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CoCo2000
02-14-2008, 06:25 PM
Black Lawmakers Rethink Clinton Support (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080215/ap_on_el_pr/clinton_superdelegates)

Black lawmakers rethink Clinton support By DAVID ESPO, AP Special Correspondent
56 minutes ago


In a fresh sign of trouble for Hillary Rodham Clinton, one of the former first lady's congressional black supporters intends to vote for Barack Obama at the Democratic National Convention, and a second, more prominent lawmaker is openly discussing a possible switch.

Rep. David Scott's defection and Rep. John Lewis' remarks highlight one of the challenges confronting Clinton in a campaign that pits a black man against a woman for a nomination that historically has been the exclusive property of white men.

"You've got to represent the wishes of your constituency," Scott said in an interview Wednesday in the Capitol. "My proper position would be to vote the wishes of my constituents." The third-term lawmaker represents a district that gave more than 80 percent of its vote to Obama in the Feb. 5 Georgia primary.

Lewis, whose Atlanta-area district voted 3-to-1 for Obama, said he is not ready to abandon his backing for the former first lady. But several associates said the nationally known civil rights figure has become increasingly torn about his early endorsement of Clinton. They spoke on condition of anonymity, citing private conversations.

In an interview, Lewis likened Obama to Robert F. Kennedy in his ability to generate campaign excitement, and left open the possibility he might swing behind the Illinois senator. "It could (happen). There's no question about it. It could happen with a lot of people ... we can count and we see the clock," he said.

Clinton's recent string of eight primary and caucus defeats coincides with an evident shift in momentum in the contest for support from party officials who will attend the convention. The former first lady still holds a sizable lead among the roughly 800 so-called superdelegates, who are chosen outside the primary and caucus system.

But Christine Samuels, until this week a Clinton superdelegate from New Jersey, said during the day she is now supporting Obama.

Two other superdelegates, Sophie Masloff of Pennsylvania and Nancy Larson of Minnesota, are uncommitted, having dropped their earlier endorsements of Clinton.

On Wednesday, David Wilhelm, a longtime ally of the Clintons who had been neutral in the presidential race, endorsed Obama.

The comments by Scott and Lewis reflect pressure on Clinton's black supporters, particularly elected officials, not to stand in the way of what is plainly the best chance in history to have an African-American president.

"Nobody could see this" in advance, Rep. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina, the highest-ranking black in Congress, said of Obama's emergence. He is officially neutral in the race, but expressed his irritation earlier in the year with remarks that Clinton and her husband the former president had made about civil rights history.

One black supporter of Clinton, Rep. Emanuel Cleaver of Missouri, said he remains committed to her. "There's nothing going on right now that would cause me to" change, he said.

He said any suggestion that elected leaders should follow their voters "raises the age old political question. Are we elected to monitor where our constituents are ... or are we to use our best judgment to do what's in the best interests of our constituents."

In an interview, Cleaver offered a glimpse of private conversations.

He said Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. of Illinois had recently asked him "if it comes down to the last day and you're the only superdelegate? ... Do you want to go down in history as the one to prevent a black from winning the White House?

"I told him I'd think about it," Cleaver concluded.

Jackson, an Obama supporter, confirmed the conversation, and said the dilemma may pose a career risk for some black politicians. "Many of these guys have offered their support to Mrs. Clinton, but Obama has won their districts. So you wake up without the carpet under your feet. You might find some young primary challenger placing you in a difficult position" in the future, he added.

Obama and Clinton are in a competitive race for convention delegates. Overall, he has 1,276 in The Associated Press count, and she has 1,220. It takes 2,025 to clinch the nomination.

But the overall totals mask two distinct trends.

Obama has won 1,112 delegates in primaries and caucuses, and Clinton has won 979 in the same contests in the AP count.

The former first lady leads in the superdelegate chase, 241-164.

Not surprisingly, two sides differ on the proper role of the superdelegates.

"My strong belief is that if we end up with the most states and the most pledged delegates, and the most voters in the country, then it would be problematic for political insiders to overturn the judgment of the voters," Obama said recently.

But Clinton said superdelegates should make up their own minds. She noted pointedly that Massachusetts Sens. John Kerry and Edward Kennedy have both endorsed Obama, yet she won the state handily on Feb. 5.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California, who is neutral in the race, said she hopes one or the other of the rivals emerges as the clear winner through the primaries and caucuses.

