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  1. #1
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    EDITED TO UPDATE LINK: https://scholarship.law.duke.edu/cgi...&context=djglp

    I was doing some research for my school studies and came across and interesting article:

    "The Hair Dilemma: Conform to Mainstream Expectations or Emphasize Racial Identity" by Ashleigh Shelby Rosette and Tracy L. Dumas. This article appeared in the Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy (April 2007).

    The Hair Dilemma: Conform to Mainstream Expectations or Emphasize Racial Identity
    Article highlights:

    In this Essay we focus on the dilemma that Black women face with regard to their hairstyle choices in the workplace. Our decision to focus primarily on Black women does not assert that one minority group is more important than another group. It does, however, acknowledge that each minority group likely faces its own obstacles and hurdles that are specific to its race, culture, and experiences. We chose to focus on Black women because of the negative stereotypes that are unique to Blacks given the historical context of segregation and inferiority in the United States; because of the preponderance of social science research that contrasts Blacks -- more so than any other racial minority -- to Whites in the context of prejudice, racism, and social inequality; and because of the unique texture and appearance of Black hair which in its natural kinky state is the opposite of straight hair, the Western standard of beauty.
    Last edited by deecoily; 10-12-2019 at 03:28 AM. Reason: Update to new LINK
    [SIZE=2][color=#663366]My personal style: Bohemian Glamour![/color]

    Date of last and final chemical fire cream: [color=#CC6600]September 16, 2005[/color]
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    "I am sure that God Who began the good work in me will keep on working in me until the day Jesus Christ comes again." (Philippians 1:6; New Life Version)[/SIZE]

  2. #2
    aeburo is offline Active Nappturality Member
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    Thanks for the info!
    "Good hair is hair that do its job which is to keep your head warm." -Tiffany Turner (Washington Post)

  3. #3
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    Thanks for sharing the article. I am going to read it and comment again later!!

    Peace,
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    "As you educate a woman, you educate the family. If you educate the girls, you educate the future."

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    "Black women spend approximately $50 million per year on chemical straighteners alone"


    Wow...just wow. The things our community could do with 50 million dollars annually....

  5. #5
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    Good article. It's very sad that many black women still feel the need to conform to the European standard of beauty in order to "get ahead" and feel attractive. I've always maintained that the idea of conforming, while race based is also gender specific. We live in a very shallow and superficial society, where women, black women in particular are made to feel bad if they do not fit the mainstream's expectation of femininity. It's even more stinging when our OWN men continue to parade this message in front of us. Honestly, I sometimes feel that black women only have eachother to look out for and this is why we need to start being more cordial and uplifting to one another.

    We need to instill pride into our daughters, if we want a future generation of confident black women who are not afraid to remain true to themselves. Remember, it starts with us (the adults).
    [b][color=#3333FF]BC'ed: April 5, 2007. I MADE IT!! 1 year and counting!! [/color][/b]

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    "But she never goes into an interview or a new job experience without first straightening her hair. . . . "I don't want to be prejudged. And I think a lot of times it's real easy for them to do that because they don't understand how our hair works, and that it's just a hairstyle. I think it's just different to them. And I don't know what their experience has been with Black women with braids. I don't know what they think but I don't want that to be the reason that I don't get the job."

    Hmm... My mom did something similar to this when she went on a job interview... My mother wears long dreadlocks... but she was afraid they would prejudge her skills by her appearance... So she bought a wig and wore it to the interview... Once she got the job, she showed up to work on Monday with her locs out... She said, "Well I already got the job now..." That always bothered me for some reason...
    When I go to interiews i wear a fro, or hairstyle that I feel is pretty... which, in my case, is usually not the norm... But I don't think my hairstyles have ever kept me from getting a job... Even when i was bald I didn't get turned down for jobs... And I will still continue to wear my hair the way I want to job interviews... I want to let my skills speak for me... Not my hairstyle... I want them to think I'm "too black"... Maybe that's just me tho'...
    ~The Artist Formerly Known as Kanye~
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  7. #7
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    I was doing some research for my school studies and came across and interesting article:

    "The Hair Dilemma: Conform to Mainstream Expectations or Emphasize Racial Identity" by Ashleigh Shelby Rosette and Tracy L. Dumas. This article appeared in the Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy (April 2007).

    The Hair Dilemma: Conform to Mainstream Expectations or Emphasize Racial Identity
    Article highlights:

    In this Essay we focus on the dilemma that Black women face with regard to their hairstyle choices in the workplace. Our decision to focus primarily on Black women does not assert that one minority group is more important than another group. It does, however, acknowledge that each minority group likely faces its own obstacles and hurdles that are specific to its race, culture, and experiences. We chose to focus on Black women because of the negative stereotypes that are unique to Blacks given the historical context of segregation and inferiority in the United States; because of the preponderance of social science research that contrasts Blacks -- more so than any other racial minority -- to Whites in the context of prejudice, racism, and social inequality; and because of the unique texture and appearance of Black hair which in its natural kinky state is the opposite of straight hair, the Western standard of beauty.
    [/b]
    Awesome to hear about this.

    This is one to blog
    "But she never goes into an interview or a new job experience without first straightening her hair. . . . "I don't want to be prejudged. And I think a lot of times it's real easy for them to do that because they don't understand how our hair works, and that it's just a hairstyle. I think it's just different to them. And I don't know what their experience has been with Black women with braids. I don't know what they think but I don't want that to be the reason that I don't get the job."[/b]
    I&#39;ve gotta say I&#39;m 180 from where I was on this in law school. It was in law school where I went natural. I was nowhere near napptural, but I&#39;d cut my hair off years before in undergrad. I&#39;d had bad experiences with chemicals. I probably looked a mess. I just don&#39;t have pictures to confirm it because I&#39;d avoid having my picture taken. I just knew chemicals weren&#39;t working no matter what mild formula I used <_< But getting that summer clerkship is key. I fell into line. I got the job. I wore braids consistently after that.

    Now when I go back to the States, I&#39;ll wear my hair nappy in interviews because black is very much part of who I am and I&#39;m not going to cover it up or straighten it out. Let someone tell me my hair isn&#39;t professional because it&#39;s nappy, they&#39;ll hear the most professional lecture ever given to them on the topic, ever.
    "The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it." - Chinese Proverb

    "Fall seven times a day, stand up eight." - Japanese Proverb

    “All truth is good, but not all truth is good to say.” - African Proverb

  8. #8
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    I like this article, and I&#39;m happy that more and more articles are being written on this topic, even if I don&#39;t think it has a major effect on women who think they need relaxed hair to look pretty. I did like the "incognegro" part though. :lol:

  9. #9
    Laluna is offline Active Nappturality Member
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    great article, really...thanks for sharing!

    black women really need to ban together and fight discriminatory practices against natural hair(which really is tantamount to human rights violations) at every single turn. the realities talked about in the article sadden me, but i&#39;m glad that these issues are being addressed.

  10. #10
    Tiye is offline Active Nappturality Member
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    I didn&#39;t read the article so my response is to the thread title. For me there has never been a dilemma. No one ever told me I was expected to straighten my hair to get a job and I&#39;ve never lacked for work.

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