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sweetsoca
11-25-2003, 04:53 PM
I took down my son's baby locs last night. He's 11 yo and he was locing for about a month and has been growing out his hair since spring. :violin

After discussing it with my dh we decided it was better to remove the locs due to the numerous negative images in our local news. It seems that there is alot of violence in our local community being committed by young black men with dreadlocks so almost every night we turn on the news and there's a picture of some guy wanted or accused wearing dreads. :nohuh

We've decided to allow him to wear his hair braided so he can continue to let it grow. My DH has a twa and I still have my baby dreads so we'll still be a nappy family. Maybe when he's older, like out of high school he can go back to the locs. He looked so cute with them too. We'll miss them.

:pop :pop

babylocs
11-25-2003, 05:18 PM
Sorry to hear that you had to let them go for that reason, but at least he can still wear his braids and let his hair grow if he wants. Plus like you say, when he gets older, and still wants them, he can still loc.

Leecee
11-25-2003, 05:18 PM
Okay, part of me thinks that this is a joke, you can't be serious.
But I'll take the bait.

Black people have been potrayed in the news negatively (is that a word?) for years, so why would this be a determent?
Kids with baggy jeans and black hoodies fit the MO for a thug.
Do you change the way your kid dresses?
Black men in expensive cars look like drug dealers?
Do you only drive less expensive cars?
:-?

Isn't that why some of us went natural in the first place?
To embrace our hair in its natural state and not conform to what others think is acceptable?

And another note, from a distant don't cornrows and braids look like locs?

I mean, I am a mother, too and I understand your concern for your son's safety, but I think you're overreacting. I think you should be concentrating more on keeping him in a safe environment and knowing his whereabouts when your and your DH are not around.

Utimately, it's your child and your decision. Good Luck.

Beryl
11-25-2003, 05:49 PM
Originally posted by Leecee@Nov 25 2003, 12:18 PM
Okay, part of me thinks that this is a joke, you can't be serious.
I was thinking the same thing and Leecee expressed my concern.

I understand for safety, your child might want to avoid certain colors. However, I'm not comfortable with locs not being worn because they are common among thugs. I think it supports those who won't allow certain natural styles in schools and work settings.

It is your child and your choice. I wish you and yours the best.

sweetsoca
11-25-2003, 05:53 PM
Originally posted by Leecee@Nov 25 2003, 01:18 PM
Kids with baggy jeans and black hoodies fit the MO for a thug.
Do you change the way your kid dresses?
Black men in expensive cars look like drug dealers?
Do you only drive less expensive cars?
:-?

Isn't that why some of us went natural in the first place?
To embrace our hair in its natural state and not conform to what others think is acceptable?

And another note, from a distant don't cornrows and braids look like locs?

I mean, I am a mother, too and I understand your concern for your son's safety, but I think you're overreacting. I think you should be concentrating more on keeping him in a safe environment and knowing his whereabouts when your and your DH are not around.

Utimately, it's your child and your decision. Good Luck.
@ Lee - Well we don't subsrcibe to the baggy/below the butt look that many of our young men have adopted. We are totally against that look so it would never be an option for him. We do not let him hang out EVER so we always know his whereabouts and know all his friends so his safety is always a paramount concern. He's an only so we keep him close to the vest.

As to conforming, I agree that we do embrace our Nappiness but we don't want him to be singled out and subjected to unfair treatment because of it. He attends a school that is prolly 3-4% black and recently he's started having trouble with one of his teachers. We are due to meet with the principal regarding the teacher (she's mean to alot of the kids, not just my son) but in the mean time we're just concerned for him.

Braids are alot more groomed which is why we opted for them instead.

Nappalonia
11-25-2003, 07:22 PM
Originally posted by sweetsoca@Nov 25 2003, 11:53 AM
After discussing it with my dh we decided it was better to remove the locs due to the numerous negative images in our local news. It seems that there is alot of violence in our local community being committed by young black men with dreadlocks so almost every night we turn on the news and there's a picture of some guy wanted or accused wearing dreads. :nohuh


:-?
:tiptoe

kadburyz
11-25-2003, 10:39 PM
Society, society!

