User Tag List

Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Hand of God.
    Posts
    1,160
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    12

    Default

    I know this is a vague question. I lived in Germany for awhile. And I am considering leaving the US after my college graduation. I really want to break my “western” view of the world.

    I am thinking about teaching in England, Japan, or the Caribbean. So I am interested in hearing from sistahs in those areas.

    How is the cost of living? Why do you choose to live where you live? How are race relations in your city? What is the social scene likw ehere you are? What do you do (work-wise)? Just anything you want to share!

    *Live & Let Live*
    :: Unapologetically Natural for 27 years! :: I my locs!

    Click here to PANK yourself!


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    44
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    I commend you on wanting to travel and expand your horizons.

    I remember thinking when I arrived in the US that I have never felt 'black' until I came here. That constant reminder of your race greatly influences everything you do, think and say.
    I have great respect for AAs who live all their lives conscious of their race and representing everyone and having not started a revilution or killing spree....yet

    I have said this and say it again, I am not sure who started the lie that America is the only liveable nation and it is sad that many AAs do not venture to travel further than the Caribbean. Many people have a great fear of travelling beyond the selected few nations because of fear of being killed by some tribesman or getting AIDS by proxy
    I cannot tell you how many times I have been asked how many people are left in the country after all the AIDS deaths or whether if they come home with me they will have enough to eat or a place to sleep. Some just say they wil never visit Africa because they are scared of getting some disease :blush: <_<
    Many of the whites propagating this lie themselves have homes all over Africa. Smart way of killing the competition.

    I have lived in Kenya and South Africa which were predominatly black and that makes a huge difference. When you are part of the majority then go to a place like the US and you are instantly a minority it is jolting. Some things you worry about constantly as a minority are non issues when you are part of the majority population. There is a certain security in numbers.

    In the states where you always seem to &#39;stand out&#39; positively or negatively, in a predominately black nation the &#39;blending in&#39; is a welcome comfort. In SA our experience can at times parallel the AA experience but these are commonalities in the black world.

    I notice when I go home that I feel a certain &#39;freedom&#39; and happiness when I see a sea of black faces. If you are raised in a minority culture this can be a culture shock as I learnt from my African American friends who travelling or live in Africa now.

    Hope this helped even though I digressed a tad.



  3. #3
    pisces33 is offline Active Nappturality Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Valley of the Kings
    Posts
    1,503
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    12

    Default

    That&#39;s why I&#39;m learning a couple of languages in order to expand my travels/living outside of the U.S.

    It sucks here sometimes
    :icon_headshake:

  4. #4
    aymst1 Guest

    Default

    op:

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Miami Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,854
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    14

    Default

    :smil3f9cf95099cff: When I was stationed in Korea, I witnessed an accident. A GI hit a Korean woman. When the American MPs arrived, they asked the woman who hit her. She said an American. They asked her the color of the American. She looked at the MPs like they were crazy. I started laughing. All she saw was an American, she did not see color first. I thought that was priceless.
    Livin.

  6. #6
    sonce Guest

    Default

    Originally posted by kadburyz@Apr 8 2005, 03:31 PM
    When you are part of the majority then go to a place like the US and you are instantly a minority it is jolting. Some things you worry about constantly as a minority are non issues when you are part of the majority population. There is a certain security in numbers.

    In the states where you always seem to &#39;stand out&#39; positively or negatively, in a predominately black nation the &#39;blending in&#39; is a welcome comfort.

    I notice when I go home that I feel a certain &#39;freedom&#39; and happiness when I see a sea of black faces. If you are raised in a minority culture this can be a culture shock as I learnt from my African American friends who travelling or live in Africa now.

