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Aje_Templar
07-07-2006, 09:58 PM
Documentary reveals the original 50 Cent

March 25, 2005

BY CARLITO RODRIGUEZ


http://www.suntimes.com/output/music/wkp-n...nt25north.html# (http://www.suntimes.com/output/music/wkp-news-cent25north.html#)


NEW YORK -- As hip-hop grows older, its mythology expands.

Like the general populace's fascination with Prohibition-era mobsters, urban underworld legends like L.A.'s Freeway Ricky Ross, New York's Pappy Mason and D.C.'s Wayne Perry get top billing.

Recognizing this nostalgia of sorts, the new documentary DVD series ''The Infamous Times'' has just hit stores with a profile on ''the original 50 Cent,'' a stick-up kid from Brooklyn who made his reputation by robbing and shooting his way into New York City's street lexicon during the 1980s.

Unless you've been in a cryogenic snooze these last few years, you're already familiar with the rapper 50 Cent. But you've probably never heard of the person who created that name. Yet you've heard his story, and a million others that took place during America's Golden Age of Crack.

Hosted by journalist (and self-described convicted felon) Bonz Malone, the DVD features interviews with contemporaries of 50 Cent the gangster plus rap music notables, including the rapper born Curtis Jackson, who unapologetically declares, ''I'm named after a gangster from Fort Greene projects.''

According to the documentary, Kelvin Darnell Martin was born July 24, 1964, in the Bronx and was raised by his paternal grandmother. As a child, he loved to read -- and to fight. Due in no small part to his toughness, his elementary school friends dubbed him ''Lil' Shaft,'' after the classic Richard Roundtree film.

Martin moved to the R.V. Ingersoll housing project in the Fort Greene section of Brooklyn as a teenager. Somewhere along the way, he developed a thirst for the bling-bling of the American dream, though he still maintained his passion for reading. But while the average high school student was weighing post-graduation options, the documentary says Martin was earning money the old fashioned way -- by stealing it.

Though he stood only 5-foot-2 and weighed about 120 pounds after a big meal, Martin's ever-present .357 and .44 Magnums let him out-macho some of Brooklyn's hardest thugs. Pledging no allegiance to any one crew, Martin terrorized the drug dealers who were sending New York's homicide rate into the stratosphere. Some of the more strategically minded would often ''hire'' him for protection (from him, of course).

Every generation has its heroes, for lack of a better word. How different is one generation's predilection for Martin from another's love affair with Clyde Barrow, Lucky Luciano or John Gotti?

''We pine so hard for archetype anti-heroes,'' says ''Infamous Times'' creator/producer Tone Boots, ''that we cling to criminals rather than political activists. We've become disenfranchised with the system and anyone who represents it.''

By the time he was killed a few months after his 23rd birthday, Martin was estimated to have committed about 30 murders, according to ''One Arm Monk,'' who identified himself in the documentary as Martin's fence.

Though it may be easy to write Martin off as another two-dimensional B-movie character, those who stood on the friendly side of Martin's .357 disagree.

Cheryl ''Blackie'' Wray, the Bonnie to his Clyde, says, ''He wanted to be welcomed. ... You could tell he was raised with morals and values," she says on the DVD without a trace of irony. ''He'd take off his hat. Open the door.''

AP




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Ayaba
07-10-2006, 10:14 AM
Unless you've been in a cryogenic snooze these last few years, you're already familiar with the rapper 50 Cent. [/b]
and unless you've been living in francophone Africa and really, really do not like rap. :lol: :lol:

PatientDykeNYC
07-11-2006, 08:16 PM
NAMASTE EVERYBODY!

thanks for posting this OP. it was a nice read. as i was reading i suddenly got to


Hosted by journalist (and self-described convicted felon) Bonz Malone, the DVD features interviews with contemporaries of 50 Cent the gangster plus rap music notables, including the rapper born Curtis Jackson, who unapologetically declares, ''I'm named after a gangster from Fort Greene projects.''
[/b]

i used to live up the street from ingersoll houses. now that's a case study in gentrification! that neighborhood is almost all co-ops and condos now.

love,
PDnyc

Aje_Templar
07-12-2006, 01:32 PM
NAMASTE EVERYBODY!

thanks for posting this OP. it was a nice read. as i was reading i suddenly got to
i used to live up the street from ingersoll houses. now that's a case study in gentrification! that neighborhood is almost all co-ops and condos now.

love,
PDnyc
[/b]


That's exactly how it works. When the white power structure wants our property, they make the conditions right so that we'll run ourselves out. They'll allow crime to go up until the residents come begging the authorities for help, then they come in and take the property back with force, running the low income residents into other places. Because the bulk of the Black masses do not understand the concept of social engineering, it works like clockwork.

mimi
07-13-2006, 03:56 PM
This is who 50cent name himself after. Great...this hows much he thinks. Rather shows how he views the world