PDA

View Full Version : Obama: Wife Won't Let Me Run Again



Justice
12-29-2007, 07:10 AM
WILLIAMSBURG, Iowa (CNN) — Barack Obama told an Iowa audience Friday that his wife Michelle thinks he should not run for president again if he loses in 2008.

“One of the things I offer in this race is that we still remember what it means to be normal," said the Illinois senator.

"My wife and I were talking the other day. And she said 'We're not doing this again'. And those of you who met her know she doesn't mince words,” said Obama. “She meant that in eight years, I'm not sure we'll be the same people we are now."

He said that he and his wife had only recently finished paying off their own student loans and started saving for their kids' college education. He also said that, until recently, he would do the family's grocery shopping himself. He said Michele told him, "eight years from now we will have lost touch with what ordinary Americans are going through" and that "we'll be in a different orbit."

"I think when you're in Washington for a long time you lose touch" and "it becomes harder to relinquish power,” he added.

But he told the audience in this blue-collar town, "my wife still shops at Target."

In the new issue of Vanity Fair, Michelle Obama tells a reporter that when it comes to her husband's White House bid, “it’s now or never.”


“We’re not going to keep running and running and running, because at some point you do get the life beaten out of you. It hasn’t been beaten out of us yet," she tells the magazine. "We need to be in there now, while we’re still fresh and open and fearless and bold. You lose some of that over time. Barack is not cautious yet; he’s ready to change the world, and we need that.”

Obama was responding to question from an undecided voter on executive power, and whether the senator would be willing to relinquish some of the power that President Bush has accrued.

Approached after the event, the undecided voter who asked the question said he hopes if Obama loses this time that he does run again: "I think he could make a good President," said Paul Kessler. But he told CNN that he's still uncommitted: "I'm going to read every candidates' website and decide on policy. Not emotion."

UPDATE: Later in an interview with CNN, Obama wouldn't say if his comments suggested he would not run for president again if he were to lose his current bid.

"Well, I intend to reelection after my first term," he said with a smile.

–CNN's Jessica Yellin



I came across this article on CNN. Reading the article I was bit :unsure: . I don't know, for some reason it just doesn't sit well with me that a man who wants to be President would say "my wife said no". I love Obama! He's my 1st pick but how much confidence can you put in a man who would 'give up' if he doesn't get the White House the first time around. Michelle was saying that they will be different people if they spend too much time in D.C. And that was probably the most disturbing...does she want to be in Washington or not. The Obamas are never going to be 'normal' again. Even if he doesn't get the bid, he'll always be the first Minority who had a real shot at getting it. Maybe I'm focusing on the wrong thing. I'm just a bit concerned that to some he'll come off a being a little less committed to the 'fight' because that's the first impression I got. And after skimming through some of the comments it seems that most people think it's a ploy to 'guilt' people into voting for him now instead of maybe 2012...

What do you ladies think of the article?

minacakes
12-29-2007, 07:31 AM
it doesn't change my opinion of him. i agree w/his wife that after being in Washington for a while YOU DO loose touch w/what real people go thru. It becomes about lobbying and doing favors for this person and getting in good w/that person etc instead of really being fresh and wanting change.
Just think about any job you have. i know for me...when i first start somewhere i see a bunch of areas where there can be change, i bring a new perspective, new ideas etc. After being there a few years, i'm no longer the one w/the fresh ideas. AFter hearing no that work b/c of this and we can't do that b/c of this etc, i become much more complacent.
I honestly think that if the lost the first time, running again is not going to increase his chances of winning. This is his prime. if he loses now, i don't think that not running again is quitting. he can still make a difference w/out being president. Acutally, he can probably make MORE of a difference w/out being one. He's already opened doors for the young people around today. I also like the fact that he's not afraid to admit that he values his wife's opinion. REAL PEOPLE in the REAL WORLD who are married have to consider what thier spouses think about thier career decisions. You don't hear the older, more experienced, candidates talking about that stuff b/c again...they've been at it and have lost touch.

gigglezk
12-29-2007, 07:35 AM
IMO, I think you're focusing on the wrong thing. Michelle and Barack are focusing on their family first. I would love to see him run again (whether he wins or loses) and would be hurt if he didn't. But I totally understand them putting their family first.

What's so different about him not running again if he loses versus Al Gore not running again this year or last year? One can only take so much. Campaigning is rough work and in a way it does change you because you do miss out on things you'd rather be doing. And, just my thought, but I think her comment about Washington changing a person has more to do with how people become power hungry and they lose their focus on why they ran in the first place.