    Hope this helped even though I digressed a tad.
    [snapback]797668[/snapback]
    I completely agree with everything you said and I know exactly what you mean. Whenever I&#39;m back home in nigeria, there&#39;s this freedom that I feel when everywhere I look the faces are like mine. There&#39;s no pressure to be extraordinary or prove stereotypes wrong or be mindful of the fact that I am black. There&#39;s no need to worry that a mistake I make will reflect badly on everyone that looks remotely like me. I&#39;m free to be myself and do me. I&#39;m not in the state of semi-constant watchfulness and tension that I often experience when I&#39;m back in the states.

    It&#39;s always a bit sad when I have to come back to the united states and once again assume that mantle of watchfulness. It&#39;s tiring to have to be alert and protective of myself against the psychological damage and subtle attacks I feel black people are subjected to on a daily basis in this country.

  7. #7
    pisces33 is offline Active Nappturality Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Valley of the Kings
    Posts
    1,503
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    12

    Lightbulb

    Originally posted by sunschild57@Apr 8 2005, 05:13 PM
    :smil3f9cf95099cff: When I was stationed in Korea, I witnessed an accident. A GI hit a Korean woman. When the American MPs arrived, they asked the woman who hit her. She said an American. They asked her the color of the American. She looked at the MPs like they were crazy. I started laughing. All she saw was an American, she did not see color first. I thought that was priceless.
    [snapback]798357[/snapback]

    That speaks volumes about how we tend to view each other sometimes.

  8. #8
    vinny_46 Guest

    Default

    Wow, sonce & kadbuyz, I really enjoyed your posts. Very interesting. I want to travel & live abroad in the future.

    I&#39;m not ashamed to be an American, but I never thought of race relations for us AA&#39;s as you put it, but it&#39;s sooo true.

    I would like to experience what you do when you go home someday. I&#39;d like to taste what you taste.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Obamanation
    Posts
    6,777
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    26

    Default

    Originally posted by sonce@Apr 8 2005, 09:40 PM
    I completely agree with everything you said and I know exactly what you mean. Whenever I&#39;m back home in nigeria, there&#39;s this freedom that I feel when everywhere I look the faces are like mine. There&#39;s no pressure to be extraordinary or prove stereotypes wrong or be mindful of the fact that I am black. There&#39;s no need to worry that a mistake I make will reflect badly on everyone that looks remotely like me. I&#39;m free to be myself and do me. I&#39;m not in the state of semi-constant watchfulness and tension that I often experience when I&#39;m back in the states.
    [snapback]798478[/snapback]
    Your words are like a breath of fresh air.. so enchanting, and making me more and more interested in traveling.
    Quit tripping on what you're wearing on your behind and get some education in your head.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Sarf London
    Posts
    578
    Reviews
    Read 0 Reviews
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    I grew up in Jamaica and came to England when l was 18. The first thing l realised was that l was no longer the majority but the minority in this country. The differences between both countries shows itself on a daily basis, but for anyone who wants to know what its like in England, here&#39;s a few things l&#39;ve seen:

    1. You will be the minority
    2. You will pay TV licence (if you have a tv you pay this to the government about £130 per year).
    3. You get tv shows and movies after the whole world does.
    4. The sense of togetherness l had in Ja is gone, here, every man for themselves.
    5. Decreased sense of self, no history or culture taught in alot of schools and even homes.
    6. Lots of negative stereotyping of black people even by our own black folks.
    7. British culture was a shock to me. They show anything on tv, especially after 9pm (watershed). In Jamaica, no matter what time of day, no profanity, nudity etc.
    8. As well as tax and national insurance being taken out of your pay every month, you will have to pay &#39;council tax&#39;. This council tax pays for your services such as the police, garbage disposal etc. Mine for the year is £900 :Angry_boese008:

    Ok some good parts.........

    If l decide l dont wanna work or if l cant work, l&#39;ll get money (not much) mind you, my rent and council tax paid for me.

    Dont have to pay to go to the doctor, or hospital, some dont have to pay for their prescriptions. This is all paid of course by the range of taxes that we pay, so l guess its not really an advantage cuz we already pay for it :blush:

    ummmmm...still thinking................


Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •