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Thread: Mehandi Henna

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    Question Mehandi Henna

    I was reading the other post about henna and Im also interested. Ha anybody actually tried the Ancient Sunrise® Henna for African Hair??? Its suppose to be specifically for black people. I was just wondering if the color shows up good or does it work at all. I was also curious about the Lush brand. Is there product reputable??? Help me out guyssss!!! :P

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    I don't know about Ancient Sunrise, but I bought some "Celebration" from those ppl and it turned out to be nothing but plain ol' Jamila. All they did was take the Jamila bag out of the Jamila box and put it in a box called Celebration and charge $2.00 extra!
    Believe what you want to believe, but I'll bet my last dollar there does not exist a bushel of henna grown "specifically for African hair"? If you do your research, you will find that different types of henna are sifted differently, some moreso than others.

    I suspect this so-called Ancient Sunrise is just one of the finer sifted hennas on the market that you could buy for less $$ elsewhere.

    It's called "marketing".

    I've tried Lush in brunette before and was happy with the results. I didn't care for all that block breaking (the henna comes pre-mixed in hard blocks). I prefer my powders, but Lush, imo and experience is pretty reputable. hth

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    As I understand it, the henna for AA hair is marketed as such because it is a finer sift. That's the point, it makes it easier to wash out of the hair. I you take into account that finer sifting means larger quantities are discarded (i.e. the courser part) then it stands to reason that it would be more expensive. I've sifted my own henna`and I know that i discard quite a significant amount. Ther finer I sift the more I lose.

    I believe that the 2011 crop of Jamila had a particularly strong colour, they called this 'celebration' to distinguish it from other Jamilar crops. I bought some of the 2011 Jamila crop from another company, it did indeed have a stronger colour/better dye release than henna I'd bought previously.

    @LadyDay; I've not used Sunrise, but the 'for African hair' tag is more about the sift that the henna colour, though the addition of indigo obviously takes it to black as this is the most common colour sort by black women.

    DeBe

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    It was my first taste with henna and I liked it. The color was not as red as I wanted but hey it was my first time and I went the safe route. My only beef is the price but Mehandi is a good place to start if it's your first henna experience. Never tried the Lush brand. After the Ancient Sunrise I found local Indian grocery stores to go to so I by the brands they have like Jamila and Naajo. These ended up giving me the red color that I wanted.
    "I live, I love, I slay and I am content"-Conan

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    Quote Originally Posted by debe_999 View Post
    As I understand it, the henna for AA hair is marketed as such because it is a finer sift. That's the point, it makes it easier to wash out of the hair. I you take into account that finer sifting means larger quantities are discarded (i.e. the courser part) then it stands to reason that it would be more expensive. I've sifted my own henna`and I know that i discard quite a significant amount. Ther finer I sift the more I lose.

    I believe that the 2011 crop of Jamila had a particularly strong colour, they called this 'celebration' to distinguish it from other Jamilar crops. I bought some of the 2011 Jamila crop from another company, it did indeed have a stronger colour/better dye release than henna I'd bought previously.


    DeBe
    According to the actual company who distribute the Jamila brand of henna, they do NOT do separate crops. So the Jamila in the "Celebration" box in the tin foil wrapping marked Summer Crops 20XX is the SAME as the Jamila in the foil wrapping marked Summer Crop 20XX packaged inside the regular Jamila box. The only difference between the two is $2. And according to HennaSooq, there is only ONE company that manufactures Jamila in the silver foil wrapping.

    There are only 2 "different" types of Jamila Henna.
    1. Jamila BAQ (in the silver foil wrapping with the crop date stamped in red), and
    2. Jamila Henna for Hair (in the plain cellophane).

    Again, according to HennaSooq, there is not such thing as henna for AA hair. Finer sifted henna is finer sifted henna.

    It would stand to reason that those making these erroneous claims do so from a marketing stand point.

    If you would like, I would be happy to re-post here the direct email I received from the Jamila manufacturers regarding their crops.

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    I did say that the sift is the only reason it's described as for AA hair.
    Quote Originally Posted by debe_999 View Post
    As I understand it, the henna for AA hair is marketed as such because it is a finer sift. That's the point, it makes it easier to wash out of the hair...
    Basically it harder to wash Henna from kinky hair (or locs) than it is to wash it from straight hair. Its also easier to wash the fine sift from any hair than it is to wash the coarse sift out. So for Afro hair its better to use the finer sift for this reason alone, nothing to do with the colour or type of henna used. From my reading the only claim that is made on the 'for afro hair' henna is that its a finer sift. So I really don't see it as eroneous marketing.

    On one hand you're saying the henna is date stamped on the other you're saying there is no separation of the different crops. There's a conflict between those two statements.

    At some point henna from year 20xx will run out so any henna you buy will be from a later year (unless someone finds an old store of it somewhere) Yes one company is cashing in on it by calling it 'celebration' henna, but truth be told, I did celebrate when I managed to secure some of the crop (not from that company) and again when saw the difference between that and henna I'd previously used. If I recall correctly any other henna sold by that company, other than the 'celebration' henna is from a previous crop yearwise.

    Henna is a plant, like any plant the crop from some years will be better than the crop from other years depending on the conditions of growth (weather wise and cultivation wise) for that year. It's as true about henna as it is about grapes. All I'm saying is that many henna users (I'm not relying on the statements of those making a living from selling it) have stated that the 2011 crop is particulalry good in terms of the colour release and the colour it produces. Having used it myself I agree with those claims.

    As for the higher price, I know that when I buy 100g of coarse henna for £2, then sift it and throw way maybe 10% made up of the fibrous henna, I now have 90g of henna for £2, so yes its more expensive per gram, so again I don't see it as eroneous marketing/selling. For me that small extra expense is worth the decreased rinsing time, even if I'm the one spending that time on the sifting. In which case I'm not paying someone else to spend that time sifting.