So I don't see anything wrong with him not wanting to run again if he loses, although I think he should, to focus on the most important people in his life. It makes no sense for him to keep dragging his family through this over and over. IMO, if folks don't wake up and vote him in now, then he probably isn't going to get it in 2012. All this "I think he needs to wait" is just b.s in my book. If not now, when? Its like Michelle said "its now or never". I'd rather people vote him now because they believe in him and not in 2012 because they realized they made a mistake and voted wrong the first time around.

bajanempress
12-29-2007, 07:57 AM
I actually find it endearing that his wife's opinion means so much to him. To me that is the sign of a strong man, one who is secure enough in himself that he can admit that she has a say in what he does.

gigglezk
12-29-2007, 08:00 AM
I actually find it endearing that his wife's opinion means so much to him. To me that is the sign of a strong man, one who is secure enough in himself that he can admit that she has a say in what he does.
[/b]


I KNOW!!!! THAT is why I love them so much. They are such a beautiful couple. Has anyone seen this? If love isn't shining on them, then I don't know what is.


Obama Holiday Greeting (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmB937L0bDY)

:wub: :wub:

Justice
12-29-2007, 01:30 PM
I actually find it endearing that his wife's opinion means so much to him. To me that is the sign of a strong man, one who is secure enough in himself that he can admit that she has a say in what he does.
[/b]

That's the thing, an opinion is one thing, telling another person he can or cannot do something is different. The article starts off with Michelle's opinion...that he should not run again...but quickly turns into "my wife said I can't". I kept reading and waiting for the joking or even half-joking nature behind the remark but there was none. He basically said, "she said no and that's the end of it". I'm all for family, and I love how family-oriented he is, but ONE person's opinion should not be 'law' in any relationship. She has her opinion...great. Obama being President will effect her way more than it would effect me but still... I think it would have been best if he focused on why he should be elected now instead of his wife not letting him run in 2012 if he doesn't make it.

I would like a President who is capable of making desicions himself, if the wife or anyone else has an opinion, cool, take that into consideration, but someone else's opinion should not be the end of it. Having a say in what your husband does...that's great...telling your husband what to do...a bit too much.

gigglezk
12-29-2007, 02:09 PM
Are you married? Seriously. I tell my husband what I think all the time. That doesn't mean I'm saying he can't do something. That doesn't mean its the law. The article says she doesn't think he should try again. It doesn't say he isn't because she says so. She said "'We're not doing this again." but who's to say her opinion doesn't change by then or next month or even next week. She is being realistic and honest with Barack.

Also, I still haven't read where he said "I'm not doing it because Michelle said I can't." That's putting words into his mouth. In fact, he never even said he wouldn't run again. I think your making a mountain out of a mole hill that isn't even there.

bajanempress
12-29-2007, 02:18 PM
Something_Like_a_Lawyer I find your reaction puzzling, it seems more typical of men to categorise men who listen to their wives as being "henpecked".

I'm not married but I too voice my opinion to my bf. One night last week I expressly told him I didn't want him going out with a particular client because that person has a proclivity for strip clubs and prostitutes. He could have gone and I would have trusted him not to get involved in the activities but I didn't want it to come to that. Because he values my opinion he didn't go, not because I made him do anything but because there is a give and take in any relationship.

Michelle has sacrificed a lot and she has the additional worry of her husband being a black man in the bid for president. You know how afraid she must be for his safety and that of the children? I totally get her point. I can see her saying that this is the only time they'll do it. In fact this is her compromising now because earlier reports said she was against him running. Since she has compromised this time the next time around it will be his turn to yield to her wishes of not running again.

JustAnotherNappyGirl
12-29-2007, 03:07 PM
I would like a President who is capable of making desicions himself, if the wife or anyone else has an opinion, cool, take that into consideration, but someone else's opinion should not be the end of it. Having a say in what your husband does...that's great...telling your husband what to do...a bit too much.[/b]

You're ignoring the fact that there's no such thing as a solo campaign for a married candidate...running for president requires a full-time commitment from both spouses. Either they are both 100% behind the effort or it's pretty much doomed - it would be extremely difficult to make a successful bid for the White House with a reluctant or half-hearted "other half". Obama clearly loves and honors his wife enough to respect her statement that she is not able or willing to make this kind of push again.

Justice
12-30-2007, 08:44 AM
I'm not the type of person who likes to repeat things over and over...if there is a need to clarify something I try my best to do so. That was the point of my second post. I felt the first was a little vague. I am not sure how my marital status would allow me to read words differently. Unless something has recently changed, "won't" is not an ambiguous word. There is only one way to read the word. It is not open for interpretation. The title of the article was ‘My Wife Won’t Let Me Run Again’…now, I realize that I’m a bit more analytical than most but still even I could only read that as one person not allowing another person to do something else. That is what I have a problem with. He is running for PRESIDENT. This is not a decision that was made overnight. I, personally, think it was bit weird for a partner to make a comment such as this. This is not like telling a mate that you don’t like him going to strip clubs or that you don’t want pizza again for dinner. C’mon! He has the opportunity to change the lives of billions. I, personally, feel that it makes them (or at least her) seem a little less committed to the fight for the White House. “A Change is Coming” is one of his slogans! Change doesn’t happen overnight…

Think about it. Where would we be if other spouses basically forbade the other from doing the very thing that changed the world? Coretta Scott King…Betty Shabazz...Winnie Mandela. Yes, it was tough for them…as wives, as mothers, as a family. But someone has to do it! Someone has to step up to the plate and affect change! If you have a spouse who is truly committed to changing humanity…you owe it to him/her to stand strong behind him/her…voice your opinion…that’s fine. But sacrifice is part of the game. Although there is a Mr. and Mrs. Obama, she is not running for President…they are not running for President…he is. She will not have any official duties if he is elected. They are not campaigning together…she is there to support her husband…her Presidential candidate. It’s hard to have faith in someone with one foot out the door. That’s all I’m saying.

I’m very aware of what goes on in a relationship, despite the fact that I lack a marriage certificate. And I never used to term ‘henpecked’ or somehow implied that Obama should not value his wife’s opinion. If the roles were reversed, woman running and husband said no re-run, my opinion would be the same…would yours? It seems that I’m looking at it from a political standpoint, while others are looking at the household dynamics. This was found in the political section, not ‘Lifestyles’. I also found it interesting that the original title of the article on CNN was changed to ‘Now or Never’ shortly after my posting. Coincidence? <_<

And for the record, Al Gore ran for President in 1988, losing the Democratic nomination to Mike Dukakis. Therefore, he ran for President, lose the nomination, served as Vice-President for 8 years, ran for President, won the nomination, and lost the White House.

gigglezk
12-30-2007, 08:54 AM
I asked if you were married (or a serious relationship) because a conversation between two married people is a lot different. And once again I&#39;m still trying to find where Obama said "Michelle won&#39;t let me run again." Find that for me. A direct quote, NOT an article title. With that said, you no longer need to repeat yourself because I&#39;m not going to. Simply put, my opinion is your looking too deeply into a pool that is shallow.

britni
12-30-2007, 10:08 AM
I read the article last night and I agree with the majority here, but I can see lawyer&#39;s veiwpoint.

snicy
12-30-2007, 01:56 PM
I think that Michelle Obama has every right to tell her husband that they are not doing this again if he doesn&#39;t win. He can&#39;t run for president by himself and they are probably getting threats everyday. Michelle Obama is not only a presidential candidate&#39;s wife, she is also a wife and a mother and I could totally see this conversation taking place. They are a team and it makes sense to me that he takes her opinion very seriously. I can kind of see the lawyer&#39;s point of view, but the article doesn&#39;t change my mind about him at all. He still has my vote.

JustAnotherNappyGirl
12-30-2007, 04:02 PM
They are not campaigning together…[/b]

I think Michelle and every other spouse of a serious presidential candidate would disagree with this statement. A run for the white house is a joint effort. They do it together or the campaign fails.

ThummyB
12-31-2007, 09:39 AM
Couple of things...

#1 I think that the intent of the author was to make Obama seem &#39;henpecked&#39; (hence the title that the author chose for the article), so its really too bad that you fell right into that trap.

#2 I concur that nowhere in the article does it say that he won&#39;t re-run in 4 yrs. Hell when we elected him in Illinois he stated that he wouldn&#39;t run for president in &#39;08, and we can all see how that played out.

#3 I think that it is naive to assume that no other president or political figure has made a decision b/c their spouse influenced them. Obama was simply open and honest about his wife&#39;s influence in their marriage and family. Many women have that same influence over their powerful husbands...it is just less advertisied.

#4 As has been stated &#39;they&#39; ARE running for president. Anyone well versed in political campaigning can speak to the importance of the candidate&#39;s spouse and children. Everyone has to participate in this effort, so I am sure that Michelle is not the 1st family member to have an opinion on the direction of the family and the candidate&#39;s career.

#5 I guess it comes down to what you are 1st...a husband/father or political figure. Regardless of his role in politics, Obama has still chosen to enter into a marriage and be a husband and father 1st. That means taking the feeling of your wife and children into account. You can&#39;t get married and then decide to flip the script and make it all about you. It just doesn&#39;t work like that.

#6 I just have to reiterate that there is no quote in the article that says that he won&#39;t re-run in 4 yrs. I feel like you based your entire argument on the title of the article, which was made up by the author (who obviously has an agenda). You really can&#39;t say that he&#39;s not re-running b/c his wife won&#39;t let him unless you really have evidence of that. All that you have evidence of is that is wife would prefer that they not run again, and that he will take that into consideration if she still feels that way in 4 yrs.

anabwi
12-31-2007, 09:58 AM
Only thing I could focus on was the "8 years". Is she assuming he&#39;d get re-elected or did I misread something?

Lady-N-Black
12-31-2007, 10:50 AM
Couple of things...
#4 As has been stated &#39;they&#39; ARE running for president. Anyone well versed in political campaigning can speak to the importance of the candidate&#39;s spouse and children. Everyone has to participate in this effort, so I am sure that Michelle is not the 1st family member to have an opinion on the direction of the family and the candidate&#39;s career.
[/b]


Exactly! I doubt she smacked him upside the head and informed him of what they will/will not do, but "My wife won&#39;t let me" Or "My husband won&#39;t let me" is sometimes a phrase used loosely among married couples when their spouse feels strongly about something. And yes, she has every right to have an equal say so in weither or not they run again.

Whatever affects him in this election also affects her. If he has to deal with death threats so does she, as she is his companion and wife, if he has to keep his image up so does she, so do her children- lest he be pegged as "The man who can&#39;t control his family so therefore can&#39;t possibly run a country." Not only are all of his actions spotlighted in the media but hers as well.

I&#39;m glad he would take so much consideration in her opinion. Anything less would make him (to me) a patriarchal bastard and I certainly would&#39;nt vote for him. Anything less from her would make her a grinning giggling idiot (Laura Bush) and I certainly wouldn&#39;t want that disgusting-ness in my white house.

carboncopysue
12-31-2007, 11:03 AM
Only thing I could focus on was the "8 years". Is she assuming he&#39;d get re-elected or did I misread something?
[/b]
I think their comments were a little tongue in check, like at the part:

"Well, I intend to reelection after my first term," he said with a smile


I agree with ThummyB that the article is a little biased and the writer wants to reader to think that Obama is henpecked. I think that they were stating their honest feelings and after getting pressed over and over again, they added a little humor to their comments, which the writer portrayed as hard facts.

Sue.

Mae
01-04-2008, 12:13 PM
Would folks feel as comfortable with the assertions if Hilary had said that Bill would not let her run again?

JustAnotherNappyGirl
01-04-2008, 02:01 PM
Would folks feel as comfortable with the assertions if Hilary had said that Bill would not let her run again?
[/b]

I don&#39;t see where Obama said that Michelle "would not let him run again." What she said was "We&#39;re not doing this again". And since the campaign effort requires a full-time commitment from both spouses, I would have no problem at all with Bill saying to Hillary "We&#39;re not doing this again". The key word is WE. This is something they BOTH have to want to do.

China
01-04-2008, 03:06 PM
Would folks feel as comfortable with the assertions if Hilary had said that Bill would not let her run again?
[/b]

I see where you&#39;re going but BAD example. I think most Americans look at the Clinton <strike>facade of a </strike> marriage as a political arrangement. The other difference is that Bill served 8 years in the White House himself, with her support. Now, if Elizabeth Edwards was running and John Edwards had made a similar statement, I would totally understand.

I&#39;m not married, but I agree with the majority who responded.

LaChabine
01-04-2008, 03:08 PM
The title of the article is provocative to get a reaction.

On another note: Colin Powell decided not to run from President because his wife did not want him to.

Obama or Powell, I admire a male candidate who is &#39;man enough&#39; to listen to counsel from his wife.

Plus, she&#39;s right. If Obama doesn&#39;t win this time around, she doesn&#39;t want her husband running multiple times like some of the other candidates who have, the more and more they pop up, have absolutely no chance to win and are seen as perpetual &#39;losers&#39; for it.

Sacral
01-04-2008, 03:16 PM
I agree with what everyone else is saying.

Political campaigns require the participation of both husband and wife. Period. A candidate can&#39;t run by her/himself if his/her spouse is against it. I can&#39;t even imagine such a scenario.

For married candidates, running for office is a "We" situation. The whole family has to be involved and the spouse has to be at the candidates side, even if it&#39;s just for appearances.

And Washington, DC in terms of Capital Hill can be rough on families. Since the Obamas insist upon staying in Chicago (whereas many Members of Congress with young children just move the whole family to VA or MD), coming home for just a 4-day weekend.....Or shorter........Eats away at quality family time.

Mae
01-04-2008, 05:14 PM
I see where you&#39;re going but BAD example. I think most Americans look at the Clinton <strike>facade of a </strike> marriage as a political arrangement. The other difference is that Bill served 8 years in the White House himself, with her support. Now, if Elizabeth Edwards was running and John Edwards had made a similar statement, I would totally understand.

I&#39;m not married, but I agree with the majority who responded.
[/b]

my point was not about the folks themselves but the gender differentials...I just don&#39;t think it would look like good leadership quality for a woman to say that her political career weighs heavily on what her husband thinks...I would think that asserting a strong united dedication to leadership and service would be the priority...for a man or a woman...but I am not married and my career is important enough for me to find someone who will be supportive of it...I also want my president to have a spouse and family who sees the job as important enough to have a united front....but I am just musing aloud...the fact that I am not a number one Obama fan may have something to do with my "uncomfortability" with the article...

minacakes
01-06-2008, 12:38 AM
my point was not about the folks themselves but the gender differentials...I just don&#39;t think it would look like good leadership quality for a woman to say that her political career weighs heavily on what her husband thinks[/b]

i think the reason that it would be deemed &#39;bad&#39; for a WOMAN candidate to say the same type of thing about her husband is b/c in the not so distant past, a woman would have had no choice but to do what her husband said.

kind of like the difference btw a black person and a white person making racial slurs. They can both say the same thing. But since white people actually had slaves, and <strike>were</strike> are the oppressors if they say it, it&#39;s a bigger deal.

I also don&#39;t think that Obama&#39;s wife isn&#39;t standing behind him or that the opinion he stated is far from his own convictions. I CANNOT IMAGINE him TOTALLY DISAGREEING w/his wife about this issue and then repeating what she said to a reporter! Most of the candidates who are running may not want to run again if they lose and already know it, how many of them would say that? Most candidates refrain from making those kinds of statements (i will not run again). I think Obama was saying it w/out having to say it.

Amunet
01-07-2008, 06:56 AM
That&#39;s just the reality of being married. Sure you try and compromise, but sometimes one person feels really strongly about something. There are times my husband says "no" and I know it&#39;s a firm no, that I can&#39;t persuade him out of. And there are some things I say no on and he know&#39;s I&#39;m not changing. In those situations you have to respect the other person&#39;s feeling and go with it, even if you don&#39;t like it because you have to respect your spouses wishes, even when you don&#39;t entirely agree with them.
I think that story helps me relate to the Obamas even more, to know that they are a real family and face the same problems and conflicts that we all do. It also shows their mutual respect for each other.

LadyBug13
01-08-2008, 12:34 PM
That&#39;s just the reality of being married. Sure you try and compromise, but sometimes one person feels really strongly about something. There are times my husband says "no" and I know it&#39;s a firm no, that I can&#39;t persuade him out of. And there are some things I say no on and he know&#39;s I&#39;m not changing. In those situations you have to respect the other person&#39;s feeling and go with it, even if you don&#39;t like it because you have to respect your spouses wishes, even when you don&#39;t entirely agree with them.

I think that story helps me relate to the Obamas even more, to know that they are a real family and face the same problems and conflicts that we all do. It also shows their mutual respect for each other.
[/b]


I agree.

They&#39;re like the nice Claire and Cliff Huxtable. :wub:


They may even make a White House baby if he wins the presidency. How cute would that be! :blush:

China
01-08-2008, 02:42 PM
^^^OK, I had the same thought at work today (an Obama White House baby LOL). Michele is probably like Hayell no.LOL

Serbbral
01-09-2008, 01:18 PM
They were talking about almost the exact same thing on the News this morning or was it yesterday morning about John McCain and his wife. Sen. McCain stated on CBS Early Morning News that when he told his wife and daughter that he was going to run again (&#39;08) at the kitchen table, the room got VERY quiet. Ms. McCain precisely told her husband that she did not want to go through this campaigne thing again and if I were a wife, I could totally see her point. So, it&#39;s not just Obama. I can see why this would put a lot of wear and tear on the wife and the family (his daughter/children). The daughter was not happy about his decision either. HE is not only the one running around from state to state; SHE is also. This maybe &#39;interesting&#39; for us but I know it is VERY tiring for not only him, but his family. They go through a LOT and if victory is not met, I can see why, NOT AGAIN. On a lesser note, and I hope I don&#39;t offend anyone here, but this is the same reason why I have always stated that I cannot see myself married to a preacher. Sorry, but it would be too much work and too much involvement with church folk and others.