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  1. #1
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    Still wondering if it was a good idea or not. Just got the results back today, actually they could have been on the DNA website for the past couple of days. I just realized toady that they were there. Any way, it appears that I have 6 mutations in the HVR-1 sequence.

    They are:
    Location.....Region.......Mutation Type......Nucleotide
    16209.........HVR-1........Substitution...........T > c
    16218.........HVR-1........Substitution...........C > t
    16223.........HVR-1........Substitution...........C > t
    16292.........HVR-1........Substitution...........C > t
    16311.........HVR-1........Substitution...........T > c
    16519.........HVR-1........Substitution...........T > c

    • Substitution - occurs with a nucleotide changes; it can be subcategorized as transition or transversion

    By using the two markers that are bolded, it is predicted the closest halogroup match is L3f.

    Below you will see which halogroup is associated with which mutation.

    mtDNA Haplogroup........Fitness Score........Match Quality.............Mutations
    L3f.....................................2......... ..............Strong.................16209, 16223
    M7a....................................2.......... .............Strong................16209, 16223
    W.......................................2......... ..............Strong................16223, 16292
    M7a1...................................1.......... .............Medium.............16209, 16223, 16324
    M10.....................................1......... ..............Medium.............16223, 16311, 16357
    N.........................................1....... ................Medium.................16223

    Well that is all I have for now. I am thinking of having both the HVR-2 and SNP markers analyzed as well. Then hopefully I will have a complete or at least better picture of my maternal line.
    If I say napptural and you say natural, we're talking about the same thing-differently. But if I say natural and you say re.laxer, then one of us is f*ckin wrong.

  2. #2
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    What does all of that stuff mean? I'm guessing that its from your fathers side.
    noirmuse
    A new year: I'm ready to accept my potential and achieve my success in all its forms...

  3. #3
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    Yeah translate that for the clueless like me please

    "What is for you cyaah be unfor you" Colin Channer
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    5 1/2 year update

  4. #4
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    What does all of that stuff mean? I'm guessing that its from your fathers side.
    [/b]

    Since I was the one that was tested and I am a female all the results are for my mother's maternal side. So in other words my mom's line was traced using mitochondrial DNA which is linked passed from the mother to the child. In order for it to have been my dad's family I would 1) need to be a male and 2) have the y chromosome.

    To be honest I am not 100% sure what all this means. I am waiting on my friend at work to return from vacation. She has a PhD in genetics, which I am hoping will give better insight.

    From what I am guessing is that for each mutation (substitution) can be viewed as an different ethnic background other then the original. The original ethnic background is West African (L3f halogroup). The next halogroup that has a strong relationship to my genes is M7a, which is East Asian. And a surprise to me, cause I do not resemble an Asian person.

    The W halogroup, to which I have a strong possiblity to being related to people from the Ural Mountains and the eastern Baltic, though it is also found in India as well as Spain, Finland, Poland, Iran, Pakistan and Thailand.

    So it is possible that my mother's side of the family has an heritage of West African, East Asian, and one of the ethnic groups from the W halogroup.
    If I say napptural and you say natural, we're talking about the same thing-differently. But if I say natural and you say re.laxer, then one of us is f*ckin wrong.

  5. #5
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    you are so lucky. i did that in school once BUT I WAS THE ONLY ONE whose DNA got messed up in the centrifuge I think. I was so hot cause the project was interesting. Where did you do this at/
    Thanks to my angel who made me PANK again!!!

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    That's very interesting stuff! ^_^

    Peace,
    Rasta
    "As you educate a woman, you educate the family. If you educate the girls, you educate the future."

    Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan

    Never be limited by other people's limited imaginations. If you adopt their attitudes, then the possiblity won't exist because you'll have already shut it out. You can hear other people's wisdom, but you've got to re-evaluate the world for yourself.
    Dr. Mae Jemison, astronaut

    Run Isiah 40:31

  7. #7
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    Sw33tHon3yTwist, congratulations on receiving your results! Your strongest match is the one that you should go with. African DNA has the most mutations, other folks' DNA doesn't mutate so much.

    As far as mutations go, when studying DNA genetic scientists created (chose) a Standard DNA. Any part of your DNA that is different than that standard is a "mutation". The numbers represent a piece of your DNA. At each piece of DNA you will have on of the following letter, "A", "T", or "G". I don't remember what they stand for but it basically tells how your strands of DNA are connected to each other.

    For example: If the scientist-appointed standard DNA has an "A" at #16209 and your DNA strand has a "T" at that location of your DNA, then your mutation would be 16209T because that is where you differ from the standard.

    Most ethnic backgrounds can be detected because each usually has genetic mutations that are unique to that group. My haplogroup is L1c2 (usually found in Central Africa, but also appears in West Africa). In looking at my mutations (and I gots a plenty), L1c2 is what the results read. Now I have a genetic cousin (I met her through our shared results - we have never officially met) with the exact same DNA mutations. She had another test done that said that our haplogroup should be "X", which is found in ancient Europeans and certain Native American tribes.

    To explain it simply, the "X" haplogroup had some mutations that matched mine which at first glance would seem to solve it. Howvere, as I said before African DNA has more mutations that most others. The "L1c2" haplogroup was a stronger match because it contains more mutations and almost ALL of my DNA mutations. It may be that you match *some* mutations of the "W", but that you have more mutations and those match the African haplogroup.

    By the way, we will have some mutation matches with other people because everyone is descended from an African "EVE" that shared some of her DNA with her descendants who settled outside of Africa. African DNA is the original DNA. no bias! ;-)

    I would suggest that you take the African Ancestry DNA test. It's pricey but I am glad that I did it! I would love to see your results. It eliminated some ambiguity about my haplogroup/origins. I shared a 99.2% match to the Akan people from Ghana.

  8. #8
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    And this is why I fall asleep in biology class.



    Lol, just kidding, sis!

  9. #9
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    you are so lucky. i did that in school once BUT I WAS THE ONLY ONE whose DNA got messed up in the centrifuge I think. I was so hot cause the project was interesting. Where did you do this at/
    [/b]

    I got the test done at www.genebase.com the cost was $119 + SH. I will have to pay another $119 to have the HVR-2 sequence looked at and $89 to the SNP done. However, if you go to www.africandna.com you can have both the HVR-1 and HVR-2 sequences run for $189. The test at African DNA will tell you what part of Africa you are associated with (through your mom if you are a woman) and as they put it "will give you the migration pattern of your branch of mankind."

    MariposaMorena08, thanks for the extra info. I have already been thinking of taking the African Ancestry test, in fact I have their website bookmarked. First I am going to finish with genebase, they have two more test that can be run, 1) to look at the genes in HVR-2 and 2) SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism). The combination of all three of these test should give me more sound information. Thanks again.
    If I say napptural and you say natural, we're talking about the same thing-differently. But if I say natural and you say re.laxer, then one of us is f*ckin wrong.

  10. #10
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    MariposaMorena08,

    I do have a question that I am hoping you can possibly answer. On the site where my DNA was tested, there is one other person who has the exact same mutations in the HVR-1 sequence as me. Does it mean that there is a possibility that we are genetically related? Also, for each mutation that a person has different from me, does that mean we are distant cousins. For example if a person has only one mutation different from my sequence can it be considered that we may possibly be related?
    If I say napptural and you say natural, we're talking about the same thing-differently. But if I say natural and you say re.laxer, then one of us is f*ckin wrong.

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