Today it is the locs. Tomorrow it will be his braids. The next day his cornrows. That afternoon the bike he was riding. The next year it will be his friends. The year after that whatever he is, he will fit the description, like all black men in America.

The common denominator and the one constant is being black.

Sadly, we cant change being black.

MuthaErth
11-25-2003, 11:50 PM
i'm the proud mother of 5 loced children. my children are on honor roll, and are good kids and the way they dress or the way they wear their hair is a form of expression and self-pride. i'm sorry to hear that you feel this way about locs for your son, me and mine we are in the business of destroying all sterotypes (like the ones mentioned at the start of this thread) and living our loced lives to the fullest :)

Tori
11-26-2003, 12:05 AM
Originally posted by sweetsoca@Nov 25 2003, 01:53 PM
but we don't want him to be singled out and subjected to unfair treatment because of it.

he's started having trouble with one of his teachers.

We are due to meet with the principal regarding the teacher

(she's mean to alot of the kids, not just my son)
With all due respect, I offer a challenge:

Regarding your comments
1. so should we consider going back to relaxing next? and will everyone now think he's someone else and start being nice?
2. then isn't that HER problem?
3. does that mean you will change his hair back?
4. do all THOSE kids have locs too?

temari
11-26-2003, 02:50 AM
Okay, part of me thinks that this is a joke, you can't be serious.



......we are in the business of destroying all sterotypes


I was thinking the same things. Where do you live where you would want to change your or child's hair because of other peoples opinions? Your son could help break the negativity by wearing his hair the way he wants and excelling in life. One person can make a difference. My daughter wears her hair natural (not loced, i am loced) and hasn't experienced any negative views. I am sorry that your community isn't as open minded as mine.

dewdrop
11-26-2003, 05:49 AM
Originally posted by sweetsoca@Nov 25 2003, 09:53 AM

It seems that there is alot of violence in our local community being committed by young black men with dreadlocks so almost every night we turn on the news and there's a picture of some guy wanted or accused wearing dreads.
Personally, I would have kept the locs only because I would want to teach the world that not EVERY dread head in that area is bad and commits crimes. There are good ones too, strong, powerful, and he would be a walking example.

dewdrop
11-26-2003, 05:56 AM
One more comment, then again it is how a person perceives another person based on the information that they are given. For example, if I lived in your area and heard that news, with the knowledge that I have, I wouldn't stereotype/ categorize every dread head as violent. I would think, it is just those individuals who have problems and unfortunately, they all have a common factor....wearing dreads (which isn't bad, but dreads doesn't make the person bad).

sweetsoca
11-26-2003, 11:22 AM
I appreciate all of your comments and concerns. However, we did what works for our family.

My son may well have been a trail blazer with dreads and that may still happen down the road. He's a gifted student with excellent grades who reads at an 12th grade level, plays chess as well as football and baseball. So he definitely would have distinguished himself from the crowd with his locs.

Maybe as he gets older and his hair grows longer we'll revisit the dreads decision, but right now it works for us.

Schiffon
11-26-2003, 02:41 PM
I have no comment on the decision that Sweetsoc and her DH have made. My only comment is on the pervasive racial profiling that is going on in this country. For example, cops who practice racial profiling won't know or care that Sweetsoca'a son is an honor student when they see him walking in a neighborhood that is predominately caucasian. Sadly, he probably will, at some point in his life, even without "stereotypical" dress and hair experience police harassment. Like strawwberryz asserted, the "red flag" for prejudice is his race, and only a serious social revolution is going to make our young men safe.

linn
11-26-2003, 02:43 PM
Originally posted by strawwberryz@Nov 25 2003, 11:39 PM
Society, society!

Today it is the locs. Tomorrow it will be his braids. The next day his cornrows. That afternoon the bike he was riding. The next year it will be his friends. The year after that whatever he is, he will fit the description, like all black men in America.

The common denominator and the one constant is being black.

Sadly, we cant change being black.
ITA!!

