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View Full Version : If Your Candidate(s) Loses The Nomination, Would You Still Vote Just To See Your Party In Office?



gigglezk
01-13-2008, 08:55 PM
This has been bothering me for sometime. I'm not talking specifically about anyone here or even on this board. It's just that I've seen these comments "I don't like Hilary, but if she gets the nomination I'll vote for her just because I want a democrat in office" and "I hate Romney, but if he gets the vote, I'll vote for him." I just don't understand these comments I really don't. I'm not being bitter or spiteful. I just simply will not vote if my candidates don't get the nomination.

There is no in-between for me. I will not vote for someone just because they are a democrat or a republican. I need to believe in them and respect and be on board with their views. Now, I'm not 100% on board with anyone's views. But there are 2 that I closely align with and that works for me. However, a thing I really take into consideration is how they run their campaign. The dirtier the campaign is run, the filthier the white house will be. Before someone says "but our ancestors fought for our right to vote", yes they did. They fought for our right to do so. And, in this case I will kindly exercise my right not to vote. So please share with me your reasoning behind this. I have asked this question on two other sites and I'm curious to the responses. In the event that neither of my candidates win the bid, I hope they will run independent.

But I will not vote at all, even if my candidates are on Hilary's ticket. This would just make me lose respect for them. I know the if you can't beat them, join them stuff. But, where is your morals if you do this?

GalaxyGirl2012
01-14-2008, 07:26 AM
well i did something like this in the last election because it wasn't about who i wanted to win but who didn't want to win(bush). honestly a sack or potatoes could have run against bush in 2004 and i would have voted for the spuds

this year if i dont like the pres candidates left then i'll just write in someone - Anais you're over 35 and born in the 50 states right? :D

napturallyme
01-14-2008, 08:37 AM
I will vote for whatever Democrat wins the nomination, if Obama does not win. I think it's better for me to vote then not vote at all. I also am a believer in voting because our ancestors could not vote before and that's a slap in their face to me, jmo.

anabwi
01-14-2008, 08:48 AM
I'm an Independent, but I'm going to be voting regardless. I just don't want my late uncle slapping me upside the head from heaven; "gurl, I done walked many miles and got spit on by many a YT folk for you to have the right to vote, so git." :lol:

gigglezk
01-14-2008, 09:07 AM
Alright, now that brings up another question. Do you feel obligated to vote because of our ancestors? I don't. My opinion is they fought for our right to vote, not our obligation to vote. Which I interpret as our right to choose whether or not we want to vote. For those of you have said you will vote regardless, that's awesome. But, my mind is set unless some other candidate really sparks me, but as for now I don't see that happening.

LBellatrix
01-14-2008, 10:07 AM
True, gigglezk, you aren't obligated to vote, but somebody's going to be sitting in that Oval Office regardless of whether you vote.

As I see it, the problem is with the election process itself. It's discouraged a lot of people from participating, regardless of race. Until and unless Americans reclaim and redefine the process in a decisive way, we'll continue to see this disaffection. Unfortunately too many Americans are beat down by "the system"...and in this case I'm using the term to mean a variety of institutions, many of which are supported by a value system that I'm going to describe, for better or worse, as "corporate." Opting out of the election is EXACTLY what these guys want you to do.

Yes, I will vote, because yes, I do feel an obligation to my ancestors to vote. I will vote for the candidate who most closely represents my wishes and needs, knowing that unless I run MYSELF, there's NOBODY out there who can represent me 100 percent. I know that the president is at the top of a political pyramid but I can still affect what happens in that pyramid by paying close attention to the offices that I can see and touch: namely, my local officials, my congressman, and my senators. I try my best to pay attention to who's in those offices and what they're doing. I am a realist in the sense that I am only one person in this vast population BUT I also believe that strength comes in numbers and that America is only as democratic as we the (politically conscious and politically attentive) people make it. Here's the challenge: Can the people take back the election process (and the country itself) from the corporate interests? (Hey...I'm starting to sound like Edwards...)

gigglezk
01-14-2008, 10:35 AM
^^^hey Lbell (and this is NOT to take away from anyone else's answer) so far I like your post the best. Out of all the other boards I've posted this on. Very informative and with that said...I don't feel obligated to vote and really feel like I'm not going to, however like I said before my mind may change. Besides, we have about 9 1/2 months to go. So who knows.

