PDA

View Full Version : Raised Beds



erinm
09-05-2007, 06:01 PM
I really want to start a vegetable garden next spring, and I thought I'd start early.

I live in Houston, and the soil is sort of cruddy, so I'm going to make a raised bed. I've been reading about Lasagna Gardening (http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf582744.tip.html), and thought that might be a good way start. Has anyone ever done it before?

From what I've read so far, it's been described as "sheet composting," but I've never composted anything either. I want to start with a combination of fresh grass clippings and leaves--but leaves are scarce this time of year, and I've read that shredded newspaper would work just as well. Does that sound like a horrible idea?
And is there anyway to incorporate vegetable kitchen scraps without attracting scavengers?

:help:

deecoily
09-05-2007, 06:39 PM
I really want to start a vegetable garden next spring, and I thought I'd start early.

I live in Houston, and the soil is sort of cruddy, so I'm going to make a raised bed. I've been reading about Lasagna Gardening (http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf582744.tip.html), and thought that might be a good way start. Has anyone ever done it before?

From what I've read so far, it's been described as "sheet composting," but I've never composted anything either. I want to start with a combination of fresh grass clippings and leaves--but leaves are scarce this time of year, and I've read that shredded newspaper would work just as well. Does that sound like a horrible idea?
And is there anyway to incorporate vegetable kitchen scraps without attracting scavengers?

:help:
[/b]

OooOooOoo I do the raised garden bed thing for my veggies. My soil is pretty ordinary around the house so I started doing this last year. It's easy and you don't get weeds like you do if you dig out in the dirt. I used mushroom compost because I didn't have much success with the home composting thing... but I'm still trying. Luckily I have horse manure which I mulch and use for layering. You can use newspaper. I did. Scavengers are a problem, which is why I didn't use vegetable scraps. I used newspaper, manure, soil and straw.

aquababie19
09-05-2007, 07:34 PM
i want to start composting. i was thinking about get one of those containers that you can turn.

deecoily
09-05-2007, 10:05 PM
^^ those r the best kind. I don't have one because it's too windy up here.

euridice
09-07-2007, 07:15 PM
ahhh I just love playing in the dirt. I'm a dirt dobber for real. I have a garden that I am continually improving upon, but I just don't have the time like I wish. This year I got composted leaves from the local ag department here ... boy did that freshen up my garden. The soil was so soft that when I walked on it, it felt like I was sinking in it a bit. I had tomatoes out the wazoo ... and the best strang bangs :lol: also some good peppers. Now I'm prepping to sow mustards and rape ... those greens make the best soup!!

erinm
09-08-2007, 11:01 AM
Thanks for the tips Dee. I'll look into the mushroom compost.

The county fair is starting soon must be somewhere I can find some horse manure. :icon_ShiftyEye:

swingbolder
10-22-2007, 06:00 PM
I just took a workshop on composting at a rural farm expo near where I live. The lady from the extension office said not to put any meat or oils in your compost because those are the things that attract critters. So if you have leftover salad with dressing on it don't add it to the pile, but plain old scraps are fine.

My husband dug a compost pit last weekend for the winter. He lined it with cement blocks for stability and chicken wire on the bottom and sides to keep out moles. And something about using earthworms in it to get it ready for spring. After he adds the worms he will cover it with burlap and hay. Once you set it up apparently you don't have to turn it because the worms just do their thing. He's ordering the earthworms from Cap Cod Worm Farm, which is owned and run by an octogenarian black woman in Massachusetts (I think she's a natural head :) :

http://archive.southcoasttoday.com/daily/04-00/04-25-00/muncover.jpg

Here is a link to her site with more information on earthworm composting:

http://www.capecodwormfarm.com/index.asp

erinm
10-23-2007, 07:39 PM
I've started a little mini compost pile following these directions: http://www.yougrowgirl.com/garden/urbancomposting.php

I want to get worms, but I'm a wuss. :blush: How am I going to garden walking around afraid of some worms? :rolleyes:

tlwnurse
01-08-2008, 12:08 PM
I have been composting for 2 years now.(It's amazing how time flies). Bought the worms at a fishing supply place. They came in a plastic containger. Just basically dumped the worms into the compost. They will do their own thing. It's made a difference in my garden. When it's time to pot I just go to the compost and add a bit to enrich the soil. Has also cut down on my potting soil costs. Additionally, any uncooked fruits or veggies that start to go bad in the fridge, I throw them in there. The good thing is I've found it pretty much takes care of its self.

tlwnurse
03-22-2008, 08:57 AM
Where are the composting folks at?????

lifeAgift
04-06-2008, 07:31 PM
My family compost all our vegan kithcen scraps.

Works wonders. Saves on trash, we recycle too and we have a rich base for our yard and organic fertilizer for our pot gardern.

It's so so easy!

jorjeni
05-10-2009, 11:25 PM
I am been learning composting and trying to out which would be the best way for me to get started. I already have 3 bags of leaves to get started with but I don't know if I want to get a bin I found one at Sam's club for $40 or make one from a rubbermaid trash can with holes in it so I can roll it around. My neighbors have 3 composts bins and I see them out there with a pitch fork turning them that way.

I was wondering if I do the bin out in the yard can I also put the worms in it or are the worms just for the smaller type composting of kitchen scraps?