special services (for their speech/ language) because they spoke AAE. When about 2/3rds of the children in the special education classes were Black.... there were then researchers who went to investigate if truly these children had a language/ speech disorder. It turns out that they did not ...they simply had a dialectal difference.

For example some of those dialectal differences are saying bath with an /f/ instead of with the /th/ on the end of a words ending with /th/. Or maybe even saying /d/ for words that have the /th/ in the beginning of it. Those are some examples of what is in the African American dialect.

Are you proud of BAE, or is this something you want to erase from your vocabulary and accent? Or, is there a consistent middle ground that you have--kind of a "When in Rome..." philosophy to your speech patterns?
In terms of code switch as you are referring to here... I do that a lot. Depending on who I am with. If I am just meeting someone for the first time, I will speak Standard American English. If I have known you for a while then I will code switch back and forth with AAE.

Hope this helps somewhat in this discussion. :)

ashta
01-23-2007, 11:40 AM
when i was a little girl growing up in the hood, my mother would never let me use slang or anything that could be associated with a "black" dialect, etc.

i would be in the middle of a sentence and if i said, &#39;ain&#39;t gon be&#39; or &#39;fixin to,&#39; she&#39;d make me back up and repeat the sentence correctly. at the time i was mad at her. i wanted to be like the other kids. but looking back, i&#39;m glad she did because i think it&#39;s something that some black people have problems adjusting to even those who are educated. it can be hard (for me at least) to distinguish between how you&#39;re supposed to speak in the right setting when you&#39;re young - or maybe it is hard to actually make the transition without feeling embarrassed or challenged because of your diction.

but i do agree with those who said they speak it more now as adults - i do.

what&#39;s interesting is that when zora neale hurston came out with &#39;their eyes were watching god,&#39; people (educated, wealthier blacks) were embarrassed and believe that black southern speech patterns had no place in literature.

but i&#39;m not sure how i feel about it being taught to children in school. i could see somebody learning about it in a linguistic course in college. i kinda think our children need to learn to speak(and write) sublime standard english. there&#39;s nothing wrong with that.

--------------------
Here&#39;s a story i read when it came out about folks in the gullah islands

Translating the gospel into Gullah
Linguists reach slave language speakers


By STEPHANIE SIMON
Los Angeles Times


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 31. 2005


The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.

No matter how often he read Psalm 23, Emory Campbell never could understand that line.

Then he joined a project to translate the Bible into the language of his ancestors - the language of slaves who toiled for centuries in rice paddies off the Carolina coast.

That first line became: "De Lawd me shephud. A hab ebryting wa A need."

It reminded Campbell, 64, of his grandmother&#39;s way of talking, earthy and frank and deep-down resonant. "Yes, indeed," Campbell said. "&#39;I have everything I need.&#39;That made sense to me."


Campbell had always considered himself above the slave language, known as Gullah. As a boy, he giggled at his grandma&#39;s speech. In college, he considered her "dem" and "dat" and "dey" a brand of ignorance. Psalm 23 opened his eyes to Gullah&#39;s riches. He would spend the next two decades struggling to make the Gospel sound like his grandmother.
The result -De Nyew Testament- was unveiled in St. Helena Island, South Carolina, last month at an annual festival to celebrate Gullah culture. Twenty-six years in the making, the Gullah gospel was written by descendants of slaves under the direction of traveling missionaries.

As a tool for evangelizing, it&#39;s not that efficient. No more than 10,000 people speak Gullah as their primary language; most are elderly and isolated on the Sea Islands, a chain off the coasts of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Perhaps another 250,000 coastal residents lapse into Gullah now and then among friends.

The small market doesn&#39;t trouble the missionaries who devote their lives to such projects. They consider it their calling to bring the Scripture to every tongue around the globe: to the 4,000 Africans who speak Igo, to the 3,000 South Americans who speak Chachi, to the 1,200 Pacific Islanders who speak Angaatiya.

"It&#39;s my vocation. It&#39;s my passion," said David Frank, a linguist who helped finish the Gullah project.

Before coming here, Frank and his wife, Lynn, spent 17 years translating the Bible into a Creole spoken only on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia. Like other Bible translators who travel the globe, the Franks do not draw a salary; instead, they solicit support from churches and individuals.

They&#39;ve built a core group of 15 donors who pledge $10 to $500 a month. Two Bible translation firms collect funds on the Franks&#39;behalf: the Summer Institute of Linguistics in Dallas and Wycliffe Bible Translators in Orlando, Fla. Both organizations are nonprofit and donor-driven.

Over the last 70 years, Wycliffe and the Summer Institute have translated the Bible into 611 languages.

