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masoesa
02-26-2008, 04:45 AM
http://www.newscloud.com/read/Hillary_s_Scarlett_O_Hara_Act

Feb. 8, 2008--There's been a lot of talk about women and their choices since Super Tuesday, when African American women overwhelmingly voted for Sen. Barack Obama, while white women picked Sen. Hillary Clinton. Some pundits automatically concluded that "race trumped gender" among black women. I hate this analysis because it relegates black women to junior-partner status in political struggles. It is not that simple. A lot of people have tried to gently explain the divide, so I'm just going to put this out there: Sister voters have a beef with white women like Clinton that is both racial and gendered. It is not about choosing race; it is about rejecting Hillary's Scarlett O'Hara act.

Black women voters are rejecting Hillary Clinton because her ascendance is not a liberating symbol. Her tears are not moving. Her voice does not resonate. Throughout history, privileged white women, attached at the hip to their husband's power and influence, have been complicit in black women's oppression. Many African American women are simply refusing to play Mammy to Hillary.

The loyal Mammy figure, who toiled in the homes of white people, nursing their babies and cleaning and cooking their food, is the most enduring and dishonest representation of black women. She is a uniquely American icon who first emerged as our young country was trying to put itself back together after the Civil War. The romanticism about this period is a bizarre historical anomaly that underscores America's deep racism: The defeated traitors of the Confederacy have been allowed to reinterpret the war's battles, fly the flag of secession over state houses, and raise monuments to those who fought to tear down the country. Southern white secessionists were given the power to rewrite history even as America's newest citizens were relegated to forced agricultural peonage, grinding urban poverty and new forms segregation and racial terror.

Mammy was a central figure in this mythmaking and she was perfect for the role. The Mammy myth allowed Americans in the North and South to ignore the brutality of slavery by claiming that black women were tied to white families through genuine bonds of affection. Mammy justified past enslavement and continuing oppression.

Privileged, Southern white women were central in creating and propagating the Mammy myth. In 1923, the United Daughters of the Confederacy were nearly successful in lobbying Congress to erect a statue on federal land to honor "the memory of the faithful colored mammies of the South." The desire to memorialize Mammy reveals how Southern white women reveled in the subordinate role of their darker peers. These black women were vulnerable to the sexual and labor exploitation of slaveholders and household employers. These women masked their true thoughts and personalities in order to gain a modicum of security for themselves and their families. The Mammy monument was meant to display black women as the faithful, feisty, loyal servants of white domesticity.

In the face of the Mammy myth, real black women spoke for themselves against the monument. It was substantial, sustained opposition from organized African American women and the black press that killed the Mammy monument proposal.

Media have cast the choice in the current election as a simple binary between race and gender. But those who claim that black women are ignoring gender issues by voting for Barack just don't get it. Hillary cannot have black women's allegiance for free. Black women will not be relegated to the status of supportive Mammy, easing the way for privileged white women to enter the halls of power.

Black feminist politics is not simple identity politics. It is not about letting brothers handle the race stuff, or about letting white women dominate the gender stuff. The black woman's fight is on all fronts. Sisters resist the ways that black male leaders try to silence women's issues and squash female leadership. At the same time, black women challenge white women who want to claim black women's allegiance without acknowledging the realities of racism. They will not be drawn into any simple allegiance that refuses to account for their full humanity and citizenship.

Black women want out of the war. Black women need health insurance. Black women need decent schools for their children. Black women need a strong economy that creates jobs. Black women need help caring for their aging parents. Black women want a Democratic win in the fall. Sisters chose Barack on Tuesday because they believe he can deliver these things, and that is much more empowering than just having a woman in the White House.

Melissa Harris-Lacewell is is associate professor of politics and African American studies at Princeton University.

cyndependant
02-26-2008, 06:27 AM
http://www.newscloud.com/read/Hillary_s_Scarlett_O_Hara_Act

Feb. 8, 2008--There's been a lot of talk about women and their choices since Super Tuesday, when African American women overwhelmingly voted for Sen. Barack Obama, while white women picked Sen. Hillary Clinton. Some pundits automatically concluded that "race trumped gender" among black women. I hate this analysis because it relegates black women to junior-partner status in political struggles. It is not that simple. A lot of people have tried to gently explain the divide, so I'm just going to put this out there: Sister voters have a beef with white women like Clinton that is both racial and gendered. It is not about choosing race; it is about rejecting Hillary's Scarlett O'Hara act.