Interesting thoughts, ladies. Thanks for sharing and I hope to hear more. :)

carboncopysue
01-14-2008, 10:45 AM
If my candidate loses the primaries, then I would see who the best candidate is from whoever is left. The last election, I was like GalaxyGirl: I would vote for whomever except Bush. But this time, it’s a clean slate and I would look at each candidate’s records individually to determine who is more aligned with my beliefs.

Sue.

marissasensei
01-14-2008, 12:09 PM
What Lbell said. :yes:

Apart from that, I'll show up to vote against the Republican candidate because the party's eagerness to kowtow to evangelicals scares me, and I'm worried about how this will play out with the Supreme Court, esp. given this current trend of Republican presidents appointing young justices to the court. With some of the more liberal justices getting up there in age (Stevens, Ginsburg, etc.), I am terrified by the (very real, IMO) possibility that they will be replaced by young, uber-conservative justices who will continue what Scalia, et. al have already started in terms of dismantling Roe and Brown. It's bad enough that we'll have to deal with Roberts, Thomas, and Alito another 20-30 years (assuming normal life expectancies); I am downright sick at the thought of what kind of damage that crew would do if they had a consistent majority.

anabwi
01-14-2008, 12:14 PM
To chime in on LBella, there is definitely a problem with the election process, are the votes counted? Early voting started in my county today, and the official start date is 1/29/08. Already on noon news, there were problems at a few polling places, especially taking an hour to vote. With the problems FL had last election, who knows if the votes will count?

But yes, I'm still going to vote because of ancestral obligation.

aquababie19
01-14-2008, 01:04 PM
i vote each and every chance i get. i'm with lbell on this one. the process is so messed up, they want us to simply walk away. complaining does nothing. if my candidate does not make it, i have a second choice. i have read on all the candidates and while i make have to swallow what i really want. i think i lose out by not voting at all. at least i have my say.

China
01-14-2008, 02:28 PM
What Lbell said. :yes:

Apart from that, I'll show up to vote against the Republican candidate because the party's eagerness to kowtow to evangelicals scares me, and I'm worried about how this will play out with the Supreme Court, esp. given this current trend of Republican presidents appointing young justices to the court. With some of the more liberal justices getting up there in age (Stevens, Ginsburg, etc.), I am terrified by the (very real, IMO) possibility that they will be replaced by young, uber-conservative justices who will continue what Scalia, et. al have already started in terms of dismantling Roe and Brown. It's bad enough that we'll have to deal with Roberts, Thomas, and Alito another 20-30 years (assuming normal life expectancies); I am downright sick at the thought of what kind of damage that crew would do if they had a consistent majority.
[/b]

This is also one of the main reasons I will vote regardless. I am REALLY uncomfortable with the direction the Supreme Court is going. I also believe that the war will continue to go on indefinitely with a Republican in office.

GalaxyGirl2012
01-14-2008, 03:54 PM
Alright, now that brings up another question. Do you feel obligated to vote because of our ancestors? I don't. My opinion is they fought for our right to vote, not our obligation to vote. Which I interpret as our right to choose whether or not we want to vote. For those of you have said you will vote regardless, that's awesome. But, my mind is set unless some other candidate really sparks me, but as for now I don't see that happening.
[/b]

nope. i think our ancestors struggled for the right for us to have the choice to vote not struggled so that we are forced to vote. i feel we as a nation need to extend the struggle further so that there is an expansion of the 2 party system especially there's very little practical difference between the dems and the repubs. both parties have the same special interests and take the same contributions from the same mega corporations.

also the whole voting thing is a sham, we've all seen in our lifetimes that a candidate can win the popular vote but lose the election. i cant believe more people still arent up in arms over that.

for this coming election i get the feeling that i'm going to have to vote based on my big 3 issues of war, economy and health care. i'm almost certain that who's ever left i'll only agree with 2 out of 3 of those things and will have to decide which ones are most important.

i&#39;m feeling cynical i need to go watch the wiz or something <_<

napturallyme
01-14-2008, 05:17 PM
also the whole voting thing is a sham, we&#39;ve all seen in our lifetimes that a candidate can win the popular vote but lose the election. i cant believe more people still arent up in arms over that.
[/b]


I heard on the news today that one state (I think New Jersey) passed legislation to give their electoral votes to the national popular vote. They said several other states, including my state (IL) have legislation bills on the floor to do this.



I dunno I&#39;m finding a bit disturbing not to vote because your candidate of choice doesn&#39;t win. If this is the case, there would be a lot of times where I wouldn&#39;t vote because sometimes I don&#39;t even like any of the candidates in my state elections. I rather choose the one of the two who would do a better job then to not have a voice at all. A voting process can&#39;t even change if you don&#39;t vote. The people who make up the laws and change how voting is done have to be voted in. Also I may not agree with a candidate on every issue, but there usually is a few issues I can agree with the candidate on. So, at least I can get a voice on those issues.

GalaxyGirl2012
01-15-2008, 08:20 AM
I heard on the news today that one state (I think New Jersey) passed legislation to give their electoral votes to the national popular vote. They said several other states, including my state (IL) have legislation bills on the floor to do this.
I dunno I&#39;m finding a bit disturbing not to vote because your candidate of choice doesn&#39;t win. If this is the case, there would be a lot of times where I wouldn&#39;t vote because sometimes I don&#39;t even like any of the candidates in my state elections. I rather choose the one of the two who would do a better job then to not have a voice at all. A voting process can&#39;t even change if you don&#39;t vote. The people who make up the laws and change how voting is done have to be voted in. Also I may not agree with a candidate on every issue, but there usually is a few issues I can agree with the candidate on. So, at least I can get a voice on those issues.
[/b]
if they gave the votes based on public vote then that would be great. it seems that most times the votes are the same, but there are other times when they aren&#39;t and that just isn&#39;t fair :(

ive voted in every election since i&#39;ve been 18. if say the horror of horrors happened and it was down to guiliani/clinton or romney clinton. i wouldnt&#39; vote for either because i don&#39;t that much difference between them. i&#39;d focus my efforts and energy on the state level and hoping that whomever is elected senate or representation would serve as an excellent check to either one who one the big house.

napturallyme
01-15-2008, 08:28 AM
My state govt is so f&#39;d up right now that my only hope is the federal govt. elections. In my next state election, I will not vote for anyone who served this last term they can&#39;t get business done because their egos are too big. I will vote for a Republican before I vote for the current governor again (Democrat). My job stability is in the hands of my state govt. and I ain&#39;t likin&#39; it. :Angry:

sunschild57
01-15-2008, 01:18 PM
hmm. If Sen Obama wins the dem bid, will Sen Clinton vote for him? Would Sen Obama vote for Sen Clinton? I think the answer to both questions is yes. You vote for the person who best represents your beliefs. There is no way I would not vote.

chronicity
01-19-2008, 04:02 PM
I don&#39;t get the not voting thing either. Forget about ancestors and stuff (which always is in the back of my mind), but it makes no rational sense to abstain.

I support Obama, but if Clinton is the nominee, she&#39;ll get my vote because her stance on issues is the not that different from Obama&#39;s. Why would I chance having someone in the White House who doesn&#39;t share any of my views just because I don&#39;t want to vote for someone who shares most of them but is not Obama?

Not voting is a vote. It&#39;s a vote for the side that is relying on voter apathy to keep the status quo (i.e. the Republicans). Ask yourself why racist white folks tried to keep black from voting back in the day. It wasn&#39;t just for kicks: It was because they didn&#39;t want to lose power. So yeah, our ancestors fought for the right for us to vote. But it was for a reason.

gigglezk
01-19-2008, 04:23 PM
Originally posted by galaxy girl
i&#39;d focus my efforts and energy on the state level and hoping that whomever is elected senate or representation would serve as an excellent check to either one who one the big house.

I have to agree with this.

So another question for those of you who vote regardless just to have your party in office. What about those who vote just to vote without any real thinking behind it? I&#39;m talking about people who vote for someone just because they are a certain gender, race, religion, or just like that person&#39;s outfit? For example and this is a true story, my MIL voted for Bush because she felt he was more religious than Kerry. :huh: (Yes, I know). So how do you feel about people who waste votes based on superficial (I think that&#39;s the right word) things.


chronicity, you know they do share several similar ideas. However, I can&#39;t in good faith change my mind about voting for Hilary. I believe she is a wolf in sheep&#39;s clothing who is riding the coat tails of her husband. She never says what she means, she pulls things out of thin air, she won&#39;t release important information to back up her experience claims, she claims to love black people so much yet she opposed the civil rights act of 64. There is so much about her that I can&#39;t get on board with. I can&#39;t get on board with someone just because she has a few of the same ideas because I don&#39;t she has what&#39;s best for Americans at heart. Do I really want to chance having someone in office who doesn&#39;t share any of my views? That is something I think almost every day. So that is why I still am open on whether or not I will vote if my candidates don&#39;t make it. However, as with Galaxy I can do my best and support my officials at the state level to represent my views.

chronicity
01-19-2008, 04:49 PM
So another question for those of you who vote regardless just to have your party in office. What about those who vote just to vote without any real thinking behind it? [/b]

Voting for someone for superficial reasons is not something to be proud of. I don&#39;t think it&#39;s good to go into the polling booth uninformed and ignorant. People should place substance above stylings. I think most people who strongly identify with one political party can not evaluate candidates without being unfairly biased. But that&#39;s not to say that it takes a biased person to vote just to have for their party in office. These days there&#39;s enough difference between the parties that it makes sense to vote that way.


chronicity, you know they do share several similar ideas. However, I can&#39;t in good faith change my mind about voting for Hilary. I believe she is a wolf in sheep&#39;s clothing who is riding the coat tails of her husband. She never says what she means, she pulls things out of thin air, she won&#39;t release important information to back up her experience claims, she claims to love black people so much yet she opposed the civil rights act of 64.[/b]

And you think the person she&#39;ll be running against is going to be any better? The Republicans don&#39;t even make a pretense of liking black folks. Just about all of them skipped out on the debate at Morgan State for mysterious, mysterious reasons. And I have no reason to believe McCain, Guilian et al, will be any more forthcoming with information than Bush was. Don&#39;t even get me started on civil liberities. I shudder to think what Guiliani will try to do with those. And Huckabee? Really don&#39;t get me started on him.

You not voting for her translates into a vote for whoever the GOP puts forth. Before you decide to give up your vote, make sure you&#39;re not going to help someone who is even worse than Hillary win. Because you really won&#39;t be in any moral position to complain about it.

gigglezk
01-19-2008, 05:07 PM
My thoughts are still open to voting I&#39;m holding out hope that my candidates get smart and run Independent. I&#39;m a firm believer in "if you don&#39;t vote, don&#39;t complain" so if I choose not to vote then I will hold my tongue. Which is why I&#39;ll go for someone on the state level to make sure my voice is still heard in Washington.

Overall, good posts. Everyone is making me think and then think again. The other boards I posted on are just blah so to speak. There are no thought provoking posts which is why I love NP. You can&#39;t get any better. :)

Aje_Templar
01-19-2008, 06:15 PM
First off, I have been an independent voter since I was 18 years old. I have never pledged any loyalties to any political party.

With that being said, I would not vote for any of the Republican candidates, and I will not vote for Hitlery KKKlinton. If Hitlery wins, then I am going to vote for Cynthia McKinney in the Green party for no other reason but to send a message to the DNC, and I hope that other Black voters will support some 3rd party candidate as well.

Regardless of what happens, this election has shown that the black electorate needs to scrap the Congressional Jigaboo Caucus and replace it with a REAL Congressional Black Caucus that contains Black politicians that actually have some spine. This election has shown that most of them are on the payroll of the KKKlinton-Bush crime family and will only work to serve their own self interests.


Aje

tangytic
01-20-2008, 05:58 PM
Great question and one I have been wrestling with. The answer in my case is yes.