    I agree with the facts you've put forward, I just don't agree that it's eroneous marketing, because the information is out there, including on the very sites doing that marketing.

    DeBe

    ETA: Incidently, the difference between BAQ henna and henna for hair, is that Body Art Quality is a finer sift. The same plant is used, but body art needs a finer sift in order to produce the fine details favoured by many.
    Last edited by DeBe; 02-08-2012 at 11:24 PM.

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    On one hand you're saying the henna is date stamped on the other you're saying there is no separation of the different crops. There's a conflict between those two statements.

    Let me clarify (and this info is readily available on the net):

    Different leaves from different parts of the same henna plant will yield different dye contents.

    The lesser of these leaves is packaged specifically for HAIR because it is considered substandard for body art.

    The "better" leaves are packaged as BAQ henna.

    Even though these leaves come from the SAME crop.

    Jamila packages the "lesser" henna in a clear cellophane wrapping that comes in a plain white Jamila box.

    The BAQ leaves are packaged in a foil package that is date stamped (ie Summer Crop 2009) and then boxed in a silvery Jamila box.

    SAME crop, DIFFERENT leaves. Again, all this information is on the net. This is not me speculating.

    Several years ago (5 or 6, approx) Jamila changed their packaging of their BAQ to the silver date stamped packaging to decrease fraud. Given this information, logic would dictate if I receive a box of CELEBRATION containing a silver wrapped package of henna red lettered stamped with JAMILA SUMMER CROP 2009, then I must interpret that information to be correct and recognize that I have just paid $2 more for JAMILA SUMMER CROP 2009 PACKAGED IN A BROWN CELEBRATION BOX, WHEN THE SAME JAMILA SUMMER CROP 2009 HENNA IN THE REGULAR SILVER BOX IS SELLING ON THE SAME SITE FOR $2 LESS.

    If you buy Cheerios in a Wheaties box and pay $2 more, are you not just over paying for Cheerios?

    Again, all of this info is on the web and easily verifiable.

    Now having said all this, since my transaction took place in 2011 and I received an over priced 2009 crop, and henna typically last 3 years, does this not point to some shady
    business practices? I have to say yes.

    Now if you take two different hennas (let's say Morrocan and Rajasthani for argument sake). I do believe Morrocan is stringier, therefore not as finely sifted as Rajasthani. Rajasthani is easily rinsed out of AA hair. However, this same Rajasthani is repackaged by another company, sold as HENNA FOR AA HAIR, and the price is jacked up $1 or more, then I still say the marketing is on the erroneous side.

    And if a company is willing to charge $2 extra for shifting henna into a different box, then it stands to reason said company has no problem overcharging naive black women for the same "special" henna they can purchase elsewhere for less.

    ETA: You are correct. I have erroneously used the word erroneous. What I should have said was the marketing was cleverly deceitful.
    Last edited by Micheli; 02-08-2012 at 11:35 PM.

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    anyhoo, ladyday, i hope you are getting all this!

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    OK I got you. I researched a whole load of companies when I wanted to buy the 2011 crop. I know I decided against buying from the company that advertised the 'celebration' henna, but I don't recall exactly why I didn't use them. I know I got the impression that it was 2011 henna. If it wasn't the 2011 crop, then I'd have to agree with the erroneous tag, because I was definately left with the strong impression that it was the 2011 crop.

    The only company I know that markets henna for AA hair, states quite clearly that the only thing that makes it such is that its a finer sift, if its a finer sift there will be more wastage hence costlier by the weight (as well as time to sift further). If we're refering to the same company then eroneous is an unfair tag as they're open about it.

    I don't know if the BAQ and hair quality is treated differently by different suppliers (countires of origin), but the information I got some time ago when I first looked into henna, is that the only difference with BAQ is that its a finer sift. Though I do know that the lower grade leaves are used in some henna - my understand has been, its a case of finding a brand that uses good quality leaves, as opposed to choosing between BAQ and hair henna. I begin to suspect that it's the same as the difference between locs/locks/dreadlocks etc. I.e. a question of termilology being used as I recall information about poor(er) quality leaves in some brands and not others.

    I can't speak for Jamila in particular or any specific type (origin) of henna, my research was around henna production/distribution across the board. I also compared user reponses with the company claims in an attempt to get a feel for the integrity of the company(s).

    I think LadyDay is getting a taste of why identifying the right henna for one's hair is a time consuming business. but sooooo worth it when you find the right one for you.

    While I absolutly love the Jamila, I'd like to type the Yemeni at some point, it's supposed to give a more cherry type colour over time.

    @LadyDay, at least Michelli and I are in agreement that BAQ is the best henna to use colourwise and in terms of it being a finer sift than 'hair' quality. Though I begin to see her take on the whole thing and will definately avoid purchasing from said company. If you're happy to pay the price difference for AA henna, then you could try that also, but don't expect a different quality/colour other than the sift.

    Something I tried when deciding on the henna I used, was to get one each (100g each) of the types the research led me to. Mixed both at the same time, then tested the dye release of each at intervals (put a dab on the skin for a few minutes and see if you get a good colour, or drop some on a kitchen tissue and see the strength of colour that seeps across the tissue)

    Any henna not used can be frozen and reused at a later date or you could just mix up a tiny batch.

    One last point - while I haven't used Hennasoog, I've heard many, many good reports on the quality of their henna and no bad ones.

    DeBe

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    Oh, regarding the Lush, I've not used it, but most of the reports I hear about it, is that the colour fades really quickly. As its (comparatively) pricey I never bothered to try it out.

    Maybe someone who has tried it will chime in. I fact I may try it out myself one day.

    DeBe

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