The 900-page De Nyew Testament, available online for $10, was published by the American Bible Society, a donor-supported, nonprofit publisher based in New York. It includes an English translation of each verse next to the Gullah text.

The Bible went on sale first at the Gullah Heritage Festival, an annual three-day whirl of dance, prayer and food that attracts thousands to the Penn Center. At a linguistics symposium, a woman took the microphone to read the opening verses of the Book of John.

The words exploded from her mouth with such passion that locals and tourists found themselves calling out "Amen." Afterward, they lined up a dozen deep to buy De Nyew Testament. So far, about 3,000 have been sold.

Veteran Bible translators Pat and Claude Sharpe arrived in the Sea Islands in 1979. After years abroad, their health had forced them home, but they weren&#39;t ready to retire.

The Sharpes were fascinated with Gullah culture, which is rooted in the fishing and farming communities of 17th-century West Africa.

By the time the Sharpes arrived, Gullah speakers had learned to be ashamed of their native tongue.

So locals tried to persuade the Sharpes to drop the translation. "We told them we would not do it," said Ardell Greene, 54, a retired executive secretary.

The couple refused to give up.

In 1980, a year after the Sharpes arrived, Campbell took over as director of the nonprofit Penn Center, a community organization for the Gullah people on St. Helena Island.

He planned to focus on economic development: improving housing, expanding health care and fighting developers who were buying up Gullah farmland to build luxury resorts such as those in nearby Hilton Head Island, S.C.

Almost as soon as he took the job, however, Campbell found himself as a host not only to the Sharpes but other linguists, historians and tourists from the world over. All had come hoping to learn more about Gullah culture.

Through their eyes, Campbell began to see the importance of preserving Gullah craft, superstitions, song and even the language he had once been ashamed to call his own. Within a few years, he had signed on to help with the Bible translation, along with about a dozen other volunteers.

In 1994, the team released "De Good Nyews Bout Jedus Christ Wa Luke Write," or the Gospel according to Luke, to pique interest in the broader translation effort. It sold 30,000 copies. But not all Gullah descendants welcomed the project.

"It&#39;s nothing but broken English," said Lula Mitchell Holmes, 82, a retired teacher.

Frank, the linguist, arrived in the Sea Islands in the fall of 2002, shortly after Pat Sharpe died. The New Testament translation was nearly complete, but it took the team another three years to make sure every verse was true to "deep," or traditional, Gullah - and not the more modern, more English-sounding slang that has evolved in recent generations.

The 900-page volume, available online for $10, was published by the American Bible Society, a donor-supported, nonprofit publisher based in New York. It includes an English translation of each verse next to the Gullah text.

The Bible went on sale first at the Gullah Heritage Festival, an annual three-day whirl of dance, prayer and food that attracts thousands to the Penn Center. At a linguistics symposium, Canteen took the microphone to read the opening verses of the Book of John.

The words exploded from her mouth with such passion that locals and tourists found themselves calling out "Amen." Afterward, they lined up a dozen deep to buy De Nyew Testament. So far, about 3,000 have been sold.



By STEPHANIE SIMON

lsubabiedee
01-23-2007, 12:22 PM
I use the "when in Rome" philosophy. It&#39;s rare that I use ebonics or whatever around White people. I just can&#39;t do it. And I HATE when they do it, making the assumption that I use it all the time. As a matter of fact, I don&#39;t really use a lot of slang. I don&#39;t understand half of it, and I&#39;m too old for that mess anyway. I just use bad grammar. You know, a lot of "I be doin&#39; that too," "he be gettin on my nerves," "I done told his a$$ a thousand times," that kind of stuff. I personally don&#39;t have a problem with it. It&#39;s part of AA culture. I just think that when you&#39;re a professional, you should address people in a professional manner. Using correct grammar, etc. is necessary in that case.
[/b]


lol...what you just described as bad grammar is actually ebonics/bae/aave. and not bad grammar at all for the dialect.

sunschild57
01-23-2007, 03:30 PM
It&#39;s amazing how many people think they are speaking standard english when they are not. Some use past tense when they should be using present tense for example or past and present tense in the same sentence.

I have a friend who claims she never uses "black" english. She says she was not allowed to as a child and doesn&#39;t use it as an adult. I laugh to myself because she is the queen of word misuse(who for whom, which for that) and displaced prepositions. I know her mother well and know she didn&#39;t make it past 8th grade so, what does her mother know about "proper" standard english (do you like my run on sentense? Is there an independant clause in there?)? I don&#39;t know most of the rules and I made it well past the 8th grade.

Some people be perpetrating.