When I was younger, everybody thought the locers were Rastas or "bud heads". How times have changed. You cannot control how people view your son. Some people would have a problem with him if he wore braids, a conk, bald, an afro, etc... But the real problem they have is with him being a black male, pure and simple.

Just my .02

toy
11-26-2003, 03:08 PM
i agree with everyone else who've said it's the skin color and not the locs that are the primary issue here. i suppose it's good that you and your husband feel good about your decision, but IMHO, what you're feeling is a false sense of security if you think taking down his locs will make any difference whatsoever in the way he is perceived by those who are limited in their thinking.

there are plenty of successful black men and women in today's society who haven't been "held back" by their locs. shoot, there are many examples right here on this board.

tangytic
11-26-2003, 04:15 PM
Schiffon, Strawberryz and Toy

:thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup

So many of us here spent soooooooooooo many years wearing every non-natural hairstyle under the sun trying to fit in and be less threatening to society at large and now we have made a conscious decision to stop doing that. Great great posts ladies I need to meet more sistas like yall!

HarrieNaps
11-26-2003, 04:31 PM
I know that you and your DH have your reasons for making the decision, but I wanted to know how does your son feel about taking down his locs ?

sweetsoca
11-26-2003, 05:06 PM
I totally understand where everyone is coming from. And we in no way are trying to make him more "likeable". In fact he has not received any negative feedback since wearing his dreads. And most WF claim they like it, which of course did not enter into our decision.

We have NEVER nor will we ever force our son on anyone. He's outspoken and he has an opinion on everything, so to some that can be misconstrued as a child who doesn't know his place. To us (my dh and me) he's OUR special gift, so anyone else can take him or leave him. We believe we've raised him to be respectful but to be no one's push-over. He knows how to stand up for himself.

We can't change society's current perceptions of our young black males. In fact we told him just last night that as an AA male, he has to work 2x as hard as his white classmates for 1/2 the credit. No matter how badly we want him to go to college, it has to come from within him. Where they will get a free pass, he'll have to earn his way every time.

Additionally, despite all our best intentions, we are not under the impression that because he's no longer loced that he won't still be subject to discriminatory practices by the PD at some point in his life.

@ Harrie - My son respects our decision and knows we're only doing it for his protection such as it is. He's OK with the twa.

SoulStar
11-26-2003, 06:44 PM
If you would have stand firm in keeping his locs, he would have been a stronger youth. We live in a society that is constantly portraying the black race as savages. Maybe you should have given him a choice to keep them because your showing him that in order for him to be accepted he must assimilate into society's norms. That's teaching him that he needs to change everytime his people or shown negatively. And if that is the case, you might as well teach him to bleach his skin and perm his hair because our hair is percieved as nappy and unmanagable to the white world....

Nappalonia
11-26-2003, 06:48 PM
Originally posted by SoulStar@Nov 26 2003, 01:44 PM
If you would have stand firm in keeping his locs, he would have been a stronger youth. We live in a society that is constantly portraying the black race as savages. Maybe you should have given him a choice to keep them because your showing him that in order for him to be accepted he must assimilate into society's norms. That's teaching him that he needs to change everytime his people or shown negatively. And if that is the case, you might as well teach him to bleach his skin and perm his hair because our hair is percieved as nappy and unmanagable to the white world....
:thumbsup

:tiptoe

sweetsoca
11-26-2003, 07:00 PM
Originally posted by SoulStar@Nov 26 2003, 02:44 PM
If you would have stand firm in keeping his locs, he would have been a stronger youth. We live in a society that is constantly portraying the black race as savages. Maybe you should have given him a choice to keep them because your showing him that in order for him to be accepted he must assimilate into society's norms. That's teaching him that he needs to change everytime his people or shown negatively. And if that is the case, you might as well teach him to bleach his skin and perm his hair because our hair is percieved as nappy and unmanagable to the white world....
@Soulstar - Since Bleaching our skin is NOT part of MY reality I'll totally disregard your diatribe for what it is.

He still loves his black self regardless of whether he wears locs or not and white folx perception of him will not change that either.