"I don't think it was ever intended that superdelegates would overturn the verdict, the decision of the American people," she said Thursday.

sunschild57
02-14-2008, 06:47 PM
Black Lawmakers Rethink Clinton Support (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080215/ap_on_el_pr/clinton_superdelegates)

"You've got to represent the wishes of your constituency," Scott said in an interview Wednesday in the Capitol. "My proper position would be to vote the wishes of my constituents." The third-term lawmaker represents a district that gave more than 80 percent of its vote to Obama in the Feb. 5 Georgia primary.

He said any suggestion that elected leaders should follow their voters "raises the age old political question. Are we elected to monitor where our constituents are ... or are we to use our best judgment to do what's in the best interests of our constituents."

He said Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. of Illinois had recently asked him "if it comes down to the last day and you're the only superdelegate? ... Do you want to go down in history as the one to prevent a black from winning the White House?

Jackson, an Obama supporter, confirmed the conversation, and said the dilemma may pose a career risk for some black politicians. "Many of these guys have offered their support to Mrs. Clinton, but Obama has won their districts. So you wake up without the carpet under your feet. You might find some young primary challenger placing you in a difficult position" in the future, he added.

"I don't think it was ever intended that superdelegates would overturn the verdict, the decision of the American people," she said Thursday.
[/b]

The above are key points. I think the superdelegates, specfically the elected officials should think long and hard before they cast their vote behind any candidate. In the case of John Lewis and Davis Scott, they must decide if Clinton is worth losing their seat over. Do you represent the people or yourself?

lovinblackness
02-15-2008, 06:19 AM
It seems to me the Democratic party is not looking at the big picture, and as usual, the Republicans are. They are getting ready for the big fight while Democrats are infighting. Hillary may be the better candidate in the opinion of many, for whatever their reasons may be and I can respect that. But can she take the White house against a McCain who is also energizing and mobilizing independents?

Many, myself included, have said they'd either abstain from voting or even vote for McCain over Clinton. Hillary may be able to give Obama a hell of a challenge, but I'm not so sure she can do the same against a McCain. A lot of Americans who might vote for Obama would never vote for Hillary. I don't think these superdelegates are looking at the big picture here and that myopia is what bothers me most about the Democrats.



The above are key points. I think the superdelegates, specfically the elected officials should think long and hard before they cast their vote behind any candidate. In the case of John Lewis and Davis Scott, they must decide if Clinton is worth losing their seat over. Do you represent the people or yourself?
[/b]


Yep. I'm already irritated by the actions of a lot of these folks and they better realize that if Obama loses after they endorsed Clinton a lot of folks, not just Black people, will remember that when election time rolls around. Obama has inspired some very passionate supporters regardless of race, I think he brings out the best in Americans and we need that after the eight years of deepest darkness we and the world have suffered at the hands of the Bushians. People will be PISSED if he doesn't get the nomination and they will want someone to pay.

:unsure: Oh Lord, they got me. I think I've become an Obamatron. :huh:

napturallyme
02-15-2008, 06:38 AM
I think the superdelegates should listen to their constituents and give their delegates to who won in their area. To go against what the people have voted for does not sit well with me.


IA that they need to look at the big picture. I don't see Clinton beating McCain.

CoCo2000
02-15-2008, 07:00 AM
In the case of John Lewis and Davis Scott, they must decide if Clinton is worth losing their seat over. Do you represent the people or yourself?
[/b]
ITA, especially with the bolded part. We know, in theory, they are supposed to be representing the people who elected them, but more often than not, members of congress are representing their own best interests.

I had never heard of a superdelegate until a few weeks ago and when I found out what their role is supposed to be, I had serious issues with the fact that they could decide who the nominee will be, even if the primary/caucus voters decided otherwise. Not a very democratic process at all. <_<

curlycoilyfroily
02-15-2008, 07:20 AM
It&#39;s official from Lewis! Update from NYT (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/15/us/politics/15clinton.html?em&ex=1203224400&en=f5d529f0614b976a&ei=5087%0A)

February 15, 2008
Black Leader, a Clinton Ally, Tilts to Obama
By JEFF ZELENY and PATRICK HEALY

MILWAUKEE — Representative John Lewis, an elder statesman from the civil rights era and one of Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton’s most prominent black supporters, said Thursday night that he planned to cast his vote as a superdelegate for Senator Barack Obama in hopes of preventing a fight at the Democratic convention.