Black women voters are rejecting Hillary Clinton because her ascendance is not a liberating symbol. Her tears are not moving. Her voice does not resonate. Throughout history, privileged white women, attached at the hip to their husband's power and influence, have been complicit in black women's oppression. Many African American women are simply refusing to play Mammy to Hillary.

The loyal Mammy figure, who toiled in the homes of white people, nursing their babies and cleaning and cooking their food, is the most enduring and dishonest representation of black women. She is a uniquely American icon who first emerged as our young country was trying to put itself back together after the Civil War. The romanticism about this period is a bizarre historical anomaly that underscores America's deep racism: The defeated traitors of the Confederacy have been allowed to reinterpret the war's battles, fly the flag of secession over state houses, and raise monuments to those who fought to tear down the country. Southern white secessionists were given the power to rewrite history even as America's newest citizens were relegated to forced agricultural peonage, grinding urban poverty and new forms segregation and racial terror.

Mammy was a central figure in this mythmaking and she was perfect for the role. The Mammy myth allowed Americans in the North and South to ignore the brutality of slavery by claiming that black women were tied to white families through genuine bonds of affection. Mammy justified past enslavement and continuing oppression.

Privileged, Southern white women were central in creating and propagating the Mammy myth. In 1923, the United Daughters of the Confederacy were nearly successful in lobbying Congress to erect a statue on federal land to honor "the memory of the faithful colored mammies of the South." The desire to memorialize Mammy reveals how Southern white women reveled in the subordinate role of their darker peers. These black women were vulnerable to the sexual and labor exploitation of slaveholders and household employers. These women masked their true thoughts and personalities in order to gain a modicum of security for themselves and their families. The Mammy monument was meant to display black women as the faithful, feisty, loyal servants of white domesticity.

In the face of the Mammy myth, real black women spoke for themselves against the monument. It was substantial, sustained opposition from organized African American women and the black press that killed the Mammy monument proposal.

Media have cast the choice in the current election as a simple binary between race and gender. But those who claim that black women are ignoring gender issues by voting for Barack just don't get it. Hillary cannot have black women's allegiance for free. Black women will not be relegated to the status of supportive Mammy, easing the way for privileged white women to enter the halls of power.

Black feminist politics is not simple identity politics. It is not about letting brothers handle the race stuff, or about letting white women dominate the gender stuff. The black woman's fight is on all fronts. Sisters resist the ways that black male leaders try to silence women's issues and squash female leadership. At the same time, black women challenge white women who want to claim black women's allegiance without acknowledging the realities of racism. They will not be drawn into any simple allegiance that refuses to account for their full humanity and citizenship.

Black women want out of the war. Black women need health insurance. Black women need decent schools for their children. Black women need a strong economy that creates jobs. Black women need help caring for their aging parents. Black women want a Democratic win in the fall. Sisters chose Barack on Tuesday because they believe he can deliver these things, and that is much more empowering than just having a woman in the White House.

Melissa Harris-Lacewell is is associate professor of politics and African American studies at Princeton University.
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And that is the truth for me! I love this whole article. Very well written.

britni
02-26-2008, 06:55 AM
:clap:

Someone needs to forward this to Hillary. <_<

BrnNappyGrl
02-26-2008, 09:06 AM
:clap:

Someone needs to forward this to Hillary. <_<
[/b]

*Copy. Paste. Hit Send*

Real talk!

Chyna Black
02-26-2008, 09:19 AM
The Mammy monument was meant to display black women as the faithful, feisty, loyal servants of white domesticity.

Wow this touches me in a total different way, what an eye opener.

kurliehead
02-26-2008, 12:16 PM
I love this article. It articulates exactly what I feel/think when people try to say I should vote for HillBilly just because we both happen to be women.

curlycoilyfroily
03-07-2008, 10:44 AM
Instead of creating a totally new thread, I thought I&#39;d add this op-ed by Annette John-Hall of the Phila. Inquirer (http://www.philly.com/philly/columnists/20080307_Annette_John-Hall__Black_womens_Clinton_problem.html)here as it expresses a lot of feelings about Hillary and Barack that we&#39;ve discussed here.

