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  1. #1
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    Hello Ladies (and gentlemen? lol),

    How can you tell when a product has protein in it? I am concerned with putting too much protein in my hair. Every so often, I DC using ORS replenishing pak which I know has protein. I also use Elasta QP mango butter which I read has some protein. Sometimes the replenshing pak leaves my hair as soft as clouds (at least what I imagine clouds feel like) and other times it leaves my hair feeling hard and almost dry. The same goes for the elasta QP. So, I'm thinking it has to do with a protein balance. I need to get my protein maintenance together. In essence, I want to know what moisturizers don't have protein. But I also want to know how to detect protein so I can better choose my hair products. Please help! Anything would be helpful!!!
    "Don't worry you don't have to like my natural hair. I love it enough for the both of us.

  2. #2
    knharde is offline Active Nappturality Member
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    Well, for starters, that ORS replenishing pak has silicones in it, so your hard hair could come from that or anything else you are using with -cones and -siloxanes.

    As for protein, either it will be listed directly (i.e. wheat protein) if it was added in small amounts, or you could be using ingredients that have a natural amount of protein in them (aloe vera, any herbs, oils, or butters).

    I would suggest you just do a bit of trial and error. When it comes to experiencing hard, dry hair, it can come from anything starting with the shampoo you are using to the leave in moisturizers and everything in between. It could also be the weather, in which your summer time regimen is no longer good enough for the cold winter.

  3. #3
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    Well, for starters, that ORS replenishing pak has silicones in it, so your hard hair could come from that or anything else you are using with -cones and -siloxanes.

    As for protein, either it will be listed directly (i.e. wheat protein) if it was added in small amounts, or you could be using ingredients that have a natural amount of protein in them (aloe vera, any herbs, oils, or butters).

    I would suggest you just do a bit of trial and error. When it comes to experiencing hard, dry hair, it can come from anything starting with the shampoo you are using to the leave in moisturizers and everything in between. It could also be the weather, in which your summer time regimen is no longer good enough for the cold winter.
    [/b]
    ITA!

    You may also want to be on the look out for:
    Lanolin requires organo-phosphate pesticides and insecticides to protect it from rancidity

    Collagen
    Fibrous protein in vertebrates. Usually derived from animal tissue. Can't affect the skin's own collagen. An allergen. Alternatives: soy protein, almond oil, amla oil.

    Elastin
    Protein found in the neck ligaments and aortas of cows. Similar to collagen. Can't affect the skin's own elasticity. Alternatives: synthetics, protein from plant tissues.

    Gelatin
    Protein obtained by boiling skin, tendons, ligaments, and/or bones with water. From horses, cows and pigs. Used in shampoos, face masks, and other cosmetics. Used as a thickener for fruit gelatins and puddings. In candies, marshmallows, cakes, ice cream, yogurts. On photographic film and in vitamins as a coating and as capsules. Sometimes used to assist in "clearing" wines.
    Alternatives: carrageen (carrageenan, Irish moss), seaweeds (algin, agar-agar, kelpÑused in jellies, plastics, medicine), pectin from fruits, dextrins, locust bean gum, cotton gum, silica gel. Marshmallows were originally made from the root of the marsh mallow plant. Vegetarian capsules are now available from several companies.

    Hyaluronic acid
    A protein found in umbilical cords and the fluids around the joints. Used in cosmetics. Alternatives: plant oils.

    Hydrolyzed animal protein
    In cosmetics, especially shampoo and hair treatments. Alternatives: soy protein, other vegetable proteins, amla oil

    Keratin
    Protein from the ground-up horns, hooves, feathers, quills, and hair of various animals. In hair rinses, shampoos, permanent wave solutions. Alternatives: almond oil, soy protein, amla oil (from the fruit of an Indian tree), human hair from salons. Rosemary, carrots and nettle give body and strand strength to hair.

    Methionine
    Essential amino acid found in various proteins (usually from egg albumen and casein). Used as a texturiser and for freshness in potato chips. Alternatives: synthetics.

    Placenta
    Placenta Polypeptides Protein. Afterbirth. Contains waste matter eliminated by the fetus. Derived from the uterus of slaughtered animals. Animal placenta is widely used in skin creams, shampoos, masks, etc. Alternative: kelp.

    [/b]
    Source:
    Choose Cruelty Free - Australia

    You will need to do some research on protein and protein bonds and the effect that it may cause to your hair.
    There's loads of info. out there on protein.

    Just a question but do you clarify your hair at all?
    If not, give it a try, it's best to start with a clean slate before your start your hair regime of DC and other goodies in your hair care arsenal.
    HTH



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  4. #4
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    Just wanted to add that if an ingredient is listed as &#39;hydrolized blank&#39; (i.e. hydrolized silk, hydrolized oat etc) it is a protein/form of protein. Brewer&#39;s yeast is also considered to be a protein/affect the hair like a protein.

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