FoxyLox
11-26-2003, 09:51 PM
I have to say that after reading all the post in this thread, I am very frustrated. I agree wholeheartedly with everyone in favor of the child being able to wear his locs despite society's preception of them. I am, however, confused about why the poster, posted this thread about taking down her son's locs, but will let him wear braids/cornrows, twa or any other nappy styles that receive the same negative opinion by whomever deems them unacceptable. I just don't get it. Maybe i'm missing something, Aynbody???
Also, not that you have to, but did you and hubby ask your son if he wanted to keep his locs? Seems like you've reared a very intelligent and bright child? How does he feel? If he grows them now or grows them later, won't they still be locs? Won't there always be begrudgers of locs? at least in his lifetime?

Beryl
11-26-2003, 10:41 PM
Originally posted by MuthaErth@Nov 25 2003, 06:50 PM
i'm the proud mother of 5 loced children. my children are on honor roll, and are good kids and the way they dress or the way they wear their hair is a form of expression and self-pride.
Bravo to you Mutha! When they grow up, your children will benefit by what they are learning from you now. You won't see them compromising when they enter the workforce.

A Compaq commercial features a black youth grabbing a high powered computer from a woman hanging from the ceiling (ala Mission Impossible). The youth had locs and represented one smart (and attractive) brother.

Guess it depends on which images to which you choose to react.

angielocks
11-27-2003, 01:48 AM
Originally posted by dewdrop+Nov 26 2003, 01:49 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (dewdrop @ Nov 26 2003, 01:49 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-sweetsoca@Nov 25 2003, 09:53 AM

It seems that there is alot of violence in our local community being committed by young black men with dreadlocks so almost every night we turn on the news and there&#39;s a picture of some guy wanted or accused wearing dreads.
Personally, I would have kept the locs only because I would want to teach the world that not EVERY dread head in that area is bad and commits crimes. There are good ones too, strong, powerful, and he would be a walking example. [/b][/quote]
ITA!

mochacaremel
11-27-2003, 02:09 PM
Originally posted by Beryl@Nov 26 2003, 06:41 PM
A Compaq commercial features a black youth grabbing a high powered computer from a woman hanging from the ceiling (ala Mission Impossible). The youth had locs and represented one smart (and attractive) brother.


I peeped this commercial too, I almost hurt my neck trying to see his hair...big ups to Compaq!

Mocha

PrincessDrRe
11-29-2003, 01:50 AM
:-x I find it highly interesting that we have (once again) begun to change hairstyles to conform to society. I am sad that you allowed yourself and your son to be manipulated by the media and by negative outside forces. I agree with the previous post, this is not about being in a gang. What if this would have been a part of your religion?

I must post this question however, (and this has been stated by others in this post), How will you change the color of his skin when he begans to get grief about his skincolor? ***scene one--"Oh, you see that boy over there? Yeah, he&#39;s one of them. How do I know? Well, look how black he is?......." :mad

sonshinescoils
08-02-2004, 05:30 AM
bump

moonchild
08-02-2004, 05:46 AM
This is your son being discussed here and I in NO WAY want to disrespect your Creator-given role as his mother. However...

In this society we tend to teach our children many lessons in FEAR. I can not help but wonder that, in altering your son&#39;s hair, you have not enrolled him in Lesson #1....

What a different world we&#39;d have if we&#39;d operate out of faith rather than fear.

I wonder if in fact, you and your husband had not already been toying with the idea of removing his locs prior to what was on the evening news.

