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  1. #1
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    Me and a few friends decided to go to a club the other night. I am currently the only nappy in the bunch, but ive been recruiting. Anyway, im dancing with this black man and he asks me am I straight black. The comment kinda took me by surprise so I gave him a puzzled look. He in turn respons to my look by asking me again was I straight black and further asks am I jamaican or african. I at this point tell him no and am still looking puzzled, especially seeing that I have a southern accent. The man then proceeds to tell me he was asking because of my hair (im currently wearing two strand twists) and said that it looked nice. I thanked him, but thought that it was a sad commentary that a black man would think the only way a black woman would wear her natural hair was if she was either Caribbean or African.

  2. #2
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    It annoys me when people ask me this question, assuming that I'm of 'Black with something special thrown in' because otherwise wouldn't my hair be a disgusting fetid nest of rats? Or almost as bad, assuming that all American Black women have relaxxers/wear horse-hair down to their azzes.

    Ugh.




    OT: From certain traits of my father's, I may very well have Indian/White/whatever in my ancestry, but I don't care to acknowledge them and have no desire to confirm this. If it were legally documented tomorrow that my great-great grandmother was full Cherokee, I would burn the papers. That's just how not fascinated I am with being multi-racial.
    [b][i] Yes, I said I would never subscribe. But I'd rather feel slightly uncomfortable about my sexuality than disrespected for my race.
    [/i][/b]


    [b][SIZE=3]Hypocrisy: prejudice with a halo[/SIZE][/b]

    [b][i]Ambrose Bierce[/i][/b]

    Yep, I'm a gay!

  3. #3
    britni is offline Active Nappturality Member
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    I'm pretty sure I'm "straight black" even though I know that some will say that no one is completely 100% of anything. My mom and two sisters look as if they could be "mixed" especially since they have "good hair", :rolleyes: but my daddy's side is definitely Negro!

    @Hammie: I can definitely respect that, sis.
    happily nappy since 10/12/2006; BC#2 06/19/2008
    I SUPPORT BARACK
    South Carolina! Let's meetup!
    Let's Talk About Writing...

  4. #4
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    Me and a few friends decided to go to a club the other night. I am currently the only nappy in the bunch, but ive been recruiting. Anyway, im dancing with this black man and he asks me am I straight black. The comment kinda took me by surprise so I gave him a puzzled look. He in turn respons to my look by asking me again was I straight black and further asks am I jamaican or african. I at this point tell him no and am still looking puzzled, especially seeing that I have a southern accent. The man then proceeds to tell me he was asking because of my hair (im currently wearing two strand twists) and said that it looked nice. I thanked him, but thought that it was a sad commentary that a black man would think the only way a black woman would wear her natural hair was if she was either Caribbean or African.
    [/b]
    I think it's a fair assumption on his part. In his world, maybe there aren't many African-American women who choose to wear their hair naturally, so he assumes you may be from somewhere else. I know where I live, very few women are nappy.
    My Travel Blog | October 2007 Napptural of the Month (still looking for the link)

    "The reward for conformity was that everyone liked you except yourself."
    ~Rita Mae Brown, Venus Envy

  5. #5
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    anabwi is offline Active Nappturality Member
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    I get asked all the time if I'm Jamaican or if my Dad is Rasta ; born and raised in the good 'ole South.

  6. #6
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    There was that one thread where people talked about being mistaken for another nationality/ethnicity... I loved that thread. Too bad I can't find it.

  7. #7
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    :
    There was that one thread where people talked about being mistaken for another nationality/ethnicity... I loved that thread. Too bad I can't find it.
    [/b]
    :blush: interesting I live in London England and I am of Nigerian origin. Im always getting asked my Nigerians if I'm from the Caribbean. Get that.
    No matter what they say no matter what they do I will go forward.

  8. #8
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    i think the question is quite reasonable since most african americans wear their hair straight or weaved, especially celebrities.

    the funny thing though...caribbean women, are less likely to be natural than american women, imo. instead, it's the caribbean men that tend to wear their hair natural.

  9. #9
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    I think it's a fair assumption on his part. In his world, maybe there aren't many African-American women who choose to wear their hair naturally, so he assumes you may be from somewhere else. I know where I live, very few women are nappy.
    [/b]
    I know right^^^

    Getting used to seeing nappy hair is a process in this (and most other) society. We are not the norm yet, so we should expect comments such as these...

    ~I am who Allah has fashioned me to be~


    Napps/Locks: http://public.fotki.com/malaikablu/loc-journey/

  10. #10
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    My kids used to ask me that all the time. I used to have locs and they would ask me if i was from JA...i'd be like no sweetie...i'm from Arkansas lol...
    But just like one AuNappturale said, he probably doesn't know many natural AA women...i have been noticing in Milwaukee the nappturals have been increasing in numbers

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