“In recent days, there is a sense of movement and a sense of spirit,” said Mr. Lewis, a Georgia Democrat who endorsed Mrs. Clinton last fall. “Something is happening in America, and people are prepared and ready to make that great leap.”

Mr. Lewis, who carries great influence among other members of Congress, disclosed his decision in an interview in which he said that as a superdelegate he could “never, ever do anything to reverse the action” of the voters of his district, who overwhelmingly supported Mr. Obama.

“I’ve been very impressed with the campaign of Senator Obama,” Mr. Lewis said. “He’s getting better and better every single day.”

His comments came as fresh signs emerged that Mrs. Clinton’s support was beginning to erode from some other African-American lawmakers who also serve as superdelegates. Representative David Scott of Georgia, who was among the first to defect, said he, too, would not go against the will of voters in his district.

The developments came on a day in which Mrs. Clinton set out anew to prove that the fight for the Democratic nomination was far from over. Campaigning in Ohio, she pursued a new strategy of biting attack lines against Mr. Obama, while adopting a newly populist tone as she courted blue-collar voters.

Mrs. Clinton also intensified her efforts in Wisconsin, which holds its primary on Tuesday and where she and Mr. Obama now have the first dueling negative television advertisements of the campaign.

In the ads, Mrs. Clinton taunted Mr. Obama for refusing to debate her in Wisconsin. And she and former President Bill Clinton prepared for a new fund-raising blitz to try to counter Mr. Obama’s edge of several million dollars in campaign cash.

Yet even as the Democratic rivals looked ahead to the primaries in Wisconsin, Ohio and Texas, Mr. Lewis said he and other prominent African-American party leaders had been moved by Mr. Obama’s recent victories and his ability to transcend racial and geographic lines.

Though Mr. Lewis had praise for Mrs. Clinton and for her historic candidacy, he said he could decide within days whether to formally endorse Mr. Obama.

He also said he and other lawmakers would meet in the coming days to decide how they intended to weigh in on the nominating fight. If neither Mrs. Clinton nor Mr. Obama receive enough pledged delegates to win the nomination, superdelegates like Mr. Lewis may play the deciding role in who wins.

“If I can be used as a mediator, a negotiator or a peacemaker, I’d be happy to step in,” Mr. Lewis said, adding that he intends to speak to both candidates in hopes of ending the race amicably in the next month. “I don’t want to see Mrs. Clinton damaged or Mr. Obama damaged.”

Jay Carson, a spokesman for Mrs. Clinton, said Thursday: “Congressman Lewis is a true American hero, and we have the utmost respect for him and understand the great pressure he faced. And Senator Clinton enjoys incredibly strong support from superdelegates around the country from all regions and races.”

The comments by Mr. Lewis underscored a growing sentiment among some of the party’s black leaders that they should not stand in the way of Mr. Obama’s historic quest for the nomination and should not go against the will of their constituents. As superdelegates, they may have the final say, which is something Mr. Lewis said he feared would weaken Democrats and raise Republicans’ chances of winning the White House.

Still, the Democratic nominating fight clearly has many turns ahead. On Thursday, Mrs. Clinton unleashed the most ambitious mobilization of her forces in weeks, reflecting the intense pressure she is under from Mr. Obama, the political necessity for her of towering performances in the delegate-rich primaries in Ohio and Texas on March 4, and her fresh hope of an upset victory in Wisconsin.

Specifically, Mrs. Clinton is hoping to gain political mileage by turning one of Mr. Obama’s attributes, his oratory, against him. She is warning voters about politicians who give great speeches and make big promises but ultimately do not deliver on them.

“Speeches don’t put food on the table,” Mrs. Clinton said at a General Motors plant in Warren, Ohio, on Thursday morning. “Speeches don’t fill up your tank, or fill your prescription, or do anything about that stack of bills that keeps you up at night.”

“My opponent gives speeches,” she added. “I offer solutions.”

Mrs. Clinton has been also criticizing Mr. Obama with populist language, saying she would “take on” insurers and credit card companies and “go after” drug companies. She portrayed Mr. Obama as untested on the battlefield against special interests.

