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  1. #11
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    Hi! My path into public health is non-traditional. I don't have an academic background in public health, but I do have a background in public policy, education, and international research. I was hired by a federal agency based on my background and my transferable skills (they were really impressed with my writing and research skills). I'm building a career by focusing on monitoring and evaluating programs (for which you need financial management and project management skills), with a (broad) topical focus on health disparities, non-communicable diseases, and social determinants of health.

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  3. #12
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    I'm wondering if anyone who is at, over, or close to achieving 100K doesn't have a degree higher than a Bachelor's. I am studying public relations and intend on being done with school after my BA (about a year).

    I've always been told and have seen wonderful examples of women in PR who make lovely incomes, over 100k, but I'm not sure how far they took their education. I'm also not sure how long it took them to get there, and if that would be achievable with today's economy versus the one they had when they were my age.

    Of course it all depends on the field (and I'll be honest, I didn't read all of the last thread). So I'm just wondering who was able to hit 100k without spending so much time in school. Or if anyone here is working in PR.

  4. #13
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    Bump! ^^ I'm interested to know, too.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by PammiePC View Post
    I'm wondering if anyone who is at, over, or close to achieving 100K doesn't have a degree higher than a Bachelor's. I am studying public relations and intend on being done with school after my BA (about a year).

    I've always been told and have seen wonderful examples of women in PR who make lovely incomes, over 100k, but I'm not sure how far they took their education. I'm also not sure how long it took them to get there, and if that would be achievable with today's economy versus the one they had when they were my age.

    Of course it all depends on the field (and I'll be honest, I didn't read all of the last thread). So I'm just wondering who was able to hit 100k without spending so much time in school. Or if anyone here is working in PR.
    It really depends. If your done with school in a year I hope you are in professional orgs for PR AND surrounding disciplines Try Black Public Relations Society (local and national) Join orgs that intersect with what topics in PR you are interested in. Join boards on LinkedIn, participate but READ, read everything. Read ad age and ad week DAILY. Are you in a strictly PR program at school or is it integrated. Learn all you can about digital, do as much extracurricular as you can. When there are events in your community or school write a press release. If you can get it used somewhere great if not publish it to your blog...Tell me you have a blog. Yes I'm trying to get you samples and things that you can count as work experience parallel to education, this is how you rise up the latter quickly and stay there.

  6. #15
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    I will, soon enough! Believe that...

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by PammiePC View Post
    Of course it all depends on the field (and I'll be honest, I didn't read all of the last thread). So I'm just wondering who was able to hit 100k without spending so much time in school. Or if anyone here is working in PR.
    I can't speak about PR, but I've been around a lot of people who make $100k or more with just a Bachelor's degree. It depends on the field and how aggressive/ambitious you are. It's possible.
    Last edited by chachadiva; 11-06-2012 at 01:54 AM.
    No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. -Eleanor Roosevelt

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by PammiePC View Post
    I'm wondering if anyone who is at, over, or close to achieving 100K doesn't have a degree higher than a Bachelor's. I am studying public relations and intend on being done with school after my BA (about a year).

    I've always been told and have seen wonderful examples of women in PR who make lovely incomes, over 100k, but I'm not sure how far they took their education. I'm also not sure how long it took them to get there, and if that would be achievable with today's economy versus the one they had when they were my age.

    Of course it all depends on the field (and I'll be honest, I didn't read all of the last thread). So I'm just wondering who was able to hit 100k without spending so much time in school. Or if anyone here is working in PR.
    I only have a few college credits. It helps if you have a skill.
    Last hit of creamy crack: 11/24/09
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  9. #18
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    in the DC area we've got loads of 100K-ers (mostly feds who through the years and step and grade increases hit the $100K mark) and the ones in the private sector without advanced degrees have certifications, CPA, CGFM, PMP, etc...or one of the many teckie certifications. That seems to be what will set you apart salary wise. Then there's who you know and switching firms, not excessively but enough to give you a decent bump every few years....
    "The soul takes flight to the world that is invisible, but there arriving she is sure of bliss and forever dwells in paradise." - Plato