Annette John-Hall: Black women&#39;s Clinton problem

By Annette John-Hall

Well, well, maybe being in the kitchen is the place to be.

By throwing the kitchen sink - and then some - at Barack Obama the other night, solutions-not-speeches candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton rose from the dead in power red.

Adoring throngs of women chanting "Yes, she will" cheered their sister on as she vowed to win back the family home. You know, the big White one.

My house was quiet. The kids were sleeping safely. And then my phone rang. I picked it up, after the first ring.

"Every time I look at Hillary, I can&#39;t shake the feeling that she reminds me of all the white women who have ever mistreated me in my life."

That would be my 50-something friend, Tina, calling from Dallas.

Apparently flashing back to some of the white women bosses and coworkers who held the door open for each other - and slammed it on her.

Thirty years later, she is still getting training, working on that make-or-break experience. Like Hillary, 35 years could be her magic number.

Tina cut to the heart of why many black women haven&#39;t overwhelmingly cast their votes in bra-burning solidarity for the "Lifetime of Experience" candidate.

I&#39;ve heard that same resentful sentiment expressed by plenty of other older black women. I guess we&#39;re not the ones they&#39;re talking about when they refer to Hillary&#39;s core base being older women.

Women&#39;s liberation didn&#39;t lift up black women. It helped keep them down.

Picking up the slack
"During the feminist movement of the &#39;60s, white women were saying they deserved to work outside of the home. But their men didn&#39;t pick up the slack at home," notes Melissa Harris-Lacewell, professor of politics and African American studies at Princeton University.

"Black and brown women did."

Truth be told, the blue-collar candidate is anything but.

"Hillary Clinton likes to cast herself as an outsider candidate, but the truth is, she is a woman of privilege who is connected at the hip to the [former] president of the United States," Harris-Lacewell says.

Which means a woman in charge doesn&#39;t necessarily mean women win. My friend Tina could testify to that. Well, me, too. "African American women recognize that as long as politics is old-school run, we will always lose," she says. "The only way we can get a true hearing is to change the way politics is done."

For all of Gloria Steinem&#39;s gripes that gender is the most restrictive force in American life, black women know better.

Black and female come with their own challenges. And then there&#39;s that "third burden," argues economist Julianne Malveaux in the National Urban League&#39;s recently released "The State of Black America 2008" - being connected at the hip to the all-too-demonized black man.

The report once again finds black women the poorest, sickest, least insured, least educated and most likely to get slapped with a foreclosure notice.

So who can fault a vote for hope? But it&#39;s a nasty four-letter word, when Hillary gets on a mocking roll.

Faith in the choir
Yes, many of us did give her the "Oh, no, she didn&#39;t" arched brow when she mocked the celestial-choirs kind of hope that Obama inspires.

"Celestial choirs is what got my grandmother through," Harris-Lacewell says. "It&#39;s what got all of our grandmothers through."

But hope doesn&#39;t necessarily come in a color or gender.

Campaign director Maggie Williams, an African American, answered Hillary&#39;s call for help and righted her house just in time. That doesn&#39;t make her any less black.

And just because Oprah&#39;s an Obama supporter doesn&#39;t mean she&#39;s any less woman.

Comparable policies aside, maybe what it really comes down to is a gut feeling. A father who takes time off the campaign to take his daughters trick-or-treating, as Obama did, resonates as much as universal health care.

Or that he flies in just for an anniversary dinner with his wife, Michelle - herself an empowering image for all women.

"Here you&#39;ve got this brilliant, Ivy League-educated, light-skinned black man who chooses as his wife an equally smart, dark-skinned black woman who is almost as tall as him," Harris-Lacewell says. "That makes me feel he cares about who I am as a black woman."

For a segment of the nation so long invisible, "You look at Michelle and you&#39;re like, &#39;Yes! He sees me.&#39; "

While he holds open the door. *

LBellatrix
03-07-2008, 11:12 AM
Brilliant! Thanks for posting this. :)

kurliehead
03-07-2008, 11:19 AM
Loved the article, curlycoilyfroily, and the picture in your siggy makes me pause everytime I see it. :)

aquababie19
03-07-2008, 11:41 AM
thanks for the post :)

MsShel330
03-07-2008, 12:07 PM
:yes: :clap: I read the Annette John-Hall article earlier today and agree with it. The first article was on point as well. Hillary isn&#39;t the only one who needs to read this; all of the "mainstream" media needs to read it too.

curlycoilyfroily
03-07-2008, 12:09 PM
no prob, ladies. didn&#39;t that last part just make you *sigh* ? :blush:



Loved the article, curlycoilyfroily, and the picture in your siggy makes me pause everytime I see it. :)
[/b]

:yes: me too.




:yes: :clap: I read the Annette John-Hall article earlier today and agree with it. The first article was on point as well. Hillary isn&#39;t the only one who needs to read this; all of the "mainstream" media needs to read it too.
[/b]

Amen.

delta98
03-07-2008, 02:00 PM
[
"Here you&#39;ve got this brilliant, Ivy League-educated, light-skinned black man who chooses as his wife an equally smart, dark-skinned black woman who is almost as tall as him," Harris-Lacewell says. "That makes me feel he cares about who I am as a black woman."

For a segment of the nation so long invisible, "You look at Michelle and you&#39;re like, &#39;Yes! He sees me.&#39; "

While he holds open the door. *
[/quote]

This has been a thought of mine since researching who Barack Obama is....

deecoily
03-07-2008, 02:20 PM
Excellent articles ladies! This thread is going on the email list.

Poetic_Butterfly
03-07-2008, 02:24 PM
Excellent article! :D I could relate to this article on so many different levels about Hilary Clinton. Thank you for sharing it here on NP.

Peace,
Rasta

BrnNappyGrl
03-07-2008, 04:47 PM
Instead of creating a totally new thread, I thought I&#39;d add this op-ed by Annette John-Hall of the Phila. Inquirer (http://www.philly.com/philly/columnists/20080307_Annette_John-Hall__Black_womens_Clinton_problem.html)here as it expresses a lot of feelings about Hillary and Barack that we&#39;ve discussed here.

Annette John-Hall: Black women&#39;s Clinton problem

By Annette John-Hall

Faith in the choir
Yes, many of us did give her the "Oh, no, she didn&#39;t" arched brow when she mocked the celestial-choirs kind of hope that Obama inspires.

"Celestial choirs is what got my grandmother through," Harris-Lacewell says. "It&#39;s what got all of our grandmothers through."

But hope doesn&#39;t necessarily come in a color or gender.

Campaign director Maggie Williams, an African American, answered Hillary&#39;s call for help and righted her house just in time. That doesn&#39;t make her any less black.

And just because Oprah&#39;s an Obama supporter doesn&#39;t mean she&#39;s any less woman.

Comparable policies aside, maybe what it really comes down to is a gut feeling. A father who takes time off the campaign to take his daughters trick-or-treating, as Obama did, resonates as much as universal health care.

Or that he flies in just for an anniversary dinner with his wife, Michelle - herself an empowering image for all women.

"Here you&#39;ve got this brilliant, Ivy League-educated, light-skinned black man who chooses as his wife an equally smart, dark-skinned black woman who is almost as tall as him," Harris-Lacewell says. "That makes me feel he cares about who I am as a black woman."

For a segment of the nation so long invisible, "You look at Michelle and you&#39;re like, &#39;Yes! He sees me.&#39; "

While he holds open the door. *
[/b]

:clap: :clap: :clap: Amen Sister Annette, amen

curlycoilyfroily, your signature image made me... girl it&#39;s absolutely beautiful and so appropriate.

honeybunch2k5
03-08-2008, 06:21 AM
I was thinking more like Miss Anne, but Scarlet O&#39;Hara will do,too.



It doesn’t fly because it is tired, predictable, manipulative and mo’ like Scarlett Ol’Heffa!

Her act is soooo raggedy that it fails to even work on most Rhett Butler’s (WM) in this country.
[/b]
:lol:

LuaBonita
03-08-2008, 10:32 AM
GOOD articles... this mammy stuff is interesting. i never came across this theory until i started posting on NP

curlycoilyfroily, love the siggy too