If there was a sign of the imbalance in momentum between Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Obama on Thursday, it could be gleaned from Mr. Obama’s travel itinerary. He took a respite from the campaign trail, aides said, so he could spend Valentine’s Day with his family in Chicago before returning to Wisconsin on Friday.

Clinton advisers said Thursday that it was unlikely they would broadcast “horrible nasty negative ads,” in the words of one adviser, and that they were wary of going too negative against Mr. Obama, given what the Clintons say is the news media’s tendency to coddle and protect Mr. Obama and portray the Clintons as an attack machine.

At the same time, Clinton advisers say that the stakes are so high — in Ohio and Texas in particular — that Mrs. Clinton cannot afford to let Mr. Obama gain momentum. In Wisconsin, for instance, Mrs. Clinton is hoping to stave off a blowout — and perhaps even pull off a surprise — by blasting Mr. Obama for refusing to debate her there.

“The last time we debated was in California, and I convincingly won California, which may be why Senator Obama doesn’t want to have a debate in Wisconsin,” Mrs. Clinton said in a telephone conference call with reporters.

Mr. Carson, her spokesman, said she would keep the debate issue alive until Tuesday.

“A refusal to debate one’s primary opponent is always seen by regular voters as being chicken,” he said. “And voters, especially Democratic voters hungry for a general election win, want a candidate who is tough and ready.”

Mr. Obama responded to the attacks with a television spot of his own in Wisconsin.

“After 18 debates, with two more coming, Hillary says Barack Obama is ducking debates?” the advertisement says, showing images from their debates over the last year. “It’s the same old politics, of phony charges and false attacks.”

As Mrs. Clinton was delivering her criticism of Mr. Obama in Ohio, a similar argument was presented to Wisconsin voters by Mr. Clinton, who referred to Mr. Obama as “the excitement of the now.”

“It’s about whether you choose the power of solutions over the power of speeches,” Mr. Clinton told a small gathering of voters in Milwaukee, ticking through a list of his wife’s platforms and accomplishments.

In New Mexico, one of the more than 20 states to hold contests on Feb. 5, the votes were finally counted Thursday, giving Mrs. Clinton a victory and providing more evidence that the contest was far from concluded. She continued to hold a lead among superdelegates, even as a New Jersey official, Christine Samuels, changed her support to Mr. Obama and at least two others went back to being uncommitted.

gigglezk
02-15-2008, 07:28 AM
It seems to me the Democratic party is not looking at the big picture, and as usual, the Republicans are. They are getting ready for the big fight while Democrats are infighting. Hillary may be the better candidate in the opinion of many, for whatever their reasons may be and I can respect that. But can she take the White house against a McCain who is also energizing and mobilizing independents?
[/b]

ITA with this. And, I&#39;m not just saying this because I&#39;m for Obama. Political strategists are saying the same thing. Hillary cannot beat McCain. John King (CNN) when asked what does John McCain need to be the next president said in a 100% straight face "for Hillary to be the Democratic nominee". And there it is. The panel was quiet for a moment, but pretty much agreed. A lot of people don&#39;t like McCain. They say he is too liberal. But they absolutely hate Hillary. I mean they absolutely abhor her. And would rather vote for McCain than Hillary. And I can definitely see this happening. I can even see myself voting for McCain and that scares me. But seeing Hillary in the white house scares me even more. Mehogeni, I think, posted a lot of information about Hillary in another thread that really woke me up. Also stuff I&#39;ve read on my own about her makes me really concerned. Especially since she was against the 1964 Civil Rights Act, yet she loves the black man. And she keeps making up these stories about being a young girl working for democrats, heffa please! you were a republican! But anyway, back on topic.

Hillary cannot carry the democrats back into the white house. Can Obama? I believe he has a damn good chance much more better than Hillary. The Republicans have been preparing for a fight with Hillary for the last 4 years, they got that on lock down. I think it will be a huge slap in the face, I mean the kind of slap that makes your neck jerk back and your cheek burn for days, if the superdelegates go against the people. I think Obama is looking at the big picture and Hillary is looking at the big picture for her political career. Her azz has been baked, yet she continues to press on. I think she wants it to go to the DNC and cause an uproar.