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    Quote Originally Posted by Savvyone View Post
    Then there's who you know and switching firms, not excessively but enough to give you a decent bump every few years....
    That's something they don't tell you about. The party line is corporate loyalty. The easiest way to increase your salary is to change companies. Make strategic moves.
    No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. -Eleanor Roosevelt

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  12. #20
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    and here's more proof of it Cha....Companies look to bonuses instead of salary increases in an uncertain economy

    By Sarah Halzack, Updated: Tuesday, November 6, 7:00 AM

    Faced with tight corporate budgets and an uncertain economic climate, employers are increasingly turning to bonuses and performance-based pay as a strategy for retaining top-performing workers.
    Human resource experts say this approach to compensation is attractive because it is flexible and allows companies to reward good work without creating additional fixed costs.
    “If the organization is not having a good year, maybe their financial results are way down, then it allows cash payments to commensurately reflect poorer financial performance,” said Kerry Chou, compensation practice leader at non-profit research group WorldAtWork.
    But these one-time payouts are not just advantageous because they can be trimmed or withheld in an event of financial shock. They also provide a way for companies to incentivize productivity.
    “They’re placing their bets more on this idea of putting pay at risk and paying big if the company wins big,” said Ken Abosch, compensation practice leader at human resource consulting firm Aon Hewitt.
    The switch to this compensation approach has intensified during the recent economic gloominess, but reflects a long-term trend.
    Variable pay, a category of compensation that includes bonuses and other performance-based pay, was used by 82 percent of employers this year, up from 79 percent last year, according to a study by WorldAtWork. Another survey by Aon Hewitt found that companies allocated 12 percent of their payroll budgets for variable pay this year. In contrast, they spent just 3 percent of those budgets on salary increases.
    That shift has occurred over the last 10 years, said Abosch, because “there’s a very strong belief and there’s evidence and academic research that shows that variable pay does create focus among employees.”
    In other words, bonuses help foster a concept known among human resource professionals as “employee engagement,” which is a measure of how invested a worker is in the company and his or her job.
    When employees are highly engaged, the theory goes, they do better work.
    But perhaps just as important, they are more committed to the company. And cultivating loyalty could be critical at a time when many companies are acutely focused on retaining top talent.
    “If the company performs and the [bonus] plan is funded, that doesn’t mean we should just hand those dollars to everybody,” said Laurie Bienstock, a leader for rewards consulting at Towers Watson.
    Instead, a company can target the money at the staffers it values most.
    There are many varieties of bonuses, including those tied to the performance of the entire company or of a particular business unit.
    But when it comes to retaining key workers, employers most commonly offer an incentive called a spot bonus, said Jeanie Adkins, co-leader of the rewards segment at consulting firm Mercer. This type of reward is a lump-sum payment given to an individual for good work.
    The increased use of variable pay spans nearly all sectors, even in government, education and nonprofit organizations. And though this type of compensation was once largely offered to executives and managers, experts say it is increasingly becoming available to lower ranks of workers.
    In the Washington area, human resource consultants say the trend toward more variable pay has become particularly pronounced as worries mount about the looming “fiscal cliff.”
    “In the Washington market, I think we’re very much being impacted with what’s happening politically,” said Kathy Albarado, chief executive of Helios HR, a Reston-based consulting firm.
    Amid the uncertainty over the combination of tax hikes and spending cuts, some local human resource consultants say they’ve noticed an increase in clients who want to explore variable pay as a strategy for keeping payroll budgets nimble.
    “They’re going to reward their top performers, and it just means that there’s going to be less to go around,” Albarado said.
    "The soul takes flight to the world that is invisible, but there arriving she is sure of bliss and forever dwells in paradise." - Plato


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