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itaylor
02-09-2005, 04:04 PM
I read a recent study released by the University of Chicago and recreated and validated by ABC news, that if you have an ethnic sounding name on your resume you are about 50% less likely to be called for a job interview. In fact a recruiter for a fortune 500 company admitted that her bosses specifically told her to weed out people with ethnic names. They suggested abbreviating your first name if it is ethnic sounding. I am outraged, because i have an "ethnic" name and i think that it is beautiful, i don't want to sell out my heritage, but i don't want to be cost jobs either. How do you combat racism in situations like this?

Lokii
02-11-2005, 07:23 PM
Is this first name or last name? If the prejudice is against first AND last names that sound "ethnic" then how do they explain the diversity of the 21st century workforce and fairly large representation of new immigrants in all fields these days. I don't see e.g. Indians or Latin Americans feeling compelled to change their names. Would they hire someone who is Greek or Armenian or Ukrainian or Nigerian? Or is "ethnic" in this case a euphemism for African American??

Anyone playing these games doesn't have any job openings to begin with. Don't worry about your name. Concentrate on building a valuable skill set so that you are in a position to sell your services to the highest bidder instead of playing mind games with bored department heads in companies that obviously aren't flourishing. If their business was booming they wouldn't have time for such nonsense.

cmsheart
02-11-2005, 07:41 PM
I agree with Lokii and you know what, I would rather plaster my name onto my resume with my skills and talents proving that I am capable of handling the job applied for rather than to get to the interview and have someone have me sitting in the lobby, then told that there was an "important meeting that just came up" because the receptionist gave them the code (and you know what I mean).

To piggy-back, you don't find people of other ethnicities worrying about this you know why... because they have confidence and believe in their talent more than the name chosen for them.

What's in a name anyhow? Just because your parents name you Mary - doesn't mean you are a saint, just because your parents named you John Paul doesn't mean you will become the next Pope and just beause your last name is Kennedy doesn't mean your rich (Uhh, but if your a Hilton you can bank on that :lol: ).

cmsheart

~*welekevu*~
02-13-2005, 05:01 AM
My name is my pride, and it will change for nothing and nobody. (Well, maybe my last name when I get married, GOD Willing ^_^ )

:afro: welekevu

beautfiul
02-13-2005, 05:31 AM
Thats that BullS. I have heard this before and personally think that it is geared more toward US in most cases, but of course if the HM doesnt like asians then it could change.

So if my name is Ke' Irianna Shantrell-Lashonda Jones and i got a masters degree and 3.8 gpa i cant get the job cause u want to hire Susan Marie Miller who got an Associates and a 2.0 ^_^ THough it may be true it sounds like a lot of bull to me cause if I would be doing the hiring i dont care if ur name got every letter in the alphabet , ten hyphens and a amphersand (sp?) the true factor is-- are u qualified........ This annoys the hell out of me.

I wish the next president would have a symbol not a name :lol: like prince used to then maybe they would let it go!!

librarising
02-13-2005, 05:56 AM
I wonder if

Ke' Irianna = Aaliyah or something like that in terms of "ethnic sounding" because to me, they are very different names with very different origins. Duracell does not equal Jamal in my book. Don't know about theirs though.

subbrock
02-13-2005, 03:06 PM
they were actually talking about this on a radio station where i live not too long ago and a WHITE man called up and said that he has a hard time getting jobs where he drops off an application vs. meeting the folks in person right off the bat because his name is "tyrone". he said that most of the people assume he's black and wont call him back. i thought that was a shame. and to make matters worse, the djs on the radio station were laughing at him asking him why he had a black name like "tyrone" to begin with. obviously it was a white radio station.

Sister1
02-13-2005, 04:22 PM
This is all to real but the deal is: what "ethnic" names are they referring to? Jamal, Kkadijah? Shonte? African-Americans in particular have ethnic names from birth: names that are European in origin from slaveholders that "gave" us our names. And notwithstanding having these European names first and last such as John,Mary, Smith, Jones, O'Brien, Ryan, etc, etc, we still encounter the brick wall or racism and bigotry time and time again. "Ethnic" is a code word for AAs.


@ Loki you said it right.

MsCurly85
02-13-2005, 06:33 PM
Yea.. I think when you say Ethnic ... you mean blacks.. b/c white people with Ethnic names don't have the same amount of problems with this. I hate that.. everyone belongs to an ethnic group regardless of their race.

Again.. I think its a way not just by name.. but identifying race. I feel like it doesn't matter your name.. its about what race you are.. they can give you a call back-not knowing your race.. but when you step into that building and they see you.. they aren't going to call you back after that. I rather not have someone waste my time on their hatred to be honest

elleebeme5
02-14-2005, 02:43 PM
From what ethnicity is Shaquandrea Martelliniqua?

torontogurrl
02-21-2005, 11:17 AM
Originally posted by Lokii@Feb 11 2005, 03:23 PM
I don't see e.g. Indians or Latin Americans feeling compelled to change their names. Would they hire someone who is Greek or Armenian or Ukrainian or Nigerian? Or is "ethnic" in this case a euphemism for African American??


Indian (South Asian) people change their (first) names all the time for business purposes...sad, but true. But I believe it happens sometimes so that they can solicit non-Indian clients to their business in addition to trying to integrate into non-Indian businesses.

Twistie74
02-21-2005, 03:09 PM
I've heard about this before and honestly, I think ethnic is only code-word for Black names. Not Julia Stephanopoulos, Greg Mastrantonio or Ivy Strakovsky but Lakeisha Jackson, Tyrone Jones and Shaquanica Williams.

ScoobyGurl
02-21-2005, 03:34 PM
Ethnic seems to be a euphemism for "African American." I really think that is such a crap. Somehow, someway the media always seems to find a way to tell us not to be proud of our culture. To them I say http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/mad/1/mad13.gif

Nappilocs
02-21-2005, 04:51 PM
Originally posted by ScoobyGurl@Feb 21 2005, 04:34 PM
Ethnic seems to be a euphemism for "African American." I really think that is such a crap. Somehow, someway the media always seems to find a way to tell us not to be proud of our culture. To them I say http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/mad/1/mad13.gif

727387


ITA. You don't see Indians, Russians, or Asians trying to change thier names. Like before when this topic has been discussed, we need to stop trying to make these corporate folks comfortable, and DEMAND that they respect us the same way they respect every other culture.
It pisses me off to think of everything that our ancestors went through for us to become equal citizens and we are STILL this intimidated by them.

mstnt
02-21-2005, 11:39 PM
It pisses me off to think of everything that our ancestors went through for us to become equal citizens and we are STILL this intimidated by them.

727522
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You hit the nail on the head girl, That's what I feel is truly wrong with us we're too scared of getting respect so we reject it. I think it's the fact that we've never been totally respected by this society so we really don't know how to fully gain our due respect.

Other favorite euphemisms of mines URBAN, LOWER INCOME and INNER CITY..Damn those people

naturalmama
02-21-2005, 11:45 PM
Ok, I would take these studies with a grain of salt. I know sooooo many people with ethnic even the Black "made up" names who are all working in the top echelons of corporate america. It just doesnt matter. People are going to be prejudiced against your name, about you being black, a woman. Who cares. Just do your best and don't let others attitudes stop you from achieving your goals.

charli
02-22-2005, 12:58 AM
You don't see Indians, Russians, or Asians trying to change thier names.

OH YES THEY DO. I worked with a Korean woman that went with a shortened translated version of her first name, "Liza." And it's very common for Chinese to take on an American name all the time. You don't honestly think all these Chinese immigrants are named Peter, Mary, Johnny and such? I remember once a man had bought something from me and he was checking on it. And he kept giving me this name (his native name) and I couldn't find it. Finally, he laughed and said, oh use Peter, that's my American name. It's extremely common among. I was in an office once where two women were like I think I know you and one was like, what's your dad's name and she says, Danny. And she said, no what's his Chinese name.

So it is common among other cultures, we just don't think it is. I used to work in HR, it's very common for a lot of people to change their names or take on an assumed name in corporate america. EVEN WHITE people. You will rarely meet a white woman (as an example) that wants to go by Kelly Sue or Betsie Mae or whatever throwback name she has. Yes, they even change their names to fit into their standard. Kinda funny when you think about it.

naturalmama
02-22-2005, 01:51 AM
But you know who almost never changes their names. Indians, they are very proud of their heritage and they will make you pronounce that name.

Twistie74
02-22-2005, 04:55 AM
By naturalmama:

"I know sooooo many people with ethnic even the Black "made up" names who are all working in the top echelons of corporate america."

Yeah, like Condoleezza Rice.

MsCurly85
02-22-2005, 05:05 AM
Originally posted by charli@Feb 21 2005, 08:58 PM
OH YES THEY DO. I worked with a Korean woman that went with a shortened translated version of her first name, "Liza." And it's very common for Chinese to take on an American name all the time. You don't honestly think all these Chinese immigrants are named Peter, Mary, Johnny and such? I remember once a man had bought something from me and he was checking on it. And he kept giving me this name (his native name) and I couldn't find it. Finally, he laughed and said, oh use Peter, that's my American name. It's extremely common among. I was in an office once where two women were like I think I know you and one was like, what's your dad's name and she says, Danny. And she said, no what's his Chinese name.

So it is common among other cultures, we just don't think it is. I used to work in HR, it's very common for a lot of people to change their names or take on an assumed name in corporate america. EVEN WHITE people. You will rarely meet a white woman (as an example) that wants to go by Kelly Sue or Betsie Mae or whatever throwback name she has. Yes, they even change their names to fit into their standard. Kinda funny when you think about it.

728102


I agree

elleebeme5
02-22-2005, 12:41 PM
But you know what with Condoleeza? I forgot what it means, but it has something to do with music that her mother loved. While it's a weird name, I think it's different when you give a name that has meaning and purpose opposed to when you give a name that has a bunch of capital letters and syllables.

My cousin named her child Sharay. While it sounds 'ethnic', her daughter knows and says with pride that she was named after her grandmothers, Sharon and Kay. I met a young woman named a Talitha. Her mother named her that because her pregnancy and the baby were in danger and the family prayed for healing. In the bible, there is a similar story where upon receiving the healing, the woman exclaimed Talitha.

Not that all of that matters to racist employers, but I think it can make a difference to children.

torontogurrl
02-23-2005, 01:22 PM
Originally posted by naturalmama@Feb 21 2005, 09:51 PM
But you know who almost never changes their names. Indians, they are very proud of their heritage and they will make you pronounce that name.

728173


Yes they do. I live in an area where there are a lot of South Asians and have friends (i.e. socialize with outside of school and work) that are South Asian as well. That is one of the things that we sometimes joke about, the name change. Sometimes you can get a Western sounding name out of the Indian name e.g. Brigpal could be changed to Paul. But then sometimes the name just seems to come out of nowhere e.g. Kameldeep to Shawn.