CoCo2000
02-15-2008, 08:21 AM
Mehogeni, I think, posted a lot of information about Hillary in another thread that really woke me up. Also stuff I&#39;ve read on my own about her makes me really concerned. Especially since she was against the 1964 Civil Rights Act[/b]
gigglezk or mehogeni, please post a link to the thread with the information mentioned above. I would like to share the information with a friend whom I&#39;ve been asking for YEARS, "Why is it that you think Bill Clinton (and &#39;em) love your people?

Chyna Black
02-15-2008, 09:01 AM
I had never heard of a superdelegate until a few weeks ago and when I found out what their role is supposed to be, I had serious issues with the fact that they could decide who the nominee will be, even if the primary/caucus voters decided otherwise. Not a very democratic process at all. <_<
[/b]


That&#39;s me also. Keep it simple and let the votes decide.

@ lovinblackness its like they are the body snatchers or somthing these Obamatons are strong..... :lol: :lol:

mehogeni
02-15-2008, 09:29 AM
gigglezk or mehogeni, please post a link to the thread with the information mentioned above. I would like to share the information with a friend whom I&#39;ve been asking for YEARS, "Why is it that you think Bill Clinton (and &#39;em) love your people?
[/b]

awww thanks Gigglez for that, I&#39;m glad my information reached out to someone....I just get sick and tired of how the media(even our own) blinds us to some basis facts about HIllary(some quotes she literally stated in her biography) yet makes it seem like she&#39;s some longtime progressive white liberal democratic womanist with a fro who has given us black people the moon and then some and that we owe Billary another presidency cause of her failures and wedding ring..oopS i meant "experience":rolleyes:


http://www.nappturality.com/forum/index.ph...c=105864&st=120 (http://www.nappturality.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=105864&st=120)

I posted my info on the 7th page I believe?

MsSankofa
02-15-2008, 12:25 PM
^^^^ :clap: @ Mehongeni for breaking Billary down to her lowest common denominator in that old post.

I&#39;m an NP lurker and an Obama supporter now living in Southern CA, but born and reared on Chicago&#39;s South Side. I have been sick with the flu, so I&#39;ve spent some time this week following Barack&#39;s progress, watching CNN, and surfing the internet. I came across this article on TheRoot.com. It presents an interesting point of view of why many black women of all ages just can&#39;t flow with Billary.


Hillary&#39;s Scarlett O&#39;Hara Act (http://www.theroot.com/id/44696)


Hillary&#39;s Scarlett O&#39;Hara Act
Why some of us aren&#39;t falling for it.
By Melissa Harris-Lacewell
TheRoot.com
Updated: 6:56 PM ET Feb 7, 2008
Feb. 8, 2008--There&#39;s been a lot of talk about women and their choices since Super Tuesday, when African American women overwhelmingly voted for Sen. Barack Obama, while white women picked Sen. Hillary Clinton. Some pundits automatically concluded that "race trumped gender" among black women. I hate this analysis because it relegates black women to junior-partner status in political struggles. It is not that simple. A lot of people have tried to gently explain the divide, so I&#39;m just going to put this out there: Sister voters have a beef with white women like Clinton that is both racial and gendered. It is not about choosing race; it is about rejecting Hillary&#39;s Scarlett O&#39;Hara act.

Black women voters are rejecting Hillary Clinton because her ascendance is not a liberating symbol. Her tears are not moving. Her voice does not resonate. Throughout history, privileged white women, attached at the hip to their husband&#39;s power and influence, have been complicit in black women&#39;s oppression. Many African American women are simply refusing to play Mammy to Hillary.

The loyal Mammy figure, who toiled in the homes of white people, nursing their babies and cleaning and cooking their food, is the most enduring and dishonest representation of black women. She is a uniquely American icon who first emerged as our young country was trying to put itself back together after the Civil War. The romanticism about this period is a bizarre historical anomaly that underscores America&#39;s deep racism: The defeated traitors of the Confederacy have been allowed to reinterpret the war&#39;s battles, fly the flag of secession over state houses, and raise monuments to those who fought to tear down the country. Southern white secessionists were given the power to rewrite history even as America&#39;s newest citizens were relegated to forced agricultural peonage, grinding urban poverty and new forms segregation and racial terror.

Mammy was a central figure in this mythmaking and she was perfect for the role. The Mammy myth allowed Americans in the North and South to ignore the brutality of slavery by claiming that black women were tied to white families through genuine bonds of affection. Mammy justified past enslavement and continuing oppression.

Privileged, Southern white women were central in creating and propagating the Mammy myth. In 1923, the United Daughters of the Confederacy were nearly successful in lobbying Congress to erect a statue on federal land to honor "the memory of the faithful colored mammies of the South." The desire to memorialize Mammy reveals how Southern white women reveled in the subordinate role of their darker peers. These black women were vulnerable to the sexual and labor exploitation of slaveholders and household employers. These women masked their true thoughts and personalities in order to gain a modicum of security for themselves and their families. The Mammy monument was meant to display black women as the faithful, feisty, loyal servants of white domesticity.

In the face of the Mammy myth, real black women spoke for themselves against the monument. It was substantial, sustained opposition from organized African American women and the black press that killed the Mammy monument proposal.

Media have cast the choice in the current election as a simple binary between race and gender. But those who claim that black women are ignoring gender issues by voting for Barack just don&#39;t get it. Hillary cannot have black women&#39;s allegiance for free. Black women will not be relegated to the status of supportive Mammy, easing the way for privileged white women to enter the halls of power.

Black feminist politics is not simple identity politics. It is not about letting brothers handle the race stuff, or about letting white women dominate the gender stuff. The black woman&#39;s fight is on all fronts. Sisters resist the ways that black male leaders try to silence women&#39;s issues and squash female leadership. At the same time, black women challenge white women who want to claim black women&#39;s allegiance without acknowledging the realities of racism. They will not be drawn into any simple allegiance that refuses to account for their full humanity and citizenship.

Black women want out of the war. Black women need health insurance. Black women need decent schools for their children. Black women need a strong economy that creates jobs. Black women need help caring for their aging parents. Black women want a Democratic win in the fall. Sisters chose Barack on Tuesday because they believe he can deliver these things, and that is much more empowering than just having a woman in the White House.

Melissa Harris-Lacewell is is associate professor of politics and African American studies at Princeton University.

curlycoilyfroily
02-15-2008, 01:11 PM
Black women voters are rejecting Hillary Clinton because her ascendance is not a liberating symbol. Her tears are not moving. Her voice does not resonate. Throughout history, privileged white women, attached at the hip to their husband&#39;s power and influence, have been complicit in black women&#39;s oppression. Many African American women are simply refusing to play Mammy to Hillary.

...


Media have cast the choice in the current election as a simple binary between race and gender. But those who claim that black women are ignoring gender issues by voting for Barack just don&#39;t get it. Hillary cannot have black women&#39;s allegiance for free. Black women will not be relegated to the status of supportive Mammy, easing the way for privileged white women to enter the halls of power.

Black feminist politics is not simple identity politics. It is not about letting brothers handle the race stuff, or about letting white women dominate the gender stuff. The black woman&#39;s fight is on all fronts. Sisters resist the ways that black male leaders try to silence women&#39;s issues and squash female leadership. At the same time, black women challenge white women who want to claim black women&#39;s allegiance without acknowledging the realities of racism. They will not be drawn into any simple allegiance that refuses to account for their full humanity and citizenship.
[/b]

Wow. She blew me away with the mammy metaphor. The bolded above is also on point, especially the point about being relegated to a supporting role that requires cheering for white women when the playing field isn&#39;t even close to level. I can&#39;t imagine that when if it came down to a black woman and a white man they&#39;d be falling over themselves to support one of us for the sake of sisterhood. :rolleyes:

gigglezk
02-15-2008, 01:18 PM
Wow. She blew me away with the mammy metaphor. The bolded above is also on point, especially the point about being relegated to a supporting role that requires cheering for white women when the playing field isn&#39;t even close to level. I can&#39;t imagine that when if it came down to a black woman and a white man they&#39;d be falling over themselves to support one of us for the sake of sisterhood. :rolleyes:
[/b]


I know that&#39;s right.

MsSankofa, Thanks for posting that article. It was a very deep metaphor!

sunschild57
02-15-2008, 02:35 PM
John Lewis...a local news station in Atlanta just reported that John Lewis&#39; office said that he has NOT swithched his endorsement from Clinton to Obama.

The local ABC station also said that a 30 year old Atlanta activist will announce that he will be running against Mr Lewis in the next election.

P.S.
Mr Scott&#39;s office said the he is backing Mr Obama. They stated that 80 percent of Mr Scotts district voted for Barack Obama so Mr Scott is going with who the people he represents wants.