karimarie
08-02-2004, 05:57 AM
i&#39;m just reading this thread shaking my head. i&#39;m not an expert on locs - but i am an expert on living life according to the rules of "don&#39;t ruffle any feathers". i live in a predominately white neighborhood - am adopted by a white family - live with a white aunt and uncle - and am constantly "adapting" myself it seems in preparation for that feeling that overcomes one in my situation. it&#39;s like constantly knowing that you - and only you - are some "map" for others to "gage" the whole black population by. What Kari does suddenly EXPLAINS every other black person they may be in contact with. I seriously believe this is why I pressed my hair even though I stopped perming it 7 years ago. I seriously believe this is why i&#39;ve "toned" myself down - because I&#39;ve had this dead person on my back (lets call him OTHER PEOPLE&#39;S EXPECTATIONS) for all these years. So when I made the decision to loc (today ... lol) and told my family they were shocked. They honestly (and I was a bit shocked by their reaction, almost) wanted to talk myself out of it. My uncle told me that "if you weren&#39;t so flighty - I&#39;d really have somethin to say - but I know you&#39;ll change your mind, eventually" I laughed and told him: I have my nose pierced. My job in "corporate" america has not made me take it out. I&#39;ll have dreds - I&#39;m not changing my mind. I&#39;m a taurus - need I say more? And telling me that I can&#39;t do something? Man - that just gave me power to be SURE to do it.

I&#39;m not responsible for what every white person (or black or asian or whatever) thinks of black people. And I&#39;m so tired of having to worry about it. I&#39;m ONE person - I speak for Kari.

Sorry for the rant, but - it just makes me so angry when we have to think about things like this... like "fitting some profile because ONE other person who had my hair did something that wasn&#39;t correct." and yet I am taught to look at people individually and not look at ONE white person badly because of what MILLIONS of them did to my ancestors or what plenty have done to me. Maybe being so young is too difficult to have this added responsibility. Maybe a child shouldn&#39;t need to "rise above the ignorance" to make a stand on racism and profiling and what not - but then I have to ask this: if not him then who? And if not now - then when?

Regardless of the decision - I have nothing but respect and understanding for the process/conflict. Believe that.

mochacaremel
08-02-2004, 07:13 AM
Wow Karimarie, that was a deep post, thanks for sharing.

And you bring up a good point, how many times do we see Korean&#39;s saying "I gotta get rid of this black hair, too many criminal Korean&#39;s have it."

Or Whites saying the same about being blond in common with criminals?

Although I agree with most of you in this thread, I do feel an undercurrent of fear because if this mother really is thinking like this, the tension in her community must be ROUGH.

This is my bottom line: I wouldn&#39;t have my child uncomfortable or in harm&#39;s way due to how his hair is. It&#39;s not worth my child&#39;s safety to prove that he has freedom to wear...

EPHIPHANY! I just realized what I was about to type. I guess I wouldn&#39;t risk safety for freedom (for my child). I would keep the "shackles" on to ensure my child is safe. I would risk safety for freedom for myself however.

How deep is that?

Mocha

karimarie
08-02-2004, 07:42 AM
Mocha - EXACTLY. That&#39;s why while I can be angry about how things are - a part of me has to have respect for it being that way and for her choice. Especially with a CHILD. The burden is hard enough as an adult...

it&#39;s really deep, ain&#39;t it? so deep it brings tears to my eyes.

moonchild
08-02-2004, 07:53 AM
@Karimarie - I can tell your post truly came straight from the heart. Preach!!! I could hear you talking.

@Mocha - What an epiphany, huh? And do "shackles" really ensure safety? Or spiritual death?

I&#39;m really feeling you all on looking at the deeper issues. Sometimes we say it&#39;s just hair and it&#39;s true. But at times it really is something bigger than hair isn&#39;t it.

thunderstorm
08-02-2004, 01:51 PM
@ sweetsoca,

i think i understand your concern. and i won&#39;t pass judgment on you for doing what you think is necessary to protect your son where you live.

sometimes you HAVE to be concerned with how you look and the image you present to others. i know i wouldn&#39;t want my son mistaken as a threat or assumed to be a hoodlum because of the way he wears his hair or clothes.

we won&#39;t let our son dress with the baggy pants, oversized, long white t-shirts, bandanas or headbands. where we live, there are too many gang members and wannabe gangster thugs sporting this style. as long as our son depends on our $$ to clothe him, we&#39;ll be making the final determinations about what his wardrobe will look like.

my nephew wears the style i mentioned above. and where they live, there are a lot of gangs, and some of them dress that way, too. he goes to a skating rink where many young people go and some of those people are gang members or are associated with that climate. i don&#39;t approve of him being allowed to wear the clothing that looks too similar to gang-style gear. if a fight breaks out, he could easily be misconstrued with a delinquent and get hurt. it&#39;s not worth it to me.

i see where you are coming from. he&#39;s your son and you owe no justification or apology for any decision you make to keep him alive and safe during his childhood.

i discovered on this very forum that in some parts of this country, children do not have recess at school because the gang and criminal element is so out of control. for the safety of the children, they are kept indoors all day. now, if i lived in a city like this, and if many or most of the delinquent people look and dress a certain way, i would not allow my son to look or dress that way either. and i certainly wouldn&#39;t allow him to play outdoors in an area that is known for broad-day gunfire, just to prove a point to people that children deserve to play outside and that thugs will not deprive my son of fresh air and exercise. not at the expense of my son&#39;s well being. i&#39;ll agree to keep him indoors.

we don&#39;t live where she does. it&#39;s easy to judge her and say she&#39;s overreacting, but maybe we don&#39;t have the same issues to contend with on a daily basis [or at least, to the degree that she does].

yummyhoney06
08-02-2004, 03:34 PM
As I was reading through this thread I was dissappointed at how many people did not seem to understand why she would take her sons locs down. I was just about to post a long reply about the child&#39;s safety being the primary issue. He could be identified as a criminal, or in a worse case scenario, he could begin to identify with the criminals in his area.

But I see thats all been said now.

I guess I&#39;m lucky to live here in South Florida where so many people wear locs anyway. I can&#39;t recall ever being discriminated against or having to explain to anyone why I don&#39;t perm my hair.

chemist1981
08-02-2004, 05:58 PM
I understand sweetsoca is talking about... My parents would not allow me to loc my hair for the same reasons (Negative images of black males in the media). But there is fine line between protecting your child and placing shackles on your childs wrists. My parents solution to this problem was that I could only loc my hair when I had achieved the following: accepted into college and had a full scholarship. Once my parents felt I was set on a very stable path...loccing my hair became a non-issue. I thank my parents for their choice because it protected me the negative energy many of us loccers come in contact with everyday until I was able to over come it with my own positive energy.



{Peace}

SwissMocha
08-03-2004, 05:09 AM
Originally posted by dewdrop+Nov 26 2003, 12:49 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (dewdrop @ Nov 26 2003, 12:49 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteBegin-sweetsoca@Nov 25 2003, 09:53 AM

It seems that there is alot of violence in our local community being committed by young black men with dreadlocks so almost every night we turn on the news and there&#39;s a picture of some guy wanted or accused wearing dreads.
Personally, I would have kept the locs only because I would want to teach the world that not EVERY dread head in that area is bad and commits crimes. There are good ones too, strong, powerful, and he would be a walking example.
One more comment, then again it is how a person perceives another person based on the information that they are given. For example, if I lived in your area and heard that news, with the knowledge that I have, I wouldn&#39;t stereotype/ categorize every dread head as violent. I would think, it is just those individuals who have problems and unfortunately, they all have a common factor....wearing dreads (which isn&#39;t bad, but dreads doesn&#39;t make the person bad).
[/b][/quote]
:-? Dewdrop has pretty much said it for me

:tiptoe to another thread

luvnme1st
08-03-2004, 12:13 PM
Originally posted by mochacaremel@Aug 2 2004, 07:13 AM
tension in her community must be ROUGH.

This is my bottom line: I wouldn&#39;t have my child uncomfortable or in harm&#39;s way due to how his hair is. It&#39;s not worth my child&#39;s safety to prove that he has freedom to wear...

EPHIPHANY! I just realized what I was about to type. I guess I wouldn&#39;t risk safety for freedom (for my child). I would keep the "shackles" on to ensure my child is safe. I would risk safety for freedom for myself however.

How deep is that?

Mocha
Unfortunately, changing his hair is not going to magically guarantee him safety or freedom from being racially profiled. A hairstyle is only one factor, and when that style doesnt fit the mold, they will find something else.

At some time in our lives we have to be willing to take a stand for what we believe in. Taking a stand consists of standing firm and not conforming to the beliefs of others. Rising above, and going through. The world is changing, and it isn&#39;t changing for the better. Children would be better equipped to handle the trials & tribulations of the upcoming generation if we teach them strength, not weakness. Conforming is a form of weakness. Conforming is not about leadership but more about following. In a time when the world is so full of turbulence & pain, the last thing a child needs to be taught is to be a follower.

The most important thing we can do as parents, is to teach our children high morals and values. Teach them to stand tall, to be proud, to rise above and to do better than the those who look down upon us. When all is said and done, the only other thing left to do is pray and leave the rest in :heart God&#39;s :heart hands.

I pray that everything works out for you and your family. Many blessings to you and yours.

sha-mecca
08-03-2004, 01:59 PM
no disrespect but that&#39;s a dumb reason.
you gonna bleach his skin too?
&#39;cause i&#39;m sure its a lot of negative black images on your local news as well...

thunderstorm
08-03-2004, 03:06 PM
we all have our battles to pick. what you believe is worth fighting for and standing up for at any particular time in your life, isn&#39;t necessarily what someone else believes is worth fighting for during a particular time in her life.

doesn&#39;t make you wrong, or her right. just different people with different causes and life experiences.

BlakStaar
08-03-2004, 03:32 PM
I agree with a lot of sentiments that have been expressed by Toy, Dewdrop, MuthaEarth, among others.

I wonder if the original poster has changed her mind 8 months later? (This is from Nov 03&#39;).

Sunchild
08-03-2004, 03:33 PM
nevermind

mrscrowder
08-03-2004, 03:48 PM
ok--Here is my 2 cents--if your son is 11, an you keep him "close to the vest" how would he ever get caught up with the thugs who just happen to have dreads?? I think you and your husband are doing exactly what "they" want us to do--and ya&#39;ll took the bait. If anything wouldn&#39;t he have more of a challenge when he gets older and he&#39;s driving , and hanging out with friends, and would have a more likely time to encounter racial profiling?? You should have left him alone--let him keep his lil dreads --If his teacher is being mean, wouldn&#39;t she no matter what hair style he has? Your problem should be
with her and society not your innocent son&#39;s natural hair.

Sista do what you know is right--you let him loc for a reason--don&#39;t let those pressures change your mind.

Da Mrs!

sha-mecca
08-03-2004, 04:25 PM
Originally posted by BlakStaar@Aug 3 2004, 10:32 AM

I wonder if the original poster has changed her mind 8 months later? (This is from Nov 03&#39;).
lol well damn. i want my 2 cents back...

Llyons
08-03-2004, 10:16 PM
I guess I will save my comment...

Wonder why this was bumped?

sonshinescoils
08-03-2004, 10:39 PM
i bumped for dawn who was looking for input on locing her 3 year old daughter&#39;s hair.

http://www.nappturality.com/modules/ipboar...showtopic=33385 (http://www.nappturality.com/modules/ipboard/index.php?showtopic=33385)

Llyons
08-03-2004, 10:54 PM
Oh okay. I noticed another post was bumped regarding children and locs. I was wondering if someone was going through something similar.

Thanks for the explanation. I somehow missed Dawn&#39;s question.

Jess82
08-12-2004, 03:41 PM
That reminds me of the fact that my father didn&#39;t want my brother to wear cornrows because " alot of tugs wanted by the police wore cornorws" :nohuh I always tought it was a silly excuse... Its like accepting to conform to racial profiling in a sense... (accepting to be judged by the way we look) We have to show that just because we wear our hair a certain way doesn&#39;t mean that we are tugs or rasta, ect If the tugs start wearings braids then he&#39;ll take his braids down?

Kdeuce001
08-13-2004, 11:35 AM
i just want to say that. Your son seems to be smart and a bright young man. I know he will go far having parents that love him. What does he have to say about any of this? You know these days you can divorce your parent @ 11...lol but seriously how did he feel about